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December 11, 1954 - Image 4

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-12-11

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Moult

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATUiIJ AY, DECEMBER- 11, 1954

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FOUR THE MICHIGAN DAILY SATURDAY, DECEMBER 11, 1954

UNKNOWN LANGUAGE:
'U' Professor Analyzes Elamite
By GAIL GOLDSTEIN ..'
Trying to analyze an ancient
language is not an easy job.

Elamite, a language of the Near
East that it not related to any
other known language, is just one
problem that Prof. Herbert H.
Paper of the Department of Near
Eastern studies is interested in.
Understood By Eight
According to Prof. Paper, Ela-
mite has been neglected by schol-
ars and there are only about eight
people in the world at all ac-
quainted with it. Linguists are
now concentrating on trying to
establish the meanings of many
Elamite words so more informa-
tion on the civilization which used
it may be forthcoming.
In 1951-52 Prof. Paper was able
to work on the project first hand.
He went to Iran on a Fulbright
and worked with French archeolo-
gists who were excavating at Susa.
There he was able to examine
Elamite inscriptions on baked
bricks as they were discovered in
the diggins. Since then, the direc-
tor has continued to send Prof.
Paper photographs and squeezes
made out of liquid latex for study.
Usually the study of this ancient
language is done from photo-
graphs published of hand-drawn
copies of specimens of the inscrip-
tions. From these it may be pos-
sible to work out the grammer
of Elamite and also obtain some-
thing of the history of the lang-
uage.
Studied Latin, Greek, Chinese
As an undergraduate student
at the University of Colorado,
Prof. Paper studied Latin and
Greek. While in the Army he
was assigned to study Chinese,
presumably to ready him for serv-
ice as an interpreter, although the
Army never used him as an in-
terpreter after his training was
completed.
Out of the service in 1946, Prof.
Paper studied linguistics at the
University of Chicago and receiv-
ed his advanced degrees there. He
also studied cunieform at the Or-
obs Available
For Seniors
Seniors are urged to turn in
registration blanks for post-grad-
uation employment as soon as pos-
sible, T. Luther Purdom, direc-
tor of the Bureau of Appointments
said yesterday.
Several employers from busi-
ness, industry, schools and other
areas are seeking seniors for jobs.
Because of senior's laxity in re-
turning registration forms and re-
ference letters, the Bureau of Ap-
pointments cannot produce stud-
ents' qualifications for prospective
employers, Purdom noted.
Registration is not compulsory
for most students. However, sen-
iors in education school are re-
quired to enroll at the Bureau
of Appointments before a teach-
ing certificate will be granted,
Mildred Webber of the Bureau of
Appointments commented.
Prompt action will aid more
careful and favorable placement,
and will avoid last minute confus-
ion, Miss Webber added.
Located in Rm. 3528 Admin-
istration Bldg., the Bureau of Ap-
pointments is open from 9 to
noon and from 2 to 4 p.m. Mon-
day through Friday.

Prof. Lahti
A ddresses
Consumers
"Design is always a prediction-
a product for the future."
Speaking at the third session
of the conference on the American
consumer, Prof. Aarre K. Lahti,.
acting chairman of the art de-
partment of the College of Archi-
tecture and Design, said refine-
ment differences in design rather
than obvious differences must be
recognized.
Design research can best make
use of student opinion for this
group, Prof. Lahti said, as it is
most objective in its attitudes, be-
ing relatively unaffected by econ-
omic factors.
Arleigh C. Hitchcock, a furni-
ture company sales representative,
said that consumers 'are willing
to pay more for superior designs,
but noted that the manufacturer
must have integrity in producing
"good" design.
"The future of consumer design
is marriage of consumer research
and inner artistry," said Donald
Dailey, vice-president of product
planning at a refrigerator com-
pany.
In the afternoon session devoted
to the problem of the unitized kit-
chen, discussion was based on the
value of designing the complete
kitchen, compared to separate
parts.
The two-day conference was un-
der the auspices of the art de-
partment of the College of Archi-
tecture and Design and the In-
stitute of Contemporary Art in
Boston .

Letter Sent
To Gardner
Stirs Aetion
(Continued from Page 1)
They suddenly discovered they
had "forgotten their guns." The
sound of their sirens followed them
back to the station fortheir weap-
ons. Meanwhile, ambulances had
arrivedealso accompaniedby si-
rens, to take Peterson to the hospi-
tal. By that time the officers, hav-
ing armed themselves, came dash-
ing back to the scene of the crime.
"It Wasn't Boggie"
Peterson lived long enough to tell
his daughter who had attacked him.
Gardner writes, "Suffice it to say
that this name was not the name
of Clarence Boggie, nor could that
name at any time ever be connect-
ed in any way with him."
There was nothing to connect
Boggie with Peterson's murder. In
the course of the investigation, po-
lice picked up a suspect who was
identified by witnesses, but later
announced this man had a perfect
alibi. Another witness had seen
the man some distance from Peter-
son's shack "at the time the si-
rens went by."
"What sirens?" Gardner wanted
to know. The police assumed he
meant the sirens on their way to
answer the frenzied phone calls of
Peterson's neighbors and released
the suspect.
Approximately two years later
Boggie was arrested for the mur-
der of Moritz Peterson.
(Tomorrow: Trial, conviction,
pardon)

The Stanley Quartet will pre-
sent the fifth concert in the com-
plete Beethoven Cycle of String
Quartets at 3:30 p.m. tomorrow
in the Rackham Lecture Hall.
Started on October 3, the series
will conclude Jan. 9 with the
playing of Quartet in C minor,
Quartet in B-flat major and the
Great Fugue.
"Since the days of Joseph Joa-
chim, the performance of the en-
tire cycle has been the supreme
challenge for any string-quartet
organization," Prof. Hans T. Dav-
id commented in his progiarn
notes for the series.
Quartet Members
Mvade up of Prof. Emil Raab and
Prof.Gilbert Ross, violinists; Prof.
Robert Courte, viola; and Prof.
Oliver Fdel, cello, the quartet will
play three quartets in tomorrow's
concert.
Highlighting the concert will be
the Quartet in C-sharp Minor,
op. 131. Beethoven called this
quartet his greatest while Prof.
Raab said, "as the work unfolds,

fresh marvels of synthesis of
structure and expression appear at
every turn."
"Its compartive brevity," he con-
tinued, "is gained by the exclus-
ion of all irrelevancies, by a mas-
terful concentration. Spontaneous
and irresistible, the work seems to
flower out of its inner expressive-
ness."

Stanley Quartet To Give
Fifth Beethoven Concert

Political Talk
To Be Given
George Louis Rebattet, Secre-
tary-general of the European
Movement,.will speak on-"France's
Political Situation" to graduate
students and faculty members of
the political science department at
8 p.m Tuesday in the Rackham
Amphitheater.
Rebattet is lecturing in the
United States through arrange-
ments' of the Institute of Inter-
national Education.

I'

,

TEACHER AND STUDENT TOURS TO EUROPE
POPULAR AND ALL EXPENSE TOURS

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TRANS OCEAN TRAVEL AGENCY
315 Fifth Ave., New York 16, Phone MUrray Hill 4-0476
Joseph M. Morrison, Manager
Former Student at the Universities in Paris and Brussels

i
t 4
,

A

-Daily-Dean Morton
PROF. PAPER LECTURES ON ANCIENT PERSIA.

"t1

iental Institute in Chicago. He
remained fascinated'by his study
of ancient tongues.
"One-way to help carify ancient
historical situations," Prof. Paper
claims, "is through the scientific
study of languages and how they
operate. This is the job of ling-
uistics in general. From studying
clay tablets which are in reality
the actual manuscripts of ancient
scribes, one important way of re-
discovering ancient civilizations is
possible."

At present Prof. Paper is teach-
ing Modern Persian at the Uni-
versity. Though many ancient
languages are better known than
Elamite, linquists can still learn
much from this and other lang-
uages preserved in cunieform.
To prepare for this type of work
much involved training is need-
ed. It is necessary to learn about
the background of the peoples and
the complex interrelationships of
the various languages used in the
ancient Near East, he said.

A

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DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

(Continued from Page 2)
Xi chapter of Pi Lambda Theta will
hold fall initiation Sat., Dec. 11, at 3:00
p.m. in Rackham Assembly Hall.
S.R.A. Square Dance Party will be
held downstairs in Lane Hall Sat., Dec.
11, 8:00-12:00 p.m. Refreshments.
Movies. Free movie, "Realm of the
wild," Dec. 7-13. 4th floor Exhibit
Hall, Museums Building, daily at 3:00
and 4:00 p.m., including Sat. and Sun.;
extra showing Wed. at 12:30. Open to
the public.
Gilbert and Sullivan Society. Board
meeting today at 1:00 p.m. in the
League.
Lutheran Student Association. Sat.,
2:00 p.m. Freshmen Council invites all
freshmen students to the Center Sat.
afternoon to trim the Christmas tree
and decorate the Center for the Holi-
day Season. Corner of Hill St. and For-
est Ave.
Coming Events
Hillel: Chorus Rehearsal Sun. at 4:30
p.m. in the main chapel. Accompanist
needed. Sun. 6:00 p.m. Supper Club and
Record Dance.
The Graduate Outing Club will meet
Sun. at 2:00 p.m. in front of the north
entrance of the Rackham Building.
Wear old clothes.
Fireside Forum of the First Methodist
Church will meet at the Youth Room
of the Church at 7:30 p.m. Sun., Dec.
12, to go Christmas caroling, returning
to the home of Rev, and Mrs. Wang-
dahl for reffeshments. Single gradu-
ate students.
Communion Breakfast Sun., Dec. 12

following 9:30 a.m. Mass at the Newman
Club. Three guest speakers will de-
scribe their experiences in Communist-
controlled countries.
S.R.A. All-Campus Carol Sing on the
General Library steps, followed by hot
wassail at Lane Hall. Come in groups
or alone. Dress warmly and comfortably.
8:15 p.m. Sun., Dec. 12.
Lutheran Student Association Sun.,
7:00 p.m. Annual Christmas Program.
Hill St. and Forest Ave.
Unitarian Student Group will meet
Sun., Dec. 12, at 7:30 p.m. at the
church. Recording of "Don Juan in
Hell." Those wanting transportation
meet at Lane Hall or in front of Alice
Lloyd Hall at 7:15 p.m.
Women's Research Club will meet
Mon., Dec. 13 in the East Lecture
Room, Rackham Building, at 8:00 p.m.
Dr. Avery Test will talk on, "A Zoolo-
gist Explores a Tropical Cloud Forest."
Colored slides. New members will be
welcomed into the Club.
Undergraduate Mathematics Club will
meet Mon., Dec. 13, in Room 3A of the
Michigan Union at 8:00 p.m. Prof.
Wilfred Kaplan will speak on "Integra-
tion by Parts."
Michigan Actuarial Club. Mon., Dec.
13 at 4:00 p.m. in Room 3-B of the
Michigan Union. Robert M. Duncan,
F.S.A., Actuary of the Teachers In-
surance and Annuity Association and
of the College Retirement Equities
Fund, will speak on "College Retire-
mient Equities Fund."
Russian Circle will meet Mon., Dec.
13, 8:00 p.m. at the International Cen-
ter. A play will be given by students
in the Russian Department. Refresh-
ments.
University Lecture in Journalism by
Leland Stowe, noted foreign corre-
spondent and radio and TV news an-
alyst on "Moscow's Underground War
for Germany." Mon., Dec. 13, 4:15 p.m.,
Rackham Amphitheater.

SAFEGUARD YOUR MONEY
Carry your cash by means of
TiRAVELERS CHEUES
* CONVENIENT
* SAFE
9 PRACTICAL
Inquire NOW at

ST. NICHOLAS GREEK ORTHODOX
CHURCH
414 North Mainr
Rev. Father Eusebius A. Stephanou
9:30 A.M.--Matins Service
10:30 A.M.-Divine Liturgy
Alternate Thursdays, 7:30 P.M.-Orthodox Stu-
dent Guild
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER AND
CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill and Forest Avenue
Dr. H. O. Yoder, Pastor
Sunday-
9:00 and 11:00 A.M.-Worship Services
10:00 A.M.-Bible Study
7:00 P.M.-Christmas Program
Wednesday-
7:30 P.M.-Caroling Party
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL AND
REFORMED
423 South Fourth Ave.
Walter S. Press, Pastor
Warren Winkler, Director of Student Work
10:45 A.M-Worship Service. Sermon by Rev.
Press: "The Word of Life"
7:00 P.M.-Student Guild: Christmas Program.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed Churches
of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director
Res. Ph. NO 5-4205. Office Ph. NO 8-7421
10:00 A.M.-Morning Service
7:00 P.M.-Evening Service
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
Father McPhillip
William and Thompson Sts.
Sunday Masses-
8:00 - 9:30 - 11:00 - 12:00
Daily-7:00 - 8:00 - 9:00
Novena Devotions--Wednesday evenings-7:30
P.M.
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. George Barger, Minister

'THlE ANN ARBOR BANK

Main and Huron Streets
State Street at Nickels Arcade
1108 South University
Packard at Brocknan
WHITMORE LAKE, MICHIGAN

FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw, Phone NO 2-0085
Edward H. Redman, Minister
Mr. and Mrs. G. C. Bailey, Advisor to Students
Mrs. Fay A. Kincaid, Director of Religious
Education
Miss Betsy Gidley, Organist
Saturday: 8:00 P.M.-Adult Group Pot-Luck at
the Church
Sunday: 10:00 A.M.-Unitarian Adult Group and
Church School. Mr, Dean Baker on: "Henry
Steele Commager's speech on.: 'Guilt by As-
sociation.'
11:00 A.M.-Service of Worship: Sermon by Ed.
ward H. Redman on: "The Higher Criticism."
5:00 P.M.-Unitarian Youth Fellowship at 1111
White Street
7:30 P.M.-Unitarian Student Group at the
church
Monday: 8:00 P.M.-Unitarian Men's Club at
2009 Shadford-home of Charles Lipson, with
Mr. Helmut Stern on his recent trip to Israel.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
William and State Sts.
Minister-Rev. Leonard A. Parr
Minister to Students: Rev. H. L, Pickerill;
Assoc. Sue Gillespie.
Morning worship at10:45 a.m. The Church School
meets at 10:45 a.m. Dr. Leonard A. Parr's
sermon will be: "There's a Star in the Sky!"
There will be a reception of members and a coffee
hour following the morning service.
The Student Guild has planned a Christmas Buffet
at 6:00 p.m. at the, Guild House, followed
by a Christmas program led by Marcia Ahbe
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 West Stadium
(Formerly at Y.M.C.A.)
Sundays-10:15 A.M. 11:00 A.M., 7:30 P.M.
Wednesdays-7:30 P.M., Bible Study, G. Wheeler
Utley, Minister
Hear: "The Herald of Truth" WXYZ-ABC Net-
work Sundays-100-1:30 P.M.
ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT FOUNDATION
306 North Division St.
Sunday Services at 8, 9, 11 A.M,, and 8 P.M.
Lectures on The Faith of the Church at 4:30 P.M.
Supper Club at 6:00 P.M.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, Scientist
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
9:30 A.M.-Sunday School
11:00 A.M.-Sunday Morning Service
Dec. 12-God the Preserver of Man
8:00 P.M.-Wednesday: Testimonial Service
A free reading room is maintained at 339 South
Main Street where the Bible and all authorized
Christian Science literature may be read, bor-
rowed or purchased.
Reading Room hours are Monday, 11:00 A.M.
to 9 P.M.; Tuesday-Saturday 11:00 A.M. to
5 P.M.; and Sunday 2:30 to 4:30 P.M.
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State and Huron Streets,
Phone NO 2-1121
Win. C. Bennett, Pastor
10:00-Sunday School
11 :00-"The Assurance of the Christan's Vic-
tory"
6:00-Student Guild
7:30-"The. Rise and Fall of a TyrarIt
Wednesday 7:30-Prayer Meeting
We extend a cordial welcome to each of you.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East Huron, Phone NO 8-7332
Rev. C. H. Loucks, Minister
Beth Mahone, Asst. 'Student Counselor
Sunday, December 12-
9:45-Bible Class studies Luke
11:00-Sermon: "Keeping Christ ii Christmas"
6:45-Mrs. Reed will give a Christmas reading.

I - - * * * * * * * * *.I

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10:45-Morning Worship. Sermon:
MOVE A MOUNTAIN
9:45 A.M.-Church School

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CONGREGATIONAL-DISCIPLES STUDENT GUILD
6:00 P.M., Guild House. Christmas Buffet and
worship program.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
AND STUDENT CENTER
1432 Washtenaw Ave,
Henry Kuizenga and George Laurent, Ministers
William S. Baker and Eduard Sue, University
Pastors
9:15-Discussion "What Do You Believe?"
11:00-Morning Worship
5:45-Fellowship dinner
6:45-Student caroling
8:00-Vespers

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UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenow Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 9:30 and at 10:45: Services with the
pastor preaching on "How To Get The Most
Out of Christmas." (Holy Communion in both
services).
Sunday at- 6:00: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Stu-

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FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
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