100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 21, 1954 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-09-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 1954

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE SEVEN

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 1954 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE SEVEN

Fiaces

inal Workouts efore uskie Contest

.1

Giants Capture National League Flag'
With Maglie's 74 Win Over Brooks

Varsity Trounces Reserves
In Final Major Scrimmage

SOONERS VICTORIOUS:

Favorites Win as Grid Season Opens

I

~ti_

BROOKLYN () - The New York
Giants buried Brooklyn Monday
night and danced a jog on the
grave to celebrate the clinching of
the National League pennant in
the park where they're loved least
- Ebbets Field. Sal Maglie presid-
ed with a five hitter while his
mates whooped it up with a 7-1
victory.

It was fitting that the 37-year-old
"Barber" with the long sideburns
was the man to nail down the
Giants' 15th flag. Maglie shoul-
dered the heavy burden through-
out the season, pitching the games
that had to be won, facing the
toughest clubs in the roughest sit-
uations.
And it also was fitting that the
Giants marched into a rich World
Series date with Cleveland over
the prostrate form of the Dodgers,
the team that was supposed to
waltz to its third straight pennant.
Mays Leads Hitters
Willie Mays, the Giants' sensa-
tional centerfielder whose return
from the Army last spring ignited
the ball club, finally caught up
with Duke Snider and took over
the league batting lead with three
hits for a .344 average.
When Sal Maglie threw to Whitey
Lockman to retire Roy Campanel-
la for the final out in the ninth, it
touched off a wild scene in mid-
field. Lockman jumped piggy back
on Maglie and Giants' fans among
the 26,982 customers fought each
other to drape their arms around
Maglie's back. Special police hus-
tIed Sal off the field through the
Brooklyn dugout, the shortest way
to the clubhouse where another
screaming welcome greeted him.
The victory climaxed a dramatic
defense of first place by the Giants
who, time after time, had to hurl
back repeated challenges by the
Dodgers as well as Milwaukee's
Braves.
Picked for Fourth
It was a glorious triumph for
the underdog Giants, picked by a
majority of the experts to finish
fourth or fifth in pre-season pre-
dictions. It also was a great vic-
tory° for Manager Leo Durocher,
whose job was considered in jeop-
ardy in many quarters because of
the club's dismal fifth-place fin-
ish, 35 games behind the Dodgers,
in 1953.
Reminiscent of their 1951 pennant
Major League
Standings
AMERICAN LEAGUEj

O By DAVE LIVINGSTON
Team VctoryDaily Sports Editor t
In all respects, the Giants' vic- From now on it's all for real. t
tory was a team triumph. Except The Varsity rolled over the Re-t
for Willie Mays, Johnny Antonelli serves, 34-0, Saturday as Michi-
and Alvin Dark, it was a club with gan's gridders staged their lastx
no outstanding stars. With due maocimae bfoe te
ed t hi ti n oithdumajor scrimmage before they 1
credit to this trio, no one player plunge into a schedule where ev-
was solely responsible for the Gi- er mdoc could spell e-
ants sucess.ery missed block could spell de-
ants' success. feat.j
True, Mays, with his spectacular If the innumerable pre-season
fielding, throwing and power hit- fo tse worthte pr on
ting, was an inspirational leader;
Dark, with his clutch hitting and which they are printed, the Wol-
capacity as a team player, was :
the driving force; and Antonelli,
with his brilliant pitching against
the top clubs, was the staff "stop-
per.'
Players like Don Mueller, Hank Y
Thompson, Davey Williams, Whitey i
Lockman and bench warmers Dus-
ty Rhodes and Bobby Hoffman all
contributed handsomely. E v e n
Monte Irvin, despite a long batting
slump, came through with game-'
winnipg hits on numerous occa-
- sions.
9 A great deal of credit, too, must
f be given Durocher who, according
h to veterans Dark and Lockman,
v did his best managing since taking
d over the Giant reins in the middle
- of the 1948 season. Leo's handling
e of the club, his ability to rally his
forces, his choice of the correct
g pinch hitters and relief pitchers,
e was superb. A gambler at heart, TONY BRANOFF
Durocher time after time went ... knee injury healed
s against "the book," only to come
. up with the correct answers. verines are destined to lose at
least five games, for five of their

8
t
(
ix

By BOB JONES stebl ntetnwsteol T h uke
though he sat out Saturday's The Oklahoma Sooners opened gave the Sooners the ball on the ton was the only TD the Huskies
scrimmage, with the bad knee} their 1954 football season with a Bear 46. A fast moving ground could put across.
that has bothered him all fall re- vengeance Saturday, whipping a march gave Oklahoma its final Maryland Downs Kentucky, 20-0
turned to practice yesterday, and tough University of California tally, with Bob Herndon going over The Maryland Terrapins, top col-
indications are that he will be squad at Berkeley by a score of 27 the line from the 3. legiate squad in 1953, played sharp
ready to start against the Huskies. to 13. Larson Leads Bears football Saturday afternoon as they
Although Bates won't make the The Sooners, picked by many to The Golden Bears' pair of TD's downed the Kentucky Wildcats at
trip to Seattle, he is expected to be the top collegiate team of the were the result of the efforts of Lexington by a score of 20-0. The
be up to par for the home opener year, played heads-up ball all the passing wizard Paul Larson. The Terps showed a smooth aerial at-
with Army in two weeks. way. Weak kicks on the part of the sharpshooting quarterback, w h o tack combination in the form of
Baldacci at Fullback Bears set up two Oklahoma TD's, collected 1,431 passing yards in quarterback Ronnie Boxold and end
and a Cal fumble, recovered on the 1953, scored the Bears' first tally Russell Dennis. The duo clicked
Lou Baldacci ran well from his 25, set up a third. on a quarterback sneak in the sec- I on a 31 yard pass play in the third
ne fullback spot asS caturd te Oklahoma Scores First ond period, and engineered an 85 quarter for the score.
oucd n Saty.T e Sooner quarterback Gene Calame yard passing attack in the fourth Maryland, picked for third in the
20-poundjuniorhasaltrnatedrSonerqarb dthaceeCnda for the final California score. 1954 Associated Press predictions,
between full and quarterback, drew first blood in the second quar- r
ter after a bad Cal kick gave Okla- A crowd of 25,600 at Seattle, showed power on the ground in the
where he played regularly last homa the ball on the Bear 33. In Wash., saw a green Huskie eleven person of halfback Charlie Waller.
season. the third period Calame started the down an even greener Utah team Waller set up a Terp TD in the
His work at fullback has been game's most spectacular play by by a feeble 7-6 margin. The Hus- third quarter with a 29 yard punt
exceptional as he has become per- pitching out to halfback Buddy kies, who will be the first team to return, and later ran 23 yards for
haps the best spinner Michigan has Leake. Leake passed to end Max meet the Michigan Wolverines in another Maryland score.
had from under the single-wing Boydson on the 43 and Boydson I the infant 1954 season, put on a The University of Texas took re-
since Jack Weisenberger. ' went all the way. The play covered display of slippery fingers, but venge for a 20-7 beating last sea-
With Baldacci at fullback Dune 87 yards. were equally matched by the Red- son at the hands of LSU, and also
MeIn the final period, the 58,000 skins in the fumble column. Both showed itself to be packed with
McDonald has seen most of thei fans in attendance saw Sooner teams lost the ball four times, and power, as the Longhorns thrashed
Maddock, quarte ph oreo m Ch Gene Mears recover a fumble deep both had five fumbles. the Bayou Tigers 20-6 Saturday at
Iri rnmr p f:.~in Bear territory. Calame's able A fifteen yard touchdown pass Austin. Texas totaled 273 yards

1
t
f

LEO DUROCHER
..- a new feather

drive when they roared on to vic
tory after an early 11-game losing
streak, the '54 Giants got up of
the floor to gain the club's 15th
flag since 1904. On June 9, New
York tied Brooklyn for the lea
and six days later took sole pos
session of first place, never to lose
despite numerous assaults.
On four separate occasions, big
Giant leads were reduced to the
danger point. Each time, however
Durocher's club won the games
they had to and rebuilt new leads

i

1

Indians Approach Record;
Spahn Gains Twentieth Win'

,nine opponents are rated among
the top twenty collegiate outfits in
the country, while Michigan is
generally unranked.
But Coach Bennie Oosterbaan
and his staff haven't been putting
their charges through stiff drills

r

W
Cleveland ....109
New York ...100
Chicago .... 92
Boston ..... 65
Detroit ......65
Washington . 64
Baltimore ... 52
Philadelphia - 491

