100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 07, 1954 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-12-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


ilAlGh bl)i

TICK AlICnIiiAN MAIL V

9PITU.4anAv pt iorA

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ -A L Z ~ J J e I JE U E M I L T , i 1 5 4

I

SEE MOMMY KISSING SANTA CLAUS:
"Christmas Behind the Iron Curtain!"
The Joe DiMaggio Calendar!
Get December's SHAFT COLLEGE HUMOR!
Out Today at: Blue Front Cigar Store!
On Campus!

--Daily-Chuck Kelsey
VISIBLE SPEECH: Prof. Gordon Peterson adjusts sound specto-
graph.
'U' Scientists Explore
Word-Picture Speaking

By SHIRLEY CROOG
To most people the spoken word
is to be heard, and the written
word read.
Speech research scientists, how-
ever, have discovered otherwise.
Using "visible speech," pictures
of word sounds, scientists at the
University Speech Research Lab-
oratory are studying various prob-
lems in speech analysis.

a

-1

r

......

11

We Launder Shirts
JUST BIGHTI
Try this Four-Point Shirt Service
offered by Kdyer Model Laundry and Cleaners
1. Shirts washed sparkling clean by our scientifi-
cally controlled formulas.
2. Shirts starched, or not, as you prefer.
3. Shirts ironed to perfection by our experienced
operators.
4. Guaranteed Button Replacement-if your shirt
is returned with even one missing button, tell
us. That shirt plus one other shirt will be laun-
dered free.
KYEII MODEL LAUNDRY
AND CLEANERS
1304 S. University Phone 814 S. State
627 S. Main NO 3-4185 619 Packard

Visible speech is produced by the
sound spectograph. A stylus marks
the frequency of sound vibrations
varying against time. The mark-
ings produce a pattern on a re-
volving metal drum.
Contrast Tones
The heavier the sound intensity,
the darker the lines. Light and
dark lines contrast soft and loud
tones. This variability allows spo-
ken words to be "read."
The University speech labora-
tory is studying the problem of re-
constructing an automatic speech
synthesizer, according to Prof.
Gordon Peterson, editor-elect of
the Journal of Speech and Hear-
ing Disorders.
Speech synthesizers, it is hoped,
will be a part of a machine which
will enable the blind to read. This
device for blind education would
consist of three parts: an auto-
matic print reader to pick up the
words from the page; a computer
to decide which sounds are to be
spoken; and the speech synthe-
sizer to speak the words.
Proving its importance in other
scientific areas, the sound specto-
graph may also enable the deaf to
'hear," through visible patterns
of world sounds. Advances are be-
ing made, too, in speech correc-
tion.
Aids Language Study
Visible speech aids language and
vocal music study. The machine is
important in acoustical measure-
ment and in producing phonetical
symbols.
"Basic research is primary,"
Prof. Peterson added. "The first
objective is to understand the pro-
cesses of vocal sounds formation,
the nature of sound waves, and
how the ear interprets them."
Work has been done on the pho-
netic typewriter, a machine which
produces written words by speak-
ing into it. This research has been
done in connection with "voice
dialing" by the Bell Telephone La-
boratories.

Consumers
MCayControl
Mass Goods
By HARRY STRAUSS
Consumer-cross-section of cul-
ture.
This definition was given by
Prof. Aarre K. Lahti, acting chair-
man of the Department of Art.
The department is sponsoring
the annual Ann Arbor. Confer-
ence, Dec. 9 and 10, which will dis-
cuss the American consumer and
his influence on and reaction to
the design of mass produced goods.
A teacher of product design,
Prof. Lahti expressed his interest
in consumer research.
"The consumer is blamed for
many things but I find that if he
is given reasonable selections, he'll
make better choices," Prof. Lahti
said. An important factor is price,
he noted, for if a consumer finds
a design too expensive, the qual-
ity of the design is not enough to
make up the difference.
I"Taste is neither good nor bad
but is conditioned," Prof. Lahti
added, noting that fear of con-
sumer research leads to sameness.
"New products lead themselves to
anticipation."
Speaking about influences, Prof.
Lahti said that the consumer is not
in a position to design products.
Consumer research gives predica-
tive information about products
for designers.
Prof. Lahti continued to say the
"professional people determine
what product the consumer could
use if he had it. Design depends
upon the behavior and attitude of
consumers."
What keeps the consumer in
line, he said, is the desire for pre-
eminence as well as the desire for
conformity.
Arts Center Play
To Be Held Over
Originally scheduled to close
Sunday, the Dramatics Arts Cen-'
ter production of "The Moon in
the Yellow River" by Denis John-
sion is being held over until next
weekend.
Performances have been set for
8:15 p.m. Thursday, Friday and
Saturday, and there will be a
matinee performance at 2:30 p.m.
Saturday.
The Center's third production,
Oliver Goldsmith's "She Stoops to
Conquer" will open Dec. 16. Run-
ning through Dec. 19, the play
will not be presented the week of
Dec. 23. It will reopen Dec. 30 till
Jan. 9.
The Jean Anouilh translation of
Sophocle's tragedy "Antigone" will
be the fourth presentation of the
season.

By DAVID KAPLAN
"I blame the pre,ss for failure
to give wise counsel," William Mat-
thews, editor and publisher of the
Tuscon Daily Star, commented
yesterday.
As the first speaker in the Uni-
versity Lectures in Journalism,
Matthews noted that the American
press must be more responsible to
its readers than it has in the past.
He criticized the press for con-
fusing its readers by giving them
too much information, arousing

e,

Matthews Details U.S. Press Failure

emotions unnecessarily and not
selecting the news to be printed.
Drawing on his experiences dur-
ing his numerous visits to the Or-
ient and Russia, Matthews siad
that we are "exaggerating Rus-
sian strength and mistaking So-
viet intentions."
"We must learn to live with the
threat of war indefinitely," Mat-
thews said, "but Russia lacks the
enorm( sly greater food, morale
and railroad resources to start a
war."
Discussing the United Nation's

t

role in world affairs, Matthews
noted that the UN is a "debating
society, with each nation respond-
ing according to its own interests.
The UN is as helpless as an infant,
but just as indispensable."
"The day of the economically
sovereign state is coming to an
end," Matthews said, "and the res-
ponsibility of educators, the press
and all thinkers is to recognize
fundamental duties. A free press
cannot be maintained unless there
is a free society."
A1

EI

I

I
I
Ii

(Paid Political Adv
Vote to keep
RON RICHARDSON
on S.L.
(Paid Political Adv.)

L

.. .

D on
Get yo
ri

t Be Caught Sleeping!
WA ]UP

I

I.

ur 'Ensian before the price
e from $6.00 to $6.50

Y

?iF

i'

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan