100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 05, 1954 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-12-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

. 1 -

-3

SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 5, 1954

4 ,

STUDENT WORK HONORED:
Prizes Awarded in Union Art Exhibit

Hopwood Play Royalties
Aid 'U' Literary Writers.

The second annual Union Stud-*
ent Art Exhibit will open at 2:30
p.m. today in the Terrace Room
of the Union.
Scheduled to run through Dec.
15, the exhibit includes 86 stud-
ent oils, prints, watercolors and
drawings and eight pieces of sculp-
ture, making it more than double
the size of last year's show.
First prizes of $20 gift certifi-
cates from local merchants were
awarded Sally Huber, '57 A&D,
for her oil painting, James H. An-
throny, '55 A&D, for his water-
color "Reflections," Sharon Rich,
'55 A&D, for her print "The Bar-
gaining Table" and Thomas S.
Welton for his torso of a wo-
man.
Second prizes of $10 gift cer-
tificates were won by Sally Angell,
Grad., in oil and prints, David
Rohn, '56 A&D, in watercolors and
Sam Harper; '55 A&D, in sculp-.
ture.

F

(Paid Political Adv.)

Vote to keep
RON RICHARDSON
on S.L.
(Paid Political Adv.}

-Daily-Dean Morton
PRIZE WINNING SCULPTURE from the Union art exhibit. A
torso by Thomas Welton (first)) 'Women at the Racetrack' by
Sam Harper and 'Dancing Nude' by Anne Goodyear.

By LOU SAUER
Every time actress Billie Nelson
wiggles through a performance of
the current production of "Get-
ting Gertie's Garter," she is aid-
ing hopeful writers at the Univer-
sity in furthering their careers.
Avery Hopwood, co-author of the
play and a Michigan alumnus,
left one-fifth of his estate to the
regents to sponsor annual con-
tests for the encouragement of
creative writing. Royalties from
his 33 plays make up the bulk of
the bequest.
Hopwood was a master of the
light comedy, and such plays as
"Goodnight, Ladies," "Gertie" and
"The Gold Digger" are still re-
membered and occasionally reviv-
ed. Few know that he originated
the phrase "gold-digger" to des-
ignate "that type of Broadway
chorus girl who takes a lot and*
gives nothing."
His success was met with sur-
prise by his exclassmates. One of
them from a small writing class,
Mrs. Walter Pillsbury of Ann Ar-
bor, remembered Hopwood as a
"shy, seemingly unhappy young
man.
"Heawas very reserved, and did
not have in the least an engaging
personality," she said. We had
very little recognition from him
in class, and no outside contact
at all. We were all surprised when
the comedies came out and we
were sad to see Avery's deteriora-
tion accompany his success."
Addiction To Drink
The "deterioration" Mrs. Pills-
bury referred to was his addiction
to drink. On his last visit to the
University in 1924, after giving a
send-off party to the graduating
members of Phi Gamma Delta,
he climbed inebriated into a taxi
and said, "If you never see me
again, remember me this way,
boys."
In 1931 when the Hopwoods
were first announced students
wondered who their benefactor
was. The only answer they could
find was that Hopwood was an
alumnus who had made a million
Sollars on bedroom farces. No bi-
ography is available to try to tell
us why he was so unhappy that
he would rather be reIembered
drunk than sober.