L Pct.
40 .732
49 .671
58 .613]
83 .439- 4
84 .4364
84 .432 4
98 .347
100 .329 #

GB
9
171,
431/
44
441/
571/
60

The Cleveland Indians came,
within one game of tying and two
of breaking the American League
record for games won in a season
last night when they downed the
Chicago White Sox, 7-4, at Cleve-
land municipal stadium.
Two of the former greats of
American League pitching com-
bined to win for the Tribe. Bob
Feller, starter and winner, was re-
lieved in the seventh by his former
arch-rival, Hal Newhouser, who
opposed Feller in some of the
greatest pitching duals in history
while he was with Detroit's Tigers.
The Indians scored six runs in
the first three innings to give Fel-
ler a comfortable lead, but he fal-
tered in the seventh when the Sox
tallied twice. Ray Narleski came
to the aid of Newhouser in the
eighth when the Sox scored one
more run. Larry Doby and Vic
Wertz homered for the Indians in
their eleventh straight victory.
Joins Immortals
Warren Spahn became the first
left-handed pitcher in modern
baseball to have six twenty-win
seasons as he pitched the Milwau-
kee Braves to a 6-2 victory over
All men interested in cheer-
leading report to the Intramur-
al Building at four o'clock any
day this week.
--Bill Winkler
the Cincinnati Reds in the first
game of their double-header at Mil-
waukee yesterday afternoon.
Spahn thus joins Christy Mathew-
son, Grover Cleveland Alexander,
and Mordecai Brown, all right
handers, as the only pitchers in
modern majorleague history to
win 20 games' for six or more sea-
sons. In the second game of the
twin bill the Reds came back to
down the Braves, 3-1, with a two
run first inning and one in the
ninth.
T he BostonaRed Sox maintained
their one game hold on fourth
place in the American League race
as rookie Tom Brewer yielded but
four hits to beat the Philadelphia
Athletics, 5-2, in their game played
at Fenway Park yesterday after-
noon.
Williams Homers
Ted Williams slammed his 28th
home run of the year to move into
second place in that race despite
missing 37 games because of a bro-
ken collar bone.
In the National League the St.
Louis Cardinals exploded for five

_ since September 1 for nothingIf
runs in the 10th inning to defeat anybody whips the Wolverines it
the Chicago Cubs, 7-2, last night I won't be the prognosticators.
and thereby climb into fifth place Open Without Bates
by less than half of a percentage With the exception of center
point. . Jim Bates, who is temporarily
Seven of the Cardinals' sixteen laid up with pneumonia, every
hits .were doubles, as St. Louis man on the squad should be ready
beat Paul Minner for the first to go in the opener with Wash-
time this season after six straight ington at Seattle Saturday.
defeats at the hands of the Chicago Right half Tony Branoff, al-
lefty.
In o t h e r American League
games, Detroit edged Baltimore,
4-3, while the Washington Senators More Sportson
slipped past New York, 3-2. 1

{
,$
r

cago, periormea wei zam uray as
he tossed a 22-yard scoring pass.
Shift Poses Problem
The shift of Baldacci to full-
back poses a problem to Ooster-
baan, for with McDonald essen-
tially a "T" quarterback, although
his blocking from the single-wing
has improved tremendously, it is
impossible to utilize Baldacci's
spinning prowness and at the same
time take fullest advantage of Mc-
Donald's passing from the "T."
Dan Cline continues to hold
down the vital tailback spot, al-
though sophomore Terry Barr has
run well from the position, and no
longer appears to be hampered by
the knee injury that put him out
of commission last spring.
The Huskies will probably face
a starting line consisting of Ron
Kramer and Gerry Williams at
end, Art Walker and John Morrow
at tackle, guards Ted Cachey and
Jim Fox. and John Peckham fill-
ing in for Bates at center. Bal-'
dacci and Morrow have both
showed promise in handling the
linebacking chores.

generalship took Oklahoma to the
Cal 2, where Leake smacked overj
for the score.
Another weak California kick
y 1
Sooners Top
Season's First
Football Poll
Results of the Associated Press'
first grid poll of the season Monday
found Oklahoma, winner over Cal-
ifornia on Saturday by a 27-13
score, ranked well ahead of still-
untested runner-up, Notre Dame,
as the nation's top football team.
.Here is the list of the top teams
with first-place votes in parenthe-
ses:
1-Oklahoma (56) ............789
2-Notre Dame (11)........613
3-Maryland (9)............571
4-Texas (3) ...............541
5-Georgia Tech (2)........375
6-Illinois................273
7-Michigan State..........237
8-UCLA (2)..............232
9-Mississippi (1) ............152
10-(Tie) Baylor ...............142
10-(Tie) Wisconsin ............142

by
l~9affl°en

Pages 14 and 15

BOLDEN, CAROLINE STAND OUT
Illinois, MSC Feature Powerful RunningAttacks
CHICAGO (R - One of the
greatest running attacks ever game he contributed gains totaling two should give the Illini football's help if the Spartans are to have a
spawned in the Big Ten will be 149 yards. nost feared punch. winning season.
unleashed by Illinois Saturday in The explosive Woodson also is a Sophs To See Action To supplant this situation are
its season football inaugural demon on pass defense. Caroline's understudy probably Earl Morrall and John Matsock,
against sturdy Penn State, a pride If Caroline and Woodson are could make any first string in the quarterback contenders. At full-
of the East. stopped, Illinois still can keep go- Big Ten. He i§ sophomore Harry back is Evan Slonac's understudy,
Seldom has a team been so high- ing. Jefferson, a 5-10, 180-pound all- Jerry Planutis, who will probably
ly touted for ball-carrying poten- Mickey Bates, who ran and state prep star from White Plains, inherit Slonac's extra-point kick-
tial as the Illini, who were led to snared passes for 687 yards to N.Y. As a runner, he is rated on a ing chores in addition.
the conference co-championship supplement Caroline last year and par with the rest. Two powerful guards, Henry
last year by J. C. Caroline. scored 11 touchdowns, has been New Michigan State football Bullough and Ferris Hallmark,
Halfback Caroline broke Red shifted to fullback, coach, Duffy Daugherty, beginning both in the group with Bolden:
Grange's yard-gaining mark in His inside smashes, coupled with his first season at East Lansing which averaged half a game, will
1953 with a total offense record of the flanking speed of the other finds a glaring lack of experience be stalwarts in the State line.
1,670 yards and led the nation his greatest headache of the mo- Fe oywl rbbyhl
in rushing with 1,256. He is back ment.oFred Rody will probably hold
this season, eager as ever to ac- M otley s Injury Against Iowa, a team with a doyreturnethe center posiBadtion althoughay
celerate. supply of lettermen and picked by give J te endkposty
Caroline will be a marked man, Ends Grid Career many to win the Big Ten crown, give hinastle. hs nd psts,
but if opponents stop him it is Daugherty will have only three always strongholds on the State!
questionable they will stop Illi- CLEVELAND (.) - Marion Mot- returnees that averaged over a team appear to be well taken care
nois. ley, the greates' fullback'who ever half of each game in playing time. of this year as well.
Woodson Faster than Caroline wore a Cleveland Browns uniform, Bolden Rated All-American
At right half is Abe Woodson, retired Monday because of an in- Among the backs, LeRoy Bolden
6-1, 182-pound sophomore who is jured knee. is the only regular from last year's
faster than Caroline. He won the Motley, 34, made coach Paul Rose Bowl winner. Although he is
70-yard low hurdle title in the Big Brown's fullback trap play the ter- a cinch for All-American honors
Ten indoor track meet last March ror of pro football in his earlier if he repeats last year's perform-
in :07.9. In the spring football years. ance, he will undoubtedly need

you just can't beat...

Kharafleece

f r o m Washington quarterback rushing, most of which came in
Sandy Lederman to end Jim Hous- three long touchdown drives.

C JA TZEN

This is the fabric

that thinks it's cashmere-the

YESTERDAY'S GAMES
Boston 5, Philadelphia 2
Cleveland 7, Chicago 4
Detroit 4, Baltimore 3
Washington 3, New York 2
TODAY'S GAMES
Detroit atDBaltimore (Night)
Chicago at Cleveland (Night)
Washington at N e w Y o r k
(Night)
Philadelphia at Boston (2)
* * *
NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pet. GB
New York...... 94 54 .635 -
Brooklyn ... 88 61 .591 6%/
Milwaukee .. 87 63 .580 8
Cincinnati .. 73 78 .483 22/
St. Louis .... 71 78 .477 232
Philadelphia . 69 77 .473 24%/
Chicago ......60 90 .400 35
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
St. Louis 7, Chicago 2
New York 7, Brooklyn 1
Milwaukee 6-1, Cincinnati 2-3
Only games scheduled
TODAY'S GAMES
New York at Brooklyn
Cincinnati at Milwaukee
St. Louis at Chicago (2)
Rittsburgh at Philadelphia (2)

remarkably wrinkle-resistant, washable, soft and
rugged Kharafleece that belongs only to Jantzen.i
Deep comfort-cut armholes, ribbed waist that
holds its shape. New lineup of masculine colors.
11.95,
607 EAST LIBERTY
MICHIGAN THEATRE BUILDING
At ~--
-"

NEW SHIPMENTS of
USED TEXTBOO KS
arriving daily!1
NEW BOOKS IF YOU PREFER
For that hard-to-find textbook

..........
it 4
V:
Oxfod Clth BttonDownShin

I1

DAILY PICK-UP
and DELIVERY!
Pick-up stations at
. EAST QUAD
* SOUTH QUAD

I

try I
I q .I

.

is

f'1

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan