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September 21, 1954 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-09-21

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"4''MDAF, ' PTI{:Ml °R t2, 1954

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PALL 14rrIW

T~TSDYS~PTMBR 1,194 HEMIHIANDA_._ 1 NM

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BUSY PSYCHOLOGIST:
'U' Professor Named Head
Of National Association

By DEBRA DURCHSLAG
The American Psychological As-
sociation comes to Michigan for
the second consecutive year by
choosing as its new president-elect
Prof. Theodore M. Newcomb.
The easy-mannered psychologist
will be the first president of the
Association who is also a sociolo-
gist. He teaches classes in both the
psychology and sociology depart-
ments; and directs the doctoral
program in social psychology.
Crowded Schedule
Despite a busy schedule which
often forces him to sandwich ap-
pointments in on Saturday after-
noons or during his walk home,
Prof. Newcomb remains one of the
friendliest people on campus. Part
of this may be due to a keen sense
of humor, which is likely to pop
out at any time.
When talking about the APA,
however, Prof. Newcomb becomes
*,quite serious. He will not assume
office until 1955, giving him a year
"'as an apprentice president." Un-
til that time, he will be in close
contact with Prof. E. Lowell Kelly,
director of the Bureau of Psycho-
logical Services here and= current
president of the Association.
Psychology Broadens Aims
The scope of the APA, Prof.
Newcomb explained, has been
° broadened considerably in the di-
rection of practical psychology
since the Association's formation
in 1892, when interest was pri-
marily theoretical.
At that time its constitution put
the APA on record as an associa-
tion to "advance psychology as a
science" period. "Now," said Prof.
Newcomb turning to the APA di-
rectory," the period has been
' changed to a comma and we in-
clude the aims of 'advancement
as a profession and as a means
of promoting human welfare.' "
Today the American Psychologi-

PROF. THEODORE NEWCOMB
cal Association numbers some 13,-
000 and is growing at the rate of
about 1,500 a year. It has come a
long way from the initial group of
about thirty professors who
thought of the field as limited to
theory and research.
Active Career
Prof. Newcomb's own career,
like that of the APA, indicates the
place of psychology among the
practical sciences. Graduating
from Oberlin College in Ohio, he
went on to Columbia for his PhD.
The next years found Prof.
Newcomb teaching psychology. At
Bennington he conducted a much
quoted study of changes in student
political attitudes, and during the
war he was chief of the Analysis
Division of the Foreign Broadcast
Intelligence Service.
This is by no means a complete
list of his accomplishments, which
should include a widely-used text-
book on social psychology and at
the present time work on an ex-
perimental house.

Editors Set
Free Press
Association
Twenty-four college editors from
all parts of the country, meeting
at the National Student Congress
this summer, have organized an
independent national group to
meet the problem of censorship in
the student press.
Called the National Association
for a Free College Press, the new
group hopes to provide a mechan-
ism for investigation of alleged
breaches of editorial freedom in
the college press, and for report-
ing its findings thorughout the
country.
The group has been organized
with a ten-member national exec-
utive committee, representing
wide geographic distribution of
college weeklies and dailies. Daily
Managing Editor, Gene Hartwig,
'55, was named chairman of ,the
new group at the August 22-31
meeting.
Plans call for the Association to
enlist a group of leading profes-
sional editors and publishers
throughout the country as an ad-
visory board to the national or-1
ganization.
Emphasis of the Association's'
investigating procedure would be
on a quick, thorough and objective
examination of the alleged viola-
tion.
The new group believes that the
censoring agency, whether it be
student government, university ad-
ministration or some outside group
directly influencing an adminis-
tration, would be highly sensitive
to the prospect of having its ac-
tivity reported throughout the
country with resultant national
publicity.
General aim of the Association+
is to impose higher standards of
integrity and good taste on the!
student press by making it more
keenly aware of its grave respon-
sibilities.
Union To Hold
Staff TryoutsE

UNION

SCALE MODEL OF THE AUTOMOTIVE ENGINEERING LABORATORY SCHEDULED FOR CONSTRUCTION ON NORTH CAMPUS
Automotive Lab Set for North Campus

Homecoming
Local photographers and a
coat-checking organization are
needed for Homecoming dance.
Applicants are requested to call
NO ,3-1283 from 7 to 9 p.m.

By CAROL NORTH
An Automotive Engineering La-
boratory, which total cost is esti-
mated at $1,850,000, Is the next
building to be constructed on the
University's North Campus.
Work will begin on the labora-
SL Exchange
Exceeds '53
Sales Record
The Student Legislature Book
Exchange passed the $6700 mark
in sales yesterday to surpass by
over $1200 the fall semester rec-
ord set one year ago.
The Exchange, located in the
quonset hut near Waterman gym,
is expected to break the all-time
mark of $7300 reached last Feb-
ruary.
According to Harvey F reed, as-
sistant director of the Exchange,
there are still plenty of books re-
maining on the shelves. He also
emphasized that books are still
being accepted at the quonset hut

tory and a $1,000,000

nuclear re-I

actor before the year is out, fur-
ther enlarging North Campus.
The new campus already houses
the Mortimer E. Cooley Memorial
Laboratory, erected at a cost of
$1,000,000 and now in operation,
and the Phoenix Memorial Lab-
oratory, now under construction,
a building estimated to be worth
$1,200,000.
Proposal Made
A proposal was made last fall
by Michigan industries to supply
a large number of research pro-
jects if the University's present
engineering facilities were expand-
ed. The automotive industry was
primarily interested in the devel-
opment of a modern automotive
laboratory to replace the one
which is now used.
Although the University was
one of the first Midwestern insti-
tutions to grant a degree in engi-
neering, the physical growth of
the Engineering College drew no
special attention until the recent
north campus.construction.
The University's West Engineer-
ing Building was constructed in'
1902, and the East Engineering
Building in 1923. One of the oldest
buildings on campus, a small build-
ing constructed in 1885 near the
West Engineering Building is used
fo ran automotive laboratory.
Rapid Progress
Despite the lack of physical fa-

cilities, the University's research
program in engineering has pro-
gressed rapidly. In 1920 the En-
gineering Research Institute was
started under the direction of Prof.
See NEW 'U' BUILDINGS, pg. 23
Albert E. White. Last year the in-
stitute did more than $8,000,000
worth of business, with its pro-
gram being carried out largely in
buildings hurriedly erected during
the war near the Willow Run Air-
port.
With the construction on North
Campus, the College of Engineer-
ing's present physical plant on the
main campus will be almost doub-
led.
Engineers Needed
As engineers are in great de-
mand today, industry is ready to

take in the nation's college engi-
neering graduates with tempting
offers. A starting salary of be-
tween $350 and $400 a month on
a training program is not unusual.
Some students are known to get
jobs paying up to $600 monthly,
immediately after graduation.
Jet propulsion and nuclear sci-
ence have opened up further fields
in engineering when vast horizons
were arising in areas of engineer-
ing already well known.
The University's present enroll-
ment in the College of Engineer-
ing is about 2,000. As future stu-
dents become aware of the oppor-.
tunities in engineering and as the
University's physical facilities ex-
pand, a future enrollment of 5,000
is expected.

POT OF GOLD FOLDS:

U' Scout's Million Dollar
Cheek Deflated to $79.80

The proverbial boy scout's good
deed made Robert Finley '56 a
"millionaire" overnight.
Treasurer of the local chapter
of Alpha Phi Omega, the boy scout
service organization, Finley re-
ceived an expected check for $79.80
from the National Boy Scouts of
America for work done last year on

ized that what
serial number
$1,000,079.80.

he mistook for a
actually r e a d

Union staff tryout meetings have for resale and that books needed
been planning for 4:30 p.m. Wed- for freshman courses are especial-
nesday and 7:30 p.m. Thursday in ly desired.
Room 3A of the Union. The Exchange will be open from
Tom Leopold, Union President, 8:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. today and
will speak at the meeting, open to tomorrow.
all undergraduate men interested Any unsold books may be col-
in working on Union staff com- lected from the quonset huts next
mittees. Monday and Tuesday.

Boar in Co-os
$8 per week -- Three meals a day
at the following addresses:
FOR MEN
MICHIGAN HOUSE, 315 North State
NAKAMARA HOUSE, 807 South State
OWEN HOUSE, 1017 Oakland
For information call NO 8-6872
INTER-CO-OPERATIVE COUNCIL... 1017 Oakland

After wild daydreams Finley
returned the check, assuring him-
self that he couldn't spend the
check anyway for the entire chap-
ter must approve any expenditure

a Juvenile Delinquency survey in over five dollars.
Washtenaw county. n The check with the ' crossed
However, on second glance the out returned to Ann Arbor yes-
Belleville pre-med student real- terday, Finlay speculated.
Flowers, Plants, and Corsages IJ
for all occasions
c~~e FLOWERS
34 oute and GIFTS
_ 334 South State Phone NO 3-5049

Union committees include pub-
lic relations, campus affairs, so-
cial, student services, personnel
and administration, University re-
lations, publicity and dances.
Election Issues
The Issues in the November
election will be discussed at the
first in a series of six Ann Arbor
Republican Committee - sponsored
ward and precinct meetings from
7 p.m. to 9 p.m. tonight at the
Committee's headquarters, 118 W.
Liberty.
Prof. Henry Bretten of the polit-
ical science department will speak
on foreign policy and Prof. Charles
Joiner of the Law School will speak
on national issues.

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

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(Continued from Page 4)
7:30 p.m. - Practical Public Speak-
Ing. 1429 Mason Hall. 16 weeks - $18.00.
Paul E. Cairns, Instructor.
7:00 p.m. - Factory Management.
141 School Business Administration. 16
weeks - $18.00. Dale Gilliard, Instruc-
tor.
Registration for these courses may
be made in Room 4501 of the Admin-
istration Building on State Street dur-
ing University office hours, or in Room
164 of the School of Business Adminis-
tration on Monroe Street in the eve-
ning, 6:30 to 9:30, Monday through
Thursday.
Fellowship and Scholarship Avall-
able: The Douglas Aircraft Company
offers a $1,000 Graduate Fellowship and
a $600 Undergraduate Scholarship to ark
outstanding graduate student and a
senior student in Aeronautical, Me-
chanical or Electronics Engineering.
Candidates must be citizens of the
United States. Letters of applicatio4
should be addressed to the Chairmani
of the Department in which the stu-
dent is enrolled, and these will be ac-s
cepted up to and including September
25.
Exhibitions
Museum of Art, Alumni Memorial
Hall. Olivetti: Design in Industry;
Post-war European Photography; Mu-
seum Collections. Museum hours: 9-5
on weekdays, 2-5 on Sundays. The pub-
lic 1sinvited.
Events Today
Museum Movies. "Pueblo Heritage;"
free movie shown at 3 p.m. daily in-

ciuding Sat. and Sun. and at 12:30
Wed., 4th floor movie alcove, Museums
Building, Spet. 21-27.
Choral Union Tryouts. Tryouts for
prospective new members of the chor-
us will continue through today and
Wednesday. Make appointments for au-
ditions at the offices of the University
MusicaltSociety in person, or telephone
University Ext. 2118. The Choral Un-
ion annually gives two performances of
Handel's "Messiah" in December; and
I participates in two May Festival con-
certs with the Philadelphia Orchestra.
Former members in good standing,
who desire to sing again this year,
please fill out application cards at the
offices of the Musical Society.
The Wolverine Soccer Team will have
its first practice this afternoon at the
soccer field, east of the Stadium, at
four o'clock. All interested players are
invited to attend.
Hawaii Club: Students wishing to
get tickets together for the football
games, please meet in front of Bar-
hour Gym on Wed., Sept. 22, between
12:00-12:15 p.m.
Square and Folk Dancing. Tonight
and every Tuesday. Everyone welcome,
including beginners. Grey Austin, call-
er. Lane Hall, 7:30-10:00 p.m.
S.R.A. Council Meeting. Today, 5:10
p.m., Lane Hall. For SRA Officers, de-
partment chairmen, and Presidents
and SRA representatives from all stu-
dent religious groups. Supper included.
The Congregational-ilsciples Guild:
4:30-6:00 p.m., Informal Tea at the
Guild House, 438 Maynard Street,

YOUR PASSPORT
TO SEE THE WORLD
SIX OUTSTANDING COLOR MOTION PICTURES PRESENTED IN PERSON
BY PROMINENT WORLD TRAVELERS ON SUNDAY AFTERNOONS AT 3:00
NEW GUINEA, ISLE OF ADVENTURE . . OCT. 10
ICELAND, CAPRI OF THE NORTH . . . NOV. 14
INTO THE MEXICAN JUNGLES . . . . . DEC. 12

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ACROSS TROPICAL AFRICA
ITALIAN INTERLUDE .

JAN.9

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QUALITY

OTHING

COLOMBIA

CAVALCA

kDE "

. . . . . . FEB. 13
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at Prices You Can Afford to Pay!

TRAVELING CAMERAMEN, DARING ADVENTURERS AND
EXPLORERS REVEAL THEIR EXCLUSIVE DOCUMENTARY FILMS
Only $4.00 for Season Ticket
On Sale at WVahr's Bookstores and Ann Arbor Public Evening School
SINGLE ADMISSION $1.00 ON AFTERNOON OF PERFORMANCE, PATTENGILL AUDITORIUM
To obtain Illustrated Folder - win ,conmbie infor ma/in. write I

Th

e

SUITS 39.50 44.50 ... SPORT COATS 24.50
same RICHMAN BROS. clothes sold coast to coast at the same prices.
MANHATTAN SHIRTS . JOCKEY & BVD UNDERWEAR
rrirrkAa A IA 1CU^re .CIvlE - At*E4rTC

Wed., 4:30
Thur., 8:30

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