DAILY
OFFICIAL
B ULLE TIN

AVERY HOPWOOD

the Department of Speech productio
of Elmer Rice's Broadway hit comed
Dream Girl, to be presented Wed
Sat., Dec. 8-11. Tickets, $1.50 - $1.20
90c. Special student rate of 75c in el
feet. Wed. and Thurs.
Candidates Open Houses, Fall Ele
tions, 19541 Mon., Dec. 6, addition,
open house, South Quad, West Loung
at 6:30 p.m. Tues., Dec. 7, comple
listing.
Delta Upsilon - 6:30 p.m.
Pi Beta Phi - 5:00 p.m.
Couzens - 7:30 p.m.
Kappa Kappa Gamma - 5:15 p.m.
Newberry Hall - 5:15 p.m.
Barbour Hall - 5:15 p.m.
Martha Cook - 6:45 p.m.
South Quad, East Lounge - 6:30 p.n
East Quad, Green House Loung4
6:30 p.m.
Folk Dance Group, emphasizing tra
ditional dances of many countrie
Led by Jud McGehee, former directs
of the Stanford University folk dani
ers. Every Mon., 7:30-10:00. Lane Ha
Re creation Room.
La P'tite Causette will meet Mon
Dec. 5 from 3:30 - 5:00 p.m. in the le
room of the Michigan Union cafeteri
Science Research Club meeting, Rac
ham Amphitheatre, 7:30 p.m., Tues
Dec. 7. "Bones, Joints and Body Locc
motion," Wilfrid T. Dempster, Anatc
my; "Microspectroscopy, A Tool for B
ophysical Research," Darwin Wood, B
ophysics. Election of new member
Dues received after 7:10 p.m.
Mathematics Club will meet Tue
Dec. 7, at 8:00 p.m. in the West Cor
ference Room, Rackham Building. Pro
R. M. Thrall will speak on "Mathema
ics and Decision Processes."
Meeting of the Academic Freedo
Sub Commission Tues., Dec. 7 at 4:
p.m. in Room 3R of the Union.
Sigma XI. Wed., Dec. 8, 8:00 p.r
Rackham Amphitheater. Visiting le
turer, Dr. Thomas J. E. O'Neill for D
Robert P. Glover of Philadelphia, Pe
will speak on "Surgery's New Fro
tier-The Heart." Public invited. R
freshments.
"After Gandhi-What?" a discussi
of Gandhi's Constructive Program an
what is being done about it. Sponsori
by the India Student Association, ti
Fellowship of Reconciliation, the Won
en's International League for Pea
and Freedom, and the Young Friend
Fellowship. Panel members: India
journalist Robi Chakravarty, Bhooda
worker Pat McMahon, author, Englii
professor John Muehl; economic
James Morgan, moderator. Room
KLMN, Michigan Union. 8:00 p.m. Fr
Dec. 10.
Spring .Weekend
Central committee members f
Spring Weekend will hold a mee
ing at 5 p.m. Monday in Rm. 3
of the Union.

n
l3.
I.-
C-
:te
n.
;e
a-
s
or
c-
III

-4,

Make FOLLETT'S
your Christmas Shopping
Headquarters
-4. BOOKS for ALL AGES
GAMES --TOYS, RECORDS-- PENS
STATIONERY TYPEWRITERS
MICHIGAN SOUVENIRS LEATHER GOODS
Christmas Cards 5c and up
Seals and Wrapping
SHOP and SAVE at
FOLLETT
State Street at North University

"

noel

nuoderne

9 p.M.

to 1 a.rn.

december 11th
south quadrangle
$2.50 per couple
semi-formal

(Continued from Page 4)
dent center. Dr. Lichtwardt will be
the speaker.
First Baptist Church. Sun., Dec. 5.
9:45 a.m. Student Class studies Matth-
ew, 11:00 a.m. Sermon, "Faith for our
day," 3:30 p.m. Cabinet meeting at
Beth's house, also dessert. 312 North
Thayer one block East of State, two
and a half blocks North of Huron. 6:45
p.m. Guild Christmas program.
Episcopal StudentrFoundation. Can-
terbury House breakfasts following
both the 8:00 and 9:00 a.m. services.
"Faith of the Church" lecture series,
4:30 p.m. at Canterbury House. Student
Supper Club. 6:00 p.m. at Canterbury
House, followed by a movie, "The
Hope of the East." Coffee Hour at the
Student Center following 8:00 p.m.
Evensong.
Informal Folk Sing at Muriel Lester
Co-op, 900 Oakland, Sun., Dec. 5 at
8:00 p.m.
Coning Events
Industrial Relations Club. "Govern-
ment Mediation in Strikes" will be dis-
cussed by the Hon. George E. Bowles,
Chairman of the Michigan Labor Medi-
ation Board, Mon., Dec. 6, at 4:00 p.m.,
in Room 131, School of Business Admin-
istration.
WCBN-East Quad-Meeting for all
staff members on Mon., Dec. 6, at 7:15
pin, in the council rooms at East
Quad. Voting on the constitution.
Lydia, Mendelssohn Theatre Box Of-
fice opens Mon., Dec. 5, 10:00 a.m., for

It
k-
s., e
$.,FOR CHRISTMAS
n-
t-
:04 For Woe n..]0
~ 98 50
'- >
T Style Illustrated
- *~'~'~ Lambskin Everett
°d Red,'Lt. Blue, Pink
.$4.95
n-
'xe t,
m
s,
00 For Moen.
TanEk oc
it-
Kn - -_ - Sheepskin Lined
$6.95
CAMPUS BOOTERY
304 SOUTH STATE
ce

41

:.

1

danny sheahan trio& noveaires
Ha
th
We
Se 4

Honor Petitions
Petitions for the Engineering
onor Council are available on
e bulletin board inside the
est Engine Arch and must be
turned to Mrs. Delany in
an Emmons' office before 5
m. Friday.

COEDS:
it's Haircuts at a
moment's notice!!
M 6 stylists to please you,
at your convenience
The Daseola Barbers
near Michigan Theatre

t ... - -.... . - _ . .

&ME=16M

. _ _ _ __ . _.__a.. _ _ _ _ _____ __ .. ____ __.._ ... ._._.__.__w....

(PAID POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT).

Vote

for

COMMON

SENSE

PARTY

CANDIDATES

.d1

CANDIDATES
JOAN BRYAN
CHARNIE BUTMAN
CAL COVELL
BILL HANEY
BOB LEACOCK
SUE LEVY
ROBERT LISS
GEORGE LITWIN
PAUL MUNDINGER
JANET NEARY
SI SILVER
SALLY STAPLES

THE UNIVERSITY MUST PROMOTE AN ATMOSPHERE IN WHICH STUDENTS HAVE
THE OPPORTUNITY to meet and live with other students of different races, religions, and
national backgrounds. This contact on an equal basis is the best means of alleviating the
misunderstandings that exist among people, and is a significant part of the eductional
experience. It is particularly important that the University itself not condone discrimination
against members of minority groups, for this not only violates the spirit of the democratic
way of life, but also detracts from the values of a higher education.
In regard to discrimination, the CSP platform states:
We believe that no racial, religious, or ethnic considerations should be used in placing
students in University housing units, except on the request of the individual student. We
will work to change the housing questionnaire so that the opplying person is asked 1.)
whether he would OBJECT to rooming with a person of g different religious, racial, or

ethnic background and 2.) whether he would PREFER to room with a person of a different
racial, religious, or ethnic background
We don't believe that the need for new housing is an excuse for allowing new groups with
discriminatory clauses to be established on campus.
THE NEED FOR NEW HOUSING COULD BE SOLVED by the establishment on campus
of fraternities and sororities without discriminatory clauses. The problem could also be
alleviated by allowing more students to live in off-campus housing, and by the utilization of
more private homes as University residences for men and women.
The CSP also advocates the use of the "Michigan House Plan" as the basis for future
growth of the residence hall system. This concept means small self-sufficient living units
with their own staff and house government and including their own social, study, and eating
facilities.

CANDIDATES
JOAN BRYAN
CHARNIE BUTMAN
CAL COVELL
BILL HAN EY .
BOB LEACOCK
SUE LEVY
ROBERT LISS
GEORGE LITWIN
PAUL MUNDINGER
JANET NEARY
SI SILVER
SALLY STAPLES

A mutual interest in responsible student government led to the forming of the Common Sense Party, a
student political party organized to promote its goals through united efforts. CSP offers a sloe of com-
petent, active candidates pledged to a practical platform. If elected, they must work together for the
achievement of these specific objectives.

OUR GOALS CAN BE ACHIEVED by an intelligent handling of the
Student Legislature so that:
SL consults with Ann Arbor, administration, faculty, and student
groups most concerned with a desired change.
SL obtains complete factual information on which to base a deci-
sion prior to making that decision. CSP will conduct surveys of the
opinions of the various segments of the University community by

It is the University's responsibility to promote the free exchange of ideas and the
individual's opportunity to discover his own truths. To this end, it must make available
to students all points of view, and must resist those pressures that insist that the
unorthodox must not be heard. It must allow its students and faculty their rights
as citizens, so long as they do not claim to represent the University in their activities.
CSP believes that these principles are vital to the meaningful existence of the
University and must be guarded more carefully in these strained times when national
unity is confused with national unanimity. Accordingly, the CSP platform states:
We believe that political, economic and religious beliefs should not be criteria for the
hiring and firing of a faculty member, so long as he does not attempt to influence
others through his position as a teacher.
We believe that students should be free to hear any speaker of speech of their choice,
The University also must develop students for citizenship, by teaching them to
handle responsibility. It is valuable training for them to participatein making the
decisions which affect their educations, The University itself will benefit, too, if
students share in the governing of their own affairs. Decisions in the University
affect the interests of these 18,000 students as well as the faculty, the administration,
and the people of the state of Michigan. In keeping with these beliefs, the CSP
platform says:
We will seek extended closing hours in women's residences, with responsibility fo
their enforcement placed on the student governmental groups within the housing units.
All cases concerning the possible dismissal of students ought to go before a student
judiciary that is furnished with all the information possessed by the University. The
student judiciary's decision ought to be respected in full by the University.
We will continually seek improvement of the student judiciary, so that it will have
more freedom and authority.

We will pressure for a "dead" weekend

prior to the final exam-

ination period although this

may exclude

the possibility

of

a

meaningful" commencement.
We will seek a reappraisal of University regulations in order to pro-
duce realistic and respected rules.
f 'We believe that the University ought to build a Student Activities
center which 'is large enough to fill the needs of all activities and
which will be separate from any existing University building.
# We hope that the International Center, except for its counseling
and legal advisory functions, will eventually become unnecessary as
all students work together in various organizations of mutual interest.

utilizing the facilities of the Survey Research Center

to assure

accurate results.'
SL continually presses for realization of its viewpoint, rather thanj
allowing a single setback to deter it from its objective.

R ..___ _.

i

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan