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December 09, 1954 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-12-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

- I

PAGE SIc

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY,.DECEMBER 9. 19M

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INTELLECTUAL APPROACH:
Arner Pursues 'Dream Girl' Career

Boggie Case
Starts Public
'Cour fTrial
(Continued from Page 1)

(4;*-

By PAT ROELOFS
The leading role in Elmer Rice's
"Dream Girl" is being played by
a girl who has herself dreamed
many of the roles she takes in the
play.
Most typical of Gwen Arner's
dreams illustrated in the Broad-
way hit now being performed at
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre, is
that of a famous actress. She
dreams she is Portia from Shakes-
peare's "Merchant of Venice" and
orates the famous trial scene.
Other Roles
Gwen's real-life aspirations have
gone beyond the dreaming stage,
however. In three years at the
University she has performed
such roles as Gertrude in "Ham-
let" under the well known Shakes-
pearean director B. Iden Payne,
and Liza in Shaw's "Pygmalion."
Last year she played the dramatic
part of Catherine Sloper in "The
Heiress."
In addition she performed the
part of the ballet-dancing bird
queen, Procne in Aristophane's
"The Birds" and played a small
role in "Sabrina Fair" with pro-
fessional directors during last
spring's Drama Season.
So seriously does Gwen feel
about each role she takes, that she
can be heard rehearsing lines while
going through her household
chores. On into the wee hours of
the morning, when long, wearing
(Paid Political Adv.)
Vote to keep
RON RICHARDSON
on S.L.
(Paid Political Adv.)

GWEN ARNER

periods of stage rehearsals are ov-
er, she practices carefully the lines
and motions of the parts she plays.
A middle aged admirer of her
histrionic talent remarked that
Gwen has "an intellectual ap-
proach to theater." So confident
are he and others who have seen
her perform that she will some day
capitalize on her acting abilities,
they are already imagining her
name in lights on the Great White
Way.
Ballet Choreography
Gwen's interests are not only in
acting, however. Last year she
choreographed a modern dance to
Bernstein's "Age of Anxiety" that
was performed on television here
and in Grand Rapids.
To balance with her extra-cur-
ricular activities there is an aca-

demic side to the 22-year-old stu-
dent from Omaha. Making Phi
Beta Kappa last year and winning
the Phi Kappa Phi scholarship for
outstanding achievement, she has
fouild time to spend some of her
nervous energy on books. -
Odd Hours
Currently she is enrolled both in
graduate school and -is finishing
her bachelor's degree in speech as
a senior. She spends what odd
hours there are left between class-
es and rehearsals as a librarian
in the Speech Library.
At the end of a busy day re-
cently, Gwen was speculating on
the state of things in Ann Arbor.
"I've had a job as an unappointed
apartment inspector this fall just
as a sideline," she remarked as she
finished arranging furniture in her
third dwelling of the semester.
"Apartment conditions are ter-
rible," she concluded, relating that
whenever it rained she was wad-
ing in water to her knees in her
previous living quarters.
Observing her in one of her
calm moments, which means that
her perpetual motion was some-
what reduced in rate, her room-
mate complimented Gwen on "her
marvelous cooking." It's just one
of her accomplishments, accord-
ing to her many friends. "Her
sense of humor, her artistic abil-
ity, her intelligence and willing-
ness to act as a tutor for some of
her artist friends are reasons she
is always surrounded by a crowd,"
one of them observed.
Of one thing all of her admirers
are certain, she will captivate an
audience wherever she g o e s ,
Watching her pack her makeup
kit and rearrange her costume in
readiness to leave for her back-
stage dressing room, one feltksure
they were right.

The letter concerned William
Marvin Lindley, who was at that
time awaiting execution at San
Quentin. The lawyer felt that
Lindley was innocent, that he had
been a victim of a weird combina-
tion of circumstances.
Because there was a certain sin-
cerity in the letter, Gardner stu-
died the enclosed outline of the
case. A feeling that something was
wrong in the maze of facts led to
long hours of scrutiny. He was
finally rewarded by the emer-
gence of a startling fact.
From only the known facts of
the case, Gardner found that Lin-
dley had an alibi in the testimony
of the father of the girl for whose
murder he was convicted, and in
the evidence of other witnesses
when combined with the father's.
Since Lindley's execution was
then but a matter of hours, Gard-
ner hurried a letter to each
justice of the California Supreme
Court. A stay of execution was
granted by the lieutenant gov-
ernor, possibly upon the interven-
tion of the justices.
Insanity Declared
While further investigation got
under way, Lindley succumbed to
the death row's mental crucifi-
xions. He was declared insane and
his sentence was commuted to life
imprisonment, where the case end-
ed.
Gardner's entrance into the
Lindley case had not gone unnot-
iced in the press, which was to
have vital significance later.
The next step leading to the
beginning of the Court of Last
Resort was a relaxed trip down
the peninsula of Baja California
by Gardner, Steeker and his wife,
Shirley, two of Gardner's secre-
taries, and Sam Hicks of Wyom-
ing.
(TOMORROW: BAJA
CALIFORNIA)

"Donate Blood and Save Lives."
Into the crowded curriculum of
busy University students comes an
opportunity to aid the movement
that is sweeping the country-
the attempt to build the nation's
blood supply.
Sponsored by service fraternity
Alpha Phi Omega, a trained tech-
nical staff from Detroit is in Ann
Arbor running the first all-cam-
pus Blood Drive.
Located in Hinsdale House of
East Quad, the drive is scheduled
to end tomorrow, unless sufficient
demand requires it to be extend-
ed until Dec. 15.
When students first enter the
station, their name, address and
credit to any organization is taken
by local Red Cross volunteer work-
ers. Those under 21 years of age
are required to have written per-
mission from their parents or legal
guardian in order to donate blood.
The next step is an examination,
at which their medical history,
blood pressure and present health
status is checked. This insures that
the loss of blood -vill not be detri-
mental to them, .and also elimi-

nates prospective donors whose
blood could not be used.
A glass of orange juice before
entering the donor room serves to
increase the body fluid. The actual
taking of one pint of blood takes
approximately five minutes and is
practically painless.
After giving blood the- donor is
escorted to the canteen where he
is given milk or coffee and cookies.
The liquids replace his body fluids
and the 15-minute rest period
gives the donor an opportunity to
relax before leaving. After-effects
seldom occur.
The complete process, from reg-
istration on, takes the student
only a half hour.
The blood received is placed in
iced containers and sent to De-
troit, where it is processed and
distributed where ever it is needed.
Alpha Phi Omega will award
trophies to the men's residence
hall, women's residence hall, fra-
ternity, sorority, independent or-
ganization and ROTC group that
contribute, by percentage, the
most blood:

Blood Drive Continues
Students C ontribute
'.. 'To Campus Effort

LOCAL VOLUNTEERS REGISTER STUDENTS

"DONATE BLOOD AND SAVE LIVES"

feronacttzect
CHRISTMAS CARDS
RUST CRAFT
CURRIER & IVES ENGLISH DESIGNS
MICHIGAN SEAL
CHRISTMAS WRAPPINGS
Since MORRILL'S Phone
1908 314 S. State St. NO 8-7177
be an angel
gve him a
ANTI-FREEZ
*JACKET
e$ s
4.-
Warmest in the world for its weight. Sturdy

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NURSE TAKES MEDICAL HISTORY OF DONOR

ORANGE JUICE BEFORE DONATING INCREASES BODY FLUIDS

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NURSE LOOKS AFTER STUDENT DONATING BLOOD BY PAINLESS, EASY, QUICK METHOD

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DAILY
PHOTO
FEATURE

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