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December 07, 1954 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-12-07

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TUESDAY, DECEMBER 7,1954

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE TIMER

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 7,1954 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE

__.. .n T

HolidayI
Door Trim
Provides Air
Of Festivity
By SUE GARFIELD
Familiar to each of us is the
phrase "there's no place like
home."
And it is repeated more often
during the Christmas season than
at any other time of the year, for
home, whether your University ad-
dress or not, is where holiday
memories begin-where we extend
hospitality to friends and relatives.
Beginning with the entranceway,
a door decoration that's simple in
design can be selected, or one
that's more elaborate.
Package Door
One of the more familiar dec-
orations is the door wrapped like
a package. Wide shiny florist's
ribbon and small springs of pine
will make it resemble a huge gift
box, inviting guests to open it and
walk inside. Different lengths of
ribbon or ribbon put on at an angle
give the door an informal look.
A small evergreen tree mounted
on the outside of a door can be a
miniature version of the big family
tree inside. It is necessary to make
sure the tree is anchored securely
to the door and then it is ready for
trimming with lights and silver
tinsel.
Magnificent, colorful wreaths
made of seed pods, fruit, pine
cones and greenery enhance dou-
ble doors, like the ones often found
in apartments. These wreaths are
made by the Boys Republic of
Chino, Calif., and are shipped all
over the country.-
Essence of Christmas
Often the comment is heard,
that we forget the true mean-
ing of Christmas. Although
there is no mention of the holi-
day in the simple prayer for
all faiths of St. Francis of
Assisi, it well expresses the
spirit of the season.
"Lord, make me an instru-I
ment of Thy peace; where there
is hatred, let me sow love;
where there is injury, pardon;
where there is doubt, faith;
where there is despair, hope;
where there is darkness, light;
where there is sadness, joy.
"O Divine Master, grant that
I may not so much seek to be
consoled as to console; to be
understood as to understand;
to be loved as to love. For it is
in giving that we receive, it is
in pardoning that we are par-
doned, and it is in dying that
we are born to eternal life."
-St. Francis of Assisi

Features

Decorations,

Gifts

NONWOWWI

Council Tells
Correct Toys

For

A

ll

Ages

Daily-Dick Gaskill
GAY GREENERY-Boughs of evergreens forming a wreath make
a bright holiday decoration for the front door of the Betsy
Barbour residence.

For a heavenly outdoor scene,
cover a white door panel with sky-
blue waterproof paper, and make
snowflakes of different sizes and
designs. A flurry of glistening
snowflakes and dainty plastic-foam
angels will provide artful contrast
for the door.
Another yuletide tree for a door
can be made of fringed aluminum
foil of any color, secured to a tri-
angular-shaped frame. Construct
the base from coat-hanger wire or
use plywood strips.
A musical door which will de-
light small children can be simply
made by wiring tiny metal instru-
ments to a shiny green Christmas
tree placed in the center of the
door. Gleaming gold cardboard will
make a beautiful background for
the tree.
Plastic Foam Used
The red-and-white-accent door
can be achieved with plastic-foam
mittens or stars combined with
balls, and placed on a background
of pine boughs. For further color,
add a huge red waterproof bow.
A playful-looking plastic-foam
prancing reindeer will make a big
hit with the "small fry." Made of
a sheet of plastic-foam % inch
thick, the figure can be cut out or
bought already made. Tie on a
collar of tiny balls or bells and
mount it against a background of
evergreen.
To share Christmas with neigh-
bors, give the outside of your home
a glorious setting with lights of
many colors and yuletide scenes of
gay or serious tone.
Manger Scene
To re-enact the manger scene of
the first Christmas, build a small
village to represent Bethlehem, and
wire a tiny light through the back

of one building to give a soft glow
to the manger.
Miniature animals can be made
of paper and painted with water
colors. The figures will look realis-
tic if constructed from cardboard
and covered with material with
painted-on highlights.
These are only a few of the many
decorations possible for doors and
front yards. Brighten your home or
room door with Christmas special-
ties to welcome the holiday season.
Children Enjoy
Holiday Planning
Half the fun and sparkle of
Christmas morning lies in seeing
it through the eyes of children. It's
a day that really belongs to them,
so why not let them take part in
the holiday preparations as well
as the day itself?
One of the best ways to do this
without slowing down the necessary
preparations is to let the "small
fry" wrap the gifts that he will
hand or send to others. Youngsters
like to feel that their parents or
older brothers and sisters are put-
ting some responsibility on their
small shoulders.
If, for instance, the gift is light
in weight, it's a simple matter to
cut two socks from any gift paper
and tape the edges together with!
matching colored tape. Or show
youngsters how to wrap each gift
separately in tissue paper, paste
on gummed stars and attach rib-
bons to each box. Then cluster the
gifts together and hang from a
huge bow. These methods are also
good solutions for odd-shaped pack-
ages.

There is a right kind of toy
for every age of childhood, accord-
ing to the Toy Guidance Council,
Inc.
To help people select Christmas
play things best suited to the
child they have in mind, the Coun-
cil, in conjunction with its staff
of prominent educators, has pre-
pared the following guide on the
types of toys children need and
want at each stage of their
growth.
TOY SELECTION GUIDE
For Infants-Up to One Year:
Select toys that are non-toxic
and cleanable-stuffed animals,
materials of plastic or sponge rub-
ber; too big to swallow-inflated
toys, rattles; smooth-edged-toy
blocks and light, easy to grasp-
inflated toys, sponge rubber toys.
For toddlers-One to Two Years:
Select toys that aid in muscular
growth-building blocks; are safe
and cleanable-inflated toys made
of plastic with weighted bases,
stuffed toys with plastic or oil
cloth coverings; develop manipula-
tive skill-'pull toys that make ani-
mal noises and allow imaginative
play-dolls, doll houses and tea
sets.
For Pre-School Age-Two to Five:
Choose toys that inspire crea-
tive play-educational toys that
teach use of tools, toys that can be
taken apart and put together
again; aid physical growth-tri-
cycles, wagons, hobby horses, side-
walk toys; and permit achieve-
ment-paint and puzzle sets.
For Early Childhood-Five to
Seven Years:
Pick toys that give physical ex-
ercise-tricycles, wagons, require
initiative-bead seats, games; pro-
mote constructive interests-erec-
tor sets and allow group play-
house furnishing sets, games like
lotto and potato head.
For Intermediate Childhood --
Seven to Nine Years:
Select toys that stir construc-
tive interests-tool kits and bench-
es, sewing kits, toy musical in-
struments; provide physical exer-
cise - bicycles, doll carriages,
sleds' stimulate dramatic play-
household and store games, elec-
tric trains,
For Advanced Childhood-
Ten Years On:
Choose toys that develop prac-
tical skills-stamp collecting sets,
model airplane sets, musical in-
struments; encourage group ac-
tivities-more advanced games like
chess, monopoly and scrabble;
arouse scientific interests-

A gift she'll cherish long after
Christmas, a robe or pajama
set of luxuriously soft reverie
rayon crepe.. . quilted on warm,
washable Quilticil, a new
Celanese acetate interlining.
Above: Dress-length robe with an
embroidered collar. Navy
and copen, rose or white and
pink. Small, medium, large. 14.95.
Center: Two-piece pajama set
with quilted jacket. Navy
with copen, rose with pink.
Sizes 10 to20. 17.95.
Below: Full-length
wrap robe in navy with
copen, rose with pink.
Sizes 1Oto 20. 17.95.
Matching Turkish
toe slippers. 3.95

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