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September 21, 1954 - Image 5

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-09-21

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TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 1954

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

i*AGE MT

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 1954 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE FIVE

Near_-,

SL PROGRAM:

Exchange Students Meet

The first two participants in
4. the Student Legislature exchange
program with the Free University
of Berlin met each other for the
first time Saturday, then parted
,o. resume activities at their own
universities.
Bernd Rissman, the German stu-
dent from Berlin left Ann Arbor
Sunday to return to Germany aft-
er a year of study here. Bill Al-
len, '55, had just arrived on cam-
pus after a similar year of study
in Berlin.
Rissman, a Business administra-
tion student, heard of the SL plan
in Berlin last September, 1953,
applied and was accepted. He ar-
rived here in October and was
given room and board at the Pi
Laxnbda Phi fraternity. In the
second semester Rissman stayed
at the Chi Psi lodge.
Tuition and certain incidental
expense was supplied by the Uni-
versity, while other incidental ex-
penses was given to him by the
fraternities.
Campus Orientation
His orientation and integration'
into campus social and academic
life came mainly through his
friends in the fraternities.
"I felt at home immediately,"
Rissman said. "The others soon
regarded me as one of them, and
I began to feel that way,. too.'
What impressed Rissman most,'
he said, were the little things that
Americans take o much for
granted. He felt that he wasn't
here to learn only in a classroom.
He wanted to meet and know the
people and the country which he

Williams Set
To Visit YD's
Governor G. Mennen Williams
will be guest speaker at the open-
ing meeting of the Young Demo-
crats on Sept. 29 in the Rackham
Bldg.
The club plans to invite other
state and local Democratic can-
didates to address the group be-
fore fall elections. Another acti-
vity of the club this fall will bet
to aid the Ann Arbor Democratic
party in getting people to regis-
ter for the vote.
Ralph Goldberg, '56' president
of the YD's, added that the club
is willing to debate the Young
Republicans "on any issue, at any
time."
Perhaps the two clubs could
schedule a series of debates, panel
discussions and forums through-
out the year to inform University
students not affiliated with either
political party the major beliefs
of both parties, Goldberg said.

I

A contract for construction of a

I <

two-story addition to the Michigan
Union may be awarded at tomor-
row's Board of Regents meeting.
Bids for the building are now un-
der consideration, according to F.
C. Kuenzel, Union general man-
ager, but must be given final ap-
proval by the Regents.
Estimated cost of the addition
is $2,250,000.
90% Tunnel Completed
About 90 per cent of the heating
tunnel and other plumbing work
Campis NAACP
Chapter To Meet
The campus chapter of the. Na-
tional Association for the Ad-
vancement for Colored People will
hold an organizational meeting
today in the Union.
The meeting is open to the
public.

i

has been completed, Kuenzel said.
Construction time is estimated at
six to eight months, once the con-
tract is let.
Official authorization for the ad-
dition was given by the Regents
at their Jan. 15 meeting this year.
Expansion plans for the Union or-
iginated in 1946, however, and a
modified version was approved by
the Regents in 1950.
Construction was never started
because of other University build-
ing projects and the Korean war.
Plans for expanding and* remod-
eling the food facilities include en-
larging the basement cafeteria, the
main dining room facilities and the
Anderson Room by adding to the
side and back of the Union build-
ing.
Snack Bar
A tap room and snack bar are
also intended for the/ additional
space in the basement. Improve-
ment and expansion of plumbing
and electrical facilities in the Un-

ion's sub-basement are planned.
In the spring and summer the
old Journalism Bldg., which later
housed Student Legislature, was
torn down to maze room for the
two-floor addition between the ex-
isting Union Bldg. and the Admin-
istration Bldg.
The addition is planned so that
it will be possible to expand to the
front of the addition if it is neces-
sary in the future, and the second
floor corridor will also allow for
possible future expansion.
Voter Registration
Open to Residents
Unregistered Ann Arbor citizens
who wish to vote in national, state
and local elections Nov. 2 may
register from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mon-
day through Friday and from 8
a.m. to noon Saturday through
Oct. 2 in the City Clerk's office,
City Hall.

Union Addition Contract Awarded Soon l

Well Starts
Taking Wate
A suposedly rich oil well on the
Charles Nerreter farm north of
Seven Mile began proving disap-
pointing to owners last week when
she well started taking in large
amounts of water.
Plans yere laid immediately to
install pumps in the well, which
had been flowing moderately until
Friday.
Meanwhile pumping will begin
as soon as equipment can be set
up on two other oil sites struck
near the Nerreter farm ,
Conservation Director G. E. Ed-
dy ruled last week that not more
than one oil well may be drilled
in every 40 acres in Freedom
Township in the Ann Arbor area.
Eddy also made pernanent an
emergency order invoked several
weeks ago which restricted wells
in the Salem township area to 200
barrels per day.

II

SL EXCHANGE STUDENTS, BERND RISSMAN (LEFT) AND
BILL ALLEN DISCUSS THEIR YEAR ABROAD WITH
FULBRIGHT STUDENT KARL ROSKAMP.

elcomne

to GRE

E'S

ing of the motor which he did
himself.
The car enabled him to see
much of the country during the
summer. America, he found, is not
"all cowboys and gangsters, jazz,
Coca Cola, and business.
"I found people here having the
same interests and needs as in
O' Pranv 1 hPCa" r

In another adventure, Allen ac-
cidentally found his way into a
May Day parade in East Berlin,
and was forced to march to its
conclusion.
Most important, said Allen of
his year in Europe, was clearing
up his mistaken impressions of
the Europeans.
R ' hsdis a nlae nof

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said he haddreamed of all my G ermany, ┬▒ne saia .. .m'" s 1*.., , ...y: a pl
life." Allen had many of his own realism. It is an isolated area
"Other students wondered why, experiences to tell. His expenses fighting a battle without a future
I didn't read my books more," he in Berlin were "very adequately" -just to exist. The West Berliners
said. "But I wanted to know all paid by the Free University of are the most courageous and fear-
the little things that you don't Berlin. He stayed at first at the less people in the world, but there
find here in the classroom. dis International Student House, a is a definite spiritual need there."
the little things which form the dormitory exclusively for exchange In Berlin Allen met Karl Ros-
,, students. kamp, a Fulbright student coming
eld Local Jobs With a minimum of German to Michigan this year to study ec-
telanguage training, it was firstI onomics. The two are now campus
Rissman saw Ann Arbor, the difficult for him to integrate, but room-mates.
University, and the country from he managed it quickly. Both Riss- Praise SL Program
the many viewpoints he wanted. man and he speak each others' Allen and Rissman parted com-
He worked as a carwasher, a languages fluently now. pany Saturday promising each
hiousekeeper, a construction work- Motorcycle Adventure other to give all their support at
er in Detroit, and a soil engineer. MtAccl hintr
With the money he earned he Ahstory major, Allan studied their respective campuses to pro-!
bought himself a '46 Plymouth modern German history, language moting further exchange programs
coue. He admits he was "taken" and writing in Berlin. He bought between the two nations. They
inhsae.dmiT.heacstak250, himself a motorcycle to travel praised the SL program, and ex-
but neededea complete overhaul-around southern Europe. However pressed hopes for its continuance
during a three-month spring vaca- and expansion.
tion, Allen ran his motorcycle into In Germany, "meanwhile, Lois
a stone wall while traveling in Dieche, Grad, is beginning study
F~iL'RL1 A 1k1~1i southern France. He suffered a at the Free University of Berlin,
0minor concussion but so mangled while next week, Heinz Koehler
]g ures lIISe his right arm that he can now will arrive in Ann Arbor to be-
only swing it about six inches from come the second German student
Unemployment continued at an the elbow. here under the SL program.
unusual high during the summer,
and national figures showed 3,245,- Jjln rP aie i nt to
th ed fth smer. lnger Praises Orientation
000 workers still out of jobs at:;
Figures printed in an official Planning for ForeLn Students
CIO publication recently showed -___
that the number of unemployed New foreign students are being
remained steady throughout the oriented to the campus and Univer- fall the foreign students were met
summer. Usually seasonal slacks in a program which has re- at the depot in Ann Arbor, and in-
are reduced and employment fig- ceived enthusiastic praise from As- dividually introduced to the cam-
ures go up by early August, the sistant Counselor to Foreign Stu- pus by a local student. Aid and ad-
report showed. dents, Robert B. Klinger. vice were given for registration,
Michigan totals of unemployed The orientation program is being finding roons and any other prob-
persons continued to climb toward jointly handled by the Student Leg- lems the student may have had.
the end of the summer, with 250,- islature's International Commit- SL International Committee head,
000 the most recent total announc- tee and the International Students Donna Netzer, '56, said plans are
ed by state officials. Association. now under way to integrate the
In Macomb county, in central "I don't see how it could be bet- new students into activities cover-
Michigan, families hard hit by ter," Klinger said. "The students ing their fields of interest. Frater-
temporary unemployment last are being helped to find rooms, to nities and sororities have to be
week bekan receiving food from register for the right courses, and contacted so that the foreign stu-
the Government. Surplus foods to integrate themselves with other dent. may be able to eat at the
were made available to these fam- students on the campus." housn and meet more American
ilies. The program was begun last students.
spring when 250 University stu- Heading the ISA orientation
1 U S edents wrote personal letters to the! group are Rasheed Muriby and
133 U' Students incominginternational group. This Richard Fu.
Earn All-A Record

In finnfirbor Greene's. is
Your Hometown Cleaner
Withfill Conveniences
fAnd Services.
WATCH FANUOR THE SIGN OF THE MICROSCOPE,

.
I
k
k k'
k
.
4

i

In Ann Arbor it's
MICR LEAN
(Ask YOUR home town cleaner.)

One hundred thirty-three stu-
dents carring a minimum of six
hours made an all-A record dur-
ing the Summer Session, the Uni-
versity has announced.
Forty-four of the students were
in the literary college, 41 in the
School of Music, 23 in education
school, 18 in nursing school, five
in the Schol of Natural Resources
and one each in architecture and
design and in the School of Pub-
lic Health.

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HOBBY SHOP

1954 FOOTBALL SCHEDULE

Model Airplanes
Model Trains
Balsa Wood

Model Boats
Old Time Cars
Crafts & Materials

115 W. Liberty St. (1/2 Block West of Main St.)

Sept. 25-U. of Washington at Seattle
Oct. 2-ARMY...... ...... .HOME,
Oct. 9-IOWA ............. HOME
Oct. 16-Northwestern.. at Evanston
Oct. 23-MINNESOTA ...... .HOME

Oct. 30-INDIANA ......... HOME

Nov. 6-ILLINOIS...,
Nov. 13-MSC.......

. . . . . . . H OME
.......HOME

Nov. 20-Ohio State. . . .at Columbus

4

ARE YOU A FRUSTRATED ACTOR?
The U of M
STUDENT PLAYERS
is the only extra-curricular theatre group on
campus to present both Broadway plays and

Shirt Laundry

GRcE ENE
N UNDER THE MICROSCOI

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11

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