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November 30, 1954 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-11-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1

P'AGE SMN

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY. MAY 4. 1091

JI'yr oLAV pMIA L 1o Il

I

'U' CYCLISTS VERSUS PEDESTRIANS:
Bicycle Population Gradually Increasing

GE Trustees Announce
New University Aid Plan

By BETTY SCHOMER
More than 150 bicycles are park-*
ed in front of Mason Hall at mid
morning.
Most of these are neatly filed in
the provided racks. H;Iowever,
some have to make use of any
available space. Mason Hall isn't
the only location for such a con-
centration of bicycles. Just as
many can be found at many other
places on campus.
Menace and Skill
Judging from this approximate
number, a pedestrian might sus-
pect that these two-wheeled ve-
hicles are a menace .to life and
limb, but some 'U' bicycle riders
are really quite skillful. Competi-
tion with the heavy Ann Arbor and
campus traffic has made the aver-
age cyclist an expert at calculated
risks.
Cycling has definite advantages.
Preferred by most students, is the
English bike with adjustable
three -speed control, quick-stop-
ping brakes and finger-tip steer-
ing enables even the latest sleeper
to get to his 8 o'clock on time. Eco-
nomically, cycling cuts shoe-repair
to a minimum. Upkeep and repair
are practically non-existant. The
primary expenditure is the pur-
chase of the bicycle itself.
The Extras
Standard equipment on the ma-
jority of bicycles includes head
and tail lights for night driving,
baskets for books and a lock. Ber-
muda bells, horns, seat covers,
speedometers and other additional
gadgets are also seen.
The maize and blue license
plates, required by the city, are
not seen on many bicycles. The
license bureau does not have a
compiled list of the number of 'U'
bicycles with and without the tags.
Observation approximates illegal
bikes outnumber legal ones.
New racks have been installed
at the front of Mason Hall. Even
this additional. space at times, is
insufficient for the rising number
of bicycles.

-Daily-Dick GaskiiL
STUDENT OUTNUMBERED BY BICYCLES
NITA AHo lds Fall Conclave;
Ruthven To .deliver Main Talk

Trustees of the General Electric
Educational and Charitable Fund
recently announced a new plan to
provide financial assistance for
American colleges and universities.
The new plan, known as the
Corporate Alumnus Program, will
become effective January 1 and
will make gifts from the fund in
amounts equal to those made by
GE employed alumni during 1955.
Phillip D. Reed, chairman of
the GE board of directors and
EVENTS TODAY
PHILIP N. YOUST, New York
architect, will speak on "The Im-
pact of Science on Architecture"
at 4:15 p.m. today in the Architec-
ture Auditorium.
* * 9
REPRESENTATIVES from 11
colleges and universities through-
out the country are attending a
pre-law conference ending today.
The purpose, according to Prof.
William B. Harvey of the Law
School, is to provide information
to undergraduate advisors attend-
ing the conference which will en-
able them to counsel their own
students more effectively and to
assist the Law School in the for-
mulation of a continuing program
that will be of more benefit to
undergraduate students.
"GERMANY - Partner of the
Free World" will be discussed by
Heinz L. Krekeler, Ambassador to
the United States from Germany
at 4:15 p.m. in the Rackham Am-
phitheater.
Lithograph Exhibit
Prof. Emil Weddige of the Col-
lge of Architecture and Design
will have a one-man exhibit of
color lithographs on view begin-
ning today at the Forsythe Gallery.
The Gallery is located at 1101
Martin Place, with hours from 10
a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesdays and
Thursdays through Dec. 16. It will
be open today from 8 to 10 p.m.

chairman of the Fund's trustees,
stated that the new program is
"frankly an experiment, arrived at
after long consideration of the
whole subject of business support
for higher education"
Reed estimated that the com-
pany employs about 23,000 college
graduates with degrees from more
than 540 U.S.colleges and univer-
sities. He said that contributions
to any such graduate, up to $1,000
within the year, will be eligible
from the Fund.
Plan's Stipulations
The plan further stipulates that
that contributing employees must
have at least a year's service with
the company; the contributions
must be an actual gift, not a
pledge; and it must be made to an
accredited United States college
or University of which the contri-
butor is an earned degree holder.
Reed explained that the trustees
of the Educational and Charitable
Fund are strongly convinced that
regular contributions from alumni
are one of the greatest untapped
sources of continuing support for
higher education. They felt that a
joint "corporate alumnus" program
with provisions for joint action
would do most to stimulate col-
leges to develop their own alumni
programs.
"It is clear that the one who
profits most from education is the
individual graduate, but undeni-
ably the benefits are shared by
the organizations with which he
is associated," Reed said.
Tuition Coverage
He explained, however, that "in
almost every instance, the real
cost of a college education was not
covered by tuition-usually not
more than half of it, in fact." He
felt therefore that both the indi-
vidual and his organization should
undertake some responsibility for
support of the colleges and uni-
versities.
Reed stated "this proposition is
especially challenging right now,
when institutions of higher edu-
cation are facing higher costs, in-
creased enrollments, and greater
demands for educated manpower
on the part of industry, science,
the professions and government."

College
Round-up
A parking permit battle has been
won by students at the University
of California.
One hundred University owned
parking spaces have been allocated
to students commuting to the Ber-
keley campus. Spaces are distri-
buted to students on the basis of
the number of students carried in
one car and the distance travelled.
"Talking through one's ears has
become a reality."
Experiments on man's ability to
produce sounds through the hu-
man ear are being conducted at
Ohio State.
Sounds are transmitted into a
"sound-baffle box" which fits
closely over the speaker's mouth
and nose; stethoscopes with glass
and rubber tubing connect the
speaker and listener.
Ear to ear talking can prove
useful to the Air Force. Pilots may
have use of both hands. It can
"reduce noise interference from
engines and human breath and
solve the technical problems of
placing microphones in oxygen
masks."
Pool Contests
Start at Union.
Prof. Harry Carver of the math-
ematics department is taking on
all comers in the Union sponsored
billiards tournaments which start-
ed yesterday.
The three tournaments will last
two more weeks. The first contest,
now in progress, is pocket pool--
75 points; the second, straight rail
up to 75 points; and the third,
three cushion billiards up to 25
points.
The three highest scoring stu-
dents in each contest will receive
prizes presented by the Union.
First prize will be a cue and second
and third are airplane rides with
Prof. Carver.
All students interested in the
tournament are welcome to sign
up in the Union poolroom as par-
ticipants or to go there at 3 and
7 p.m. towatch the games.

By PHYLLIS LIPSKY
Politics, professional singing and
a family which includes two chil-
dren occupy most of Burnette
Staebler's time.
Through an interest in children's
theater, however, she became ac-
tive in the Dramatic Arts Center

Active participation in politics
began after her marriage to Neil
Staebler,, a native Ann Arborite
who is Chairman of the Democra.
tic State Central Committee.
'Lady Democrat'
Her own political activities have
included everything from organiz-
ing coffee hour discussion groups
around the state to playing the
role of the Lady Democrat in a
play called "The Republicans Went
Thataway."
A member of the City Can-
didates Committee, Mrs. Staebler
said she feels getting good candi-
dates is one of the most important
reasons for participation in poli-
tics. "Even if they don't win," she
said, "competition forces the oth-
er party's candidates to take op-
posing viewpoints into considera-
tion."
Political activities have not en-
tirely overshadowed Mrs. Staeb-
ler's singing career though. As the
mezzo soprano in a- quartet she
can be heard on Sunday mornings
on a'program called "Hymns of
Faith" over WUOM and WJR.
From 1949 to 1951 she had her
own weekly radio program "Songs
Around the World" which featur-
ed folk songs and lighter classics.
Board Director
As a member of both the Dra-
matic Arts Center's Board of Di-
rectors and the cast of its present
production Mrs. Staebler says she
thinks the idea is "catching fire."
There is a huge interest in the
non theatrical aspects of the Cen-
ter's program, such as children's
classes, she said, which she feels
can make a valuable contribution
to the community.

Politics, Family, Singing--
Fill Time of DAC Actress

J

BURNETTE STAEBLER

National Institutional Teacher
Placement Association will hold
its 21st annual fall conference
here today through Friday.
Twenty-two Michigan educa-
tional institutions will serve as
hosts for the approximately 125
people who are expected to at-
tend. The conference will include
sessions at Michigan State College
and a tour of Michigan State
Normal College campus.
Former University president
Alexander G. Ruthven will ad-
dress the conference on "Michi-
gan" at 8:15 p.m. tomorrow, dur-
ing the second general session.

Lloyd D. Bernard, University of
California at Berkeley, will preside.
James A. Hays of Michigan State
College, will speak there at 5:30
p.m. Thursday on "Cows and Their
Importance to Mankind," at the
Kellogg Center.
Frank S. Endicot of Northwest-
ern University will head the reso-
lutions committee meeting Thurs-
day and make the committee re-
port Friday morning. Wayne S.
Schomer of Indiana State Teach-
ers College, NITPA vice-president,
will serve as chairman of the com-
mittee on membership and exter-
sion.
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

and the busy Ann Arborite is cur-
rently spending four evenings a
week as an actress.
Mrs. Staebler, who plays Aunt
Columba in "The Moon in the
Yellow River" by Denis Johnston,
got her first acting experience as
a University graduate student in
a speech department play produc-
tion. A singing major, she had
the feminine leads in "The Vaga-
bond King," "The Bartered Bride"
and "Abduction from the Sepag-
lio."

BULLETIN!
Follett's Christmas Cards
are now on open display.
Panda, Oz, Manville & Christan Elliott etc.
from 5c and up
'A
Be sure to stop in this week while the selection is complete.

Q
COLLIER'S 65TH
ALL-AMERICA I
Who made it? Which section placed the most men?
Who is the player of the year?
You'll get the answers when you get the new issue of
Collier's and meet the finest of all the All-Americas
- selected by the American Football Coaches
Association
Don't miss this authoritative last word on a great
gridiron season, in
Colliers
DEC. 10 ISSUE ON NEWSSTANDS Now

r 'I

Originator of 25c meal
now located at 112 E. Huron
Our Burgers are the
Biggest.. Juiciest .. Best
in Ann Arbor - Try one and if you don't agree
DON'T PAY FOR IT!
Verionc, cze
CHRISTMAS CARDS
RUST CRAFT
CURRIER &-IVES ENGLISH DESIGNS
MICHIGAN SEAL
CHRISTMAS WRAPPINGS
Since MORRILL'S Phone
1908 314 S. State St. NO

JEWELHV - CERAMICS - TRICKS
GREETING CARDS - MINIATURES - TOYS
~ Yanflyke's
215 East Liberty
NO 3-1319
OPEN MONDAY AND FRIDAY EVENINGS

I

I

PERSONAL CARD ALBUMS ALSO ON DISPLAY

1

For the Sharpest Cards in Town Buy at
FOLLETT'S
State Street at North University

I

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WHAT'S THIS DROODLE?.
For solution see paragraph below.

- ow"

A.

MWEnNW
C3JC3 C

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V:I

LADY SCRUTINIZING SELF
IN MIRROR AFTER USING
VANISHING CREAM
Lili Whitfield
University of North Carolina
TREE BEING FELLED
BY MIDGET AND TALL FRIEND
Donald 0. Kistner
Texas Tech
t IA
STRIKE
C i Li ther -

SWISS CHEESE MADE
BY I.B.M. MACHINE
Mort Fink
Brooklyn College

GIRL WITH PONY TAIL
RIDING PONY
William H. Harris
Washington State College

Ili

IN d
PIURINTING
KING SIZE SERVICE
u'" Card to a Catalog by
(s Push Button
LOWER PRICES
n o

ACCORDING TO THE LARGEST and latest coast-to-coast
college survey, college smokers prefer Luckies-and
by a wide margin. The No. 1 reason: Luckies taste
better. Thousands of students appreciate Luckies'
better taste almost as much as the pair in the Droodle
above, titled: Sweethearts attempting to kiss and
enjoy better-tasting Luckies at same time. Luckies
taste better for good reasons. First of all, Lucky
Strike means fine tobacco. Then, "It's Toasted" to
taste better. This famous Lucky Strike process tones
up Luckies' light, good-tasting tobacco to make it
taste even better-cleaner, fresher, smoother. So,
enjoy the ,better-tasting cigarette ... Lucky Strike.

MELTED SNOWMAN

Wilim . ice
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