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December 09, 1954 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-12-09

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THURSDAY, DECEMBER 9, 1954

THE NIICftlGAN DAIJLT

TIIU1~SDAY, DECEMBER 9,1954 'IUE MI43UibAN MAIIA

Diving Important Factor
In Gym Captain's Success

By DAVE GREY
Diving boards to trampolines is
the simplest way to tell the suc-
cess story of Bill Winkler, cap-
tain of the 1954-55 gymnastics
team.
The similarity of skill involved
between the acrobatics of a man
on the trampoline and a diver off
the board is notable. The same
precision of form is necessary in
both sports, as well as similar
body motions. The high school
diving career of Bill Winkler gave
him a start in the right direction.
Stager Tells Mann
Winkler originally planned to
attend Western Michigan College
upon graduation from Grosse
Pointe High, but was spotted by
present Michigan swim coach, Gus
Stager. Stager told ex-coach Matt
M Mann about Winkler, and Mann
encouraged the young diver to
come to Michigan.
While taking a gym course un-
der the tutelage of Newt Loken,

gymnastics coach, Winkler became
interested in the trampoline. Lo-
ken asked him to come out for the
gym team.. The transition from
board to tramp was easy.
Winkler Leads
Since that time, through hard
work and natural ability, Winkler
has become top Michigan trampo-
line man. Last year in his first
season of varsity competition he
placed fourth in the Big Ten in
that event.
Loken expects his captain to
rate near the top again this sea-
son. "Winkler is a hard worker-
dependable--and sets a fine ex-
amle for the rest of the squad."
Besides being a member of the
Druids and head of the cheer-
leading squad, Winkler is a good
student and has aided Loken in
trampoline and tumbling exhibi-
tions throughout the state.
NHL HOCKEY
Chicago 2, New York 1
Toronto 3, Montreal 1

Ice Hockey
Originated
At McGill
The lightning fast game of ice
hockey has been in existence since
1879, when several imaginative
McGill University students thought
of putting the game of field hock-
ey on skates.
Although many people have felt
for a long time that our present
sport was derived from lacrosse
and the Canadian Indians, more
recently evidence proves that this
is probably not the case.
As Frederic Hague, a member
of the first McGill team, ognce said,
"To say that the Indians originat-
ed a game played on ice with
skates is obviously wrong because,
during the Canadian winters, the
Indians were too much occupied
with getting food to think of play-
ing games. The French Canadians,
until recently, dhid not go in for
sports to any extent."
The First Game
The first game of hockey played
in the area of Montreal was a
mixture of field hockey with a few
Rugby football rules "thrown in."
Teacs were established for nine
men on a side, but so many stu-
dents showed up that the contest
turned into a "Merry scramble"
with everyone who could find a
stick participating.
R. F. Smith, one of the sport's
main instigaters at McGill,: is
quoted as saying, "Our clubs were
a motley collection. Some boys
borrowed their father's walking
sticks. Others used stipped lacrosse
clubs . . . broomhandles or
branches cut from trees."
The first puck was the squared
off core of a hard rubber ball,
since the ball in its entirety
bounced around too much.

New Stroke May Force
Change in Tank Marks.

4-

By BOB JONES
An Olympic Committee rule
change, made in 1952 and origi-
nally considered the death-war-
rant of the breaststroke event, has
proved to be a shot in the arm
for the sport of swimming.
The first reaction of United
States swim coaches to the change,
which ruled out the overarm re-
covery of the "butterfly" stroke,
was one of indignation. America
3.t first disregarded the change.
The 1953-54 season saw no
change-over in Intercollegiate
Rules.wAmerican breaststrokers
still swam the butterfly arm-
stroke with the conventional kick,
and no one swam -the orthodox
under-water recovery.
This year thingschanged. The
Intercollegiate Rule Book now
recognizes two separate strokes-
the breaststroke and the butterfly
stroke. The underwater recovery
is the only one accepted for the
breaststroke.
Concerning the breaststroke
kick, the rule reads: "The feet.
shall be drawn up together, the
knees bent and apart ... Up and
down movements of the legs in
the vertical plane are prohibited."
Stroke Explained -
The butterfly rule demands an
overarm recovery "when the swim-
mer is on the surface." "Both arms

BERT WARDROP
. . . a new era begins

III 1O I II I 1 II I I 11 1 1 MI

"Don't

Shoot!"
*0

must be brought forward together
over the water and brought back-
ward simultaneously." Any simul-
taneous leg kick is acceptable.
This last allows for the use of
the so-called "dolphin" or "fish-
tail" kick-a simultaneous up and
down whipping of the legs. The
tremendous increase of speed
which this kick gives is best il-
lustrated by looking at the Euro-
pean 100 meter breaststroke mark.
The record with the fishtail still
illegal was in the vicinity of 1:05.0.
This summer a Hungarian, using

the new kick, lowered the mark
to 1:02.4.
Now Two Events
The separation of the old stroke
into two styles has given swim-
ming a new stroke. Addition of a
new event is a boost to any sport.
It gives athletes a new field in
which to establish records. Also
the colorful dolphin kick and the
overwater recovery of the butter-
fly give plenty of "splash"-some-
thing which pleases the specta-
tors.
Another attraction lies in the
fact tltat most spectators have
never seen an orthodox breast-
stroke race. This event is being
swum mostly underwater now. A
good breaststroker will go the first
fifty yards under the surface, com-
ing up only at the end of a lap
for air after the second turn is
passed.
The new rule also includes a
change in the distances involved.
The past few years, dual meet
competition has included only a
200 yard breaststroke event. This
rule will hold true, with swimmers
covering the distance in the orth-
odox style.
In the NCAA and Big Ten meets,
however, the old 100 yard event
will be discarded for a 200 yard
butterfly distance.
Stager Speaks
Michigan swimming coach, Gus
Stager, feels the new rule is
"great for swimming." He said
that Wolverine breaststrokers are
adapting very well to the butter-
fly stroke. Stager cited Bumpy
Jones, and Jack and Bert Ward-
rop as having picked up the fish-
tail kick quite rapidly.
Stager feels that butterfly swim-
mers will soon turn in times of
"about 53 or 52 seconds" for the
100 yard event. The record under
the old rules was :58.8.
Late Scores
NBA BASKETBALL
Rochester 105, Syracuse 78
Fort Wayne 92, Milwaukee 68
Philadelphia 86, New York 77
Minneapolis 101, Boston 99
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Notre Dame 79, Northwestern 69
Purdue 62, Valparaiso 50
Vordham 60, Syracuse 56
Virginia 79, Navy 69
Carnegie Tech 79, Pitt 67
Oklahoma A&M 77, Texas 49
Cincinnati 93, Hanover 50
Western Michigan 95, Central
Michigan 91 (Double Over.
time)

I-M Wrestling Finals
Scheduled for Tonight
Campus grapplers will make
their bids for the Intramural wres -Heavyweight - Kuchka (S
tling championships tonight in vs. Onders (SAE)
the gymnastics room of the RESIDENCE HALLS
Sports Building at 7:30 p.m. 123-Encisco (Cooley) vs.
The finalists will be battling for (Cooley)
individual titles in eight weight 130 - Summerwell (Adams)
classes in the fraternity division Toyami (Gomberg)
and seven weight classes in the 137-Gale (A-Rumsey) vs.
residence hall division. Queen (Gomberg)
Assistant v a r s i t y wrestling 147-Hunter (Taylor) vs. B
coach, Bob Betzig, who is han- (Michigan)
157 - Beaver (A-Rumsey)
Anyone interested in referee- Price (Scott)
ing I-M basketball games please 167 - Atwood (Cooley)
report on Tuesday, December Kauffman (Gomberg)
14, at 7:15 p.m. to the staff Heavyweight - Armelagas {
room of the Sports Building. ams) vs. Fontenessi (Stra
-Dave Waleryszak * * *
dling the wrestling competition, - Scores
announced that spectators are wel- SWIMMING
come to watch the finals. ChiPsi 27, Chi Phi 30
The following are the finalists Adams 36, Allen-Rumsey 21
in each class: ZBT 32, Lambda Chi Alpha 21
FRATERNITY Huber 35, Cooley 19
123-Siegel (SAM) vs. Anderson VOLLEY BALL
(Theta Chi) Theta Chi 4, Triangle 3
130-Juergens (SAE) vs. Moss Theta Delta Chi 6, Triangle 3
(SAM) Pi Lambda Phi 4, Lambda Chii Al:
Roger Williams 4,.Cong. Dise. 3
137-Bowen (ATO) vs. Jacobs Alpha Delta Phi 4, Phi Sigma Ka
(ATO) Evans Scholars 4, MFC 1
147-Fitch (Delta Tau Delta) Phi Kappa Sigma 4, Trigon 0
vs. Warner (ATO) Nakamura 4, LSA 0
157-Athanson (Phi DeltaThe- Alpha Kappa Kappa 4, Phi Delt
ta) vs. Majoros (ATO) Phi Gamma Delta 4, Beta Theta
167-Heineman (Theta Chi) vs . Sigma Phi 4, Alpha Epsilon Phi
Steele (Phi Kappa Psi) HANDBALL
177-Richardson (Sigma Nu) vs. Adams 3, Cooley 0
Carson (Delta Chi) Gomberg 2, Taylor 1

_

r

-

1

AP SELECTIONS:
Twod' Grid Stars Chosen;
C-g9ad' - R nIm R!t of ,Y,..1'

From recent Student Council minutes:
CHAIRMAN: Next we come to the problem of the appalling
dressing-habits of our freshman. We have noted such un-
orthodox attire as long-point collars, garishly colored
shirts, some actually made of dotted swiss!
SCH. OF MUSIC REP.: Definitely not in harmony with
our standards.
JOURNALISM REP.: To corn a phrase, they ain't on the
ball team.
SCH. OF LOGIC REP.: Why not shoot 'em?
MED. SCHOOL REP.: Great idea! I'll work up a "Good
Taste" serum, refined from some Van Heusen Oxfordian
shirts. We'll inoculate 'em all!
PHILOSOPHY REP.: Who cares!
LAW SCHOOL REP.: (Happily) Yeah, inoculate 'em. Then
maybe some of 'em will get sick, and I .. .
JOURNALISM REP.: Now let's don't go all around Red
Robin Hood's barn ;. . what we need is a campaign to
tell 'em about the Oxfordian , ; ; the silky, smooth
oxford shirts with the smart, modern collar styles.
Bus. ADM. REP.: And don't forget % ; fine long-staple
cotton, woven tighter to last longer... at the amazing price
(thanks to excellent production facilities) of only $4.50.
JOURNALISM REP.: I think we got the gem of an idea here
somewhere ,; ; but first off the bag, we gotta .;.:
MED. SCHOOL REP.: Inoculate 'en.
LOGIC REP.: Yeah, shoot 'em.
CHAIRMAN: All in favor of mass inoculation say Aye.
(MOTION CARRIES.) -
JOURNALISM REP.: Maybe some of 'em already wear
Van Heusen Oxfordians. Don't shoot 'til you see the
whites of their shirts . : -
ART SCHOOL REP.: s and the colors! Don't forget
Oxfordians come in the smartest colors this side of a
Bonnard or a Klee.
PHILOSOPHY REP.: (eating Tootsie-roll) Who cares!

SPORTS
KEN COPP
Night Editor
I *

By The Associated Press
Three great backs from Mid-
west teams top the annual All-
America football team selected by
the Associated Press.
The gridders honored were
Ralph Guglielmi, of Notre Dame;
Howard Cassady, of Ohio State's

For that something utterly
distinctive, give him this superb
set of Genuine Polons. A
Shields original ... this truly
beautiful Polon is flawlessly
polished and smartly patterned
in contrasting designs and
colors. Handsomely gift-boxed
in red velvet, Polons make
a tasteful, different gift
for that very special guy I

Big Ten champions, and Alan
Ameche, the burly fullback of Wis-
consin.
Named in the backfield with
them was Dick Moegle, of Rice.
The All-America line is com-
posed of Frank McDonald, of Mi-
ami, Fla., Ron Beagle, of Navy, at
ends; Jack Ellena, of UCLA, and
Rex Broggan, of Mississippi, at
tackles; Bud Brooks, of Arkansas,
and Ralph Chesnauskas, of Army,
at guards and Kurt Burris, of Ok-
lahoma, at center.
Kramer, Walker Chosen C
Ron Kramer, Michigan end, and
Art Walker, Michigan tackle re-
ceived third-team and honorable
mention selections respectively.
The other Midwesterners on the;
third team were Frank Varrichi-
one of Notre Dame, and Dick Hil-
inski, of Ohio State, at tackles,
and Len Dawson, of Purdue, at
quarterback.
NEW YORK - Oct. 23, 1954 in
football-mad Columbus, O h i o.
There were 82,000 people in the
stadium to see the crucial game
between Ohio State and Wiscon-
sin for the possible Big Ten cham-
pionship and the Rose Bowl bid.
Wisconsin was trying for a sec-
ond touchdown when Howard
"Hopalong" Cassady snatched a
Badger pass out of the air arui
sped 88 yards down the sidelines
for a touchdown. That was the
key play not only of one game, but
of an entire season.
Fourteen of the football writers
and broadcasters participating in
The Associated Press postseason
football poll cast their votes for
Cassady's run as the season's most
spectacular incident.

I

New "Buccaneer" by Mondil
Thousands are changing to this new idea
in winter footwear. Features genuine
shearling lining, for complete comfort,
the new soft, supple ranch tan leathers,
and Neoprene wrap soles.
Sires 4 to 10, AA and B--Price $12.95
in SMOKE ELK or
CHARCOAL GREY
Other styles of "Sno-Boots"
in Red-Tan-Green
$10.95 and up
Van Boven Shoes, Inc.
17 Nickels Arcade

500
plus FAd. twE
MAGAZINE

....

.....

.......

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STORE

HOURS DAILY 9 TO

5 '30

i

VAN HEUSEN SHIRTS

MEN'S AND BOYS' WEAR
DOWNTOWN ANN ARBOR
Monday 8:30 A.M. to 9:00 P.M. - Tuesday thru Saturday 8:30 to 5:30

S Collegiate Styles
to Please!
f 11 Tonsorial Artists
* Complete Tonsorial Service
The Dascola Barbers
near Michigan Theatre

R
Read and Use Daily Classifieds

r

S T A T E

S T R EE T

A T L I B E R T Y

J. ANDRESS

H. SAGER

I

i

I now"

I

pp w4womm .,q

i

b -

Special Purchase Sale
SHELL CORDOVAN SOLES
Town Shoes - by Wolverine
'O95
Reg. 18.95 Value
We have 365 pairs of these

brings flavor back to filter smoking!

wonderful shoes

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of the finest leather money

can buy . .. Save

$8.00

on

every pair.
SIZES 6 TO 12
WIDTHS B TO E
-M mA -t- w -

~_____________________ - -3

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