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November 30, 1954 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-11-30

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, MAY $, 1955

PAGE TWO THE MWHfl~A1V BATTY TUESDAY. MAY ~. 1955

av+u. r, a+aa.at arwaas v v

Thuma Staffn
Studies LSA
Space Limit
Shortage of office and classroom
space because of increased enroll-
ment and staff is now being stud-
ied, according to Dean Burton
Thuma, assistant dean of the lit-
erary college.
He indicated, however, that the
Committee on Class Study and
Room Assignment has not yet
contemplated any compulsory Sat-
urday classes.
The committee has been com-
piling statistics on how many
classrooms are now in use, how
each department makes use of its
space, and what hours are most
popular. It has found that all
available space is taken Monday,
Wednesday, and Friday at 9 a.m.
A -five-year building program
has been presented to the State
Legislature to alleviate crowded
conditions. If it is passed, build-
ings would probably be built to
replace such structures as the
Temporary Classroom Building,
the quonset huts, the Romance
Language Building. Replacement
wouldn't allow much additional
space, Dean Thuma explained.
He said he believes there is a
need for more afternoon classes.
Science laboratories would be given
in the morning to allow students
to take afternoon classes.

PROFICIENCY:
Students Face Changed
Language Requirement

(Continued from Page 1)
"The University has no language
requirement for entrance, but
rather one for exit," Prof. James
C. O'Neill of the French depart-
ment said. "It has been in the
rear guard of first rate institu-
tions as far as languages are con-
cerned. We have settled for so
little for so long."
Reactions in other University
departments coincide with Prof.
O'Neill's attitude. Prof. Leo Gold-
berg of the astronomy department
said he believes that "foreign lan-
guages are extremely important in
astronomy to carry on research.
Textbooks are published in French,
German, and Russian."
"People are not really educated
unless they are acquainted with a
foreign language," Prof. T. H.
Hildebrandt of the mathematics
department said. "This new pro-
ficiency requirement should en-
able students to speak and read a
language other than English."
'Humanistic Discipline'
"Fuller language training is not
only practical, but also a human-
istic discipline," according to Prof.
Marvin Eisenberg of the fine arts
department. "Knowledge of lan-
guage is a basis to understanding
the history of art. Since art does
cross so many borders, language

training and international contact
will enable a student to a better
appreciation of art."
"The major value of language
proficiency is that it is one of the
best ways to begin to understand
the culture and literature of for-
eign people," Prof. Roger Heyns
of the psychology department said.
"I don't think the primary value
lies in the ability to talk abroad-
such as hailing a Spanish taxicab."
Prof. Clark Hopkins of the clas-
sical studies department said he
believes emphatically that "every
University student should have at
least a partial training in a lan-
guage to help him become more
intimately acquainted with the
world."
Prof. Albert Marckwardt of the
English department said the new
requirement removes "inequities
under the old system and will re-
sult in a greater amount of lan-
guage competence. Language is a
tool which bridges one culture to
another."
Christmas CARE

Collections

Taken

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w

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Just think of a name for the
biggest-juiciest-best hamburger
in Ann Arbor made by
K AZyJjM
ORIGINATOR OF DOUBLE SIZE HAMBURGERS
NOW LOCATED AT
112 E. HURON ST.

Collections for CARE's Christ-
mas "Food Crusade" are now be-
ing taken at the Railway Express
Agency, Ann Arbor, agent James
D. Tucker said yesterday.
According to Tucker, a $1 do-
nation assures delivery of two food
packages weighing 28 pounds to
needy families in 31 countries of
Europe, Asia and Latin America.

'U' Students
Face Triple
Poll Problem
University students will be faced
with three responsibilities Decem-
ber 8 and 9 when they vote from
8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at 15 ballot boxes
placed conveniently around cam-
pus.
First, they must choose out of
34 candidates 25 students to lead
the present student governing
body, the Student Legislature.
Secondly, they must answer a
student poll which asks, in es-
sence, "Do you approve of the
Student Government Council as
the official body of representatives
for the students of the University
of Michigan?"
J-Hop Referendum
The third ballot is a J-Hop ref-
erendum in two parts. The first
section asks "Would you prefer to
have the 'J-Hop committee elected
or appointed?" The second asks
the student body to pick the make-
up of the appointing board which
it would have pick the J-Hop com-
mittee.
The following students will ap-
pear on the ballot for SL seats:
Ronald Boorstein, 57; Edward
Boseker, '58; Joan Bryan, '56;
Charnie Butman, '56; Bob Chi-
grinsky, '55; Shirlee Clark, '56Ed;
Joe Collins, '56; Margie Conn, '57;
Cal Covell, '58E; Paul Dormont
'55; Harlan Givelber '57; Bill
Haney, '58; Bob Kaplan; John
Kelly, '55; Shirley Lawson, '57;
Bob Leacock, '57; Sue Levy, '56;
Robert Liss, '58; George Litwin,
'58; Paul Mundinger, '56; Janet
Neary, '58; James K. Perkins, '58;
Nick Redfield; Ronald Richard-
son; Jean Schlusberg, '58; Ronald
Shorr, '58; Si Silver, '58; Bob
Sommer, '57E; Sally Staples, '57;
Mary Starman, '58; Tony Trittipo,
'58; Brenda Wehbring, '56; Car-
roll Williams; and Sandy Wolf, '58.
Responsible Vote Asked
Elections director, Dave Levy,
'57, explains: "In order to make
the tremendous number of man-
hours and sizeable sum of money
that elections involve worthwhile,
we must have an intelligent and
responsible campus vote.
"In voting on the SGC poll stu-
dents should carefully consider the
differences between SL and SGC.
Highway Study
"Michigan State Highway Ex-
penditure Policy" is analyzed in a
booklet published here, written by
Prof. Hubert H. Frisinger of the
University of Toledo.
Written while Prof. Frisinger
was studying for his doctor of
philosophy degree here, the study
discusses the history and back-
ground of the present highway
problem.
Also included in the booklet are
some basic principles of highway
expenditure planning and financ-
ing.
FAR CROV P TAel N LUXURY
CNA rR A CREYHOUND
GO TOGETHER
To: Sports Events - Parties!
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DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the University
of Michigan for which the Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial responsi-
bility. Publication in it is construc-
tive notice to all members of the
University. Notices should be sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 3553
Administration Building before 2 p.m.
the day preceding publication (be-
fore 10 a.m. on Saturday). Notice of
lectures, concerts, and organization
meetings cannot be published oftener
than twice.
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 1954
Vol. LXV, No. 57
Notices
Air Force ROTC: Notice is hereby
given that the Air Force Officer Quali-
fying Tests for AFROTC cadets will
be given in Kellogg Auditorium from
1:00-5:00 p.m., Fri., Dec. 3 and from 8
ami.-12:00M Sat., Dec. 4. Attendance
of all concerned at both sessions is
required.
University Senate will meet Mon., Dec.
13 at 4:15 p.m. In Auditorium A, Angell
Ha L.
Veterans eligible for education and
training allowance under Public Law
550 (Korea .I. Bill) must get instruc-
tors' signatures for Nov. on Dean's
Monthly Certification and return that
certification to the Dean's office on or
before Dec. 2.
TIAA - College Retirement Equities
Fund. Participants in the Teachers In-
surance and Annuity Association re-
tirement program who wish to change
their contributions to the College Re-
tirement Equities Fund, or to apply for
or discontinue participation in the
Equities Fund, will be able to make
such changes before Dec. 15. Staff
members who have 1'a or % of the con-
tributions to TIAA allocated to CREF
may wish to change to a % basis, or
go from the latter to a 1 or 1 basis.
PERSONNEL INTERVIEWS:
Representatives from the following
will interview at Engineering:
Wed. & Thurs., Dec. 1 & 2
The Trane Co., LaCrosse, Wis.-B.S.
& M.S. in Aero., Civil, Elect., Chem. E,
Engrg. Mech., and all degrees in Mech.
for Sales Management, Sales Engrg.,
Research, 'Product Design & Develop-
ment, Ind. Engrg.'
University of Mich., Engrg. Research
Institute, Willow Run Research Center,
Ypsilanti, Mich.-All degrees in Elect.
E., Engrg. Math and Physics for Re-
search and Devel. Security clearance
required.
Thurs., Dec. 2
Bethlehem Steel Corp., Bethlehem,
Penn.-Al degrees of all Engrg. except
Aero. for Production, Research, Sales.
Fri., Dec. 3
American Blower Corp., Detroit, Mich.
-All levels of Mech., Elect., and Ind.
E. for Engrg., Manufacturing, and
Sales.
The Dayton Power & Light Co., Day-
ton, Ohio-B.S. in Civil, Elect., & Mech.
E. for Engrg. Training Program.
National Lead Co., Reactor Fuel Plant,
Cincinnati, Ohio-All levels of Mech. E.
Plant and Process Development of Ex-
traction, Reduction, & Fabrication Pro-
cesses for Uranium and Thorium Metal
Products.
Thurs. & Fri., Dec. 2 & 3
Remington Rand, Inc., Engineering
Research Assoc., St. Paul, Minn.-Al
levels of Elect., Mech. E., Engrg. Math.
and Engrg. Physics for Research and
Devel. at St. Paul laboratories and
Field Engineering anywhere in the
continental U.S.
Part-time Work
Interview Tues., Nov. 30 for students
with high scholastic average for part-
time work at the University of Michi-
gan Engineering Research Institute at
the Willow Run Research Center.
Students interested in any of the
above, should contact the Engineering
Placement Office, 248 W. Engrg., Ext.
2 (Continued on Page 4)

LINES
2
3
4

Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
11:00. A.M. Saturday
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Lady Elgin yellow gold wrist
watch with expansion band last Sat-
urday, November 13. Lost between
Pen Club Special Train and Section
44 of Stadium. Sentimental value.
Reward. H. H. Coll, 1535 Pontiac Road,
SE., Grand Rapids. )44A
LIGHT BLUE AND SILVER Shaeffer
pen. Lost Wednesday in Auditorium
A. Reward. Call 4054 Stockwell. )48A
LOST-Thermo Dynamics by Dodge in
Room 1042 E. Engineering about
three weeks ago. 200 Strauss. NO
2-4591. )47A
FOR SALE
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords-$6.88. Sox,
39c; shorts 69c; military supplies.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington. )26B
1947 PLYMOUTH four door sedan, radio
and heater. The big lot across from
the downtown carport. Huron Motor
Sales. 222 W. Washington. NO 2-4588.
)104B
THREE CHOICES-1951 Chevrolets. Ra-
dios, heaters, power glide. All four
doors. The big car lot scross from
downtown carport. Huron Motor
Sales. 222 W. Washington. NO 2-4588.
)135B
FOR SALE-78 RPM Record Collection,
Popular and Jazz, also Walnut Egy
parlor organ, excellent condition $60.
Call NO 2-8262 after 6 p.m. )146B
1950 CHEVROLET two door, radio and
heater. Low mileage, one owner, very
nice. The big lot across frorh the
downtown carport. Huron Motor
Sales, 222 W. Washington. NO 2-4588.
)151B
1950 MERCURY CLUB COUPE, radio
heater and overdrive. Dark green
finish, beautiful condition. The big
lot across from the downtown car-
port. Huron Motor Sales, 222 W.
Washington. NO 2-4588. )150B
1952 NASH RAMBLER station wagon.
Radio and heater, low mileage and
very sharp. The big lot across from
the downtown carport. Huron Motor
Sales. 222 W. Washington. NO 2-4588.
)149B
1947 PLYMOUTH SEDAN, good con-
dition, $150. 1938 Plymouth Sedan,
good transportation, $60. Fitzgerald-
Jordan, NO 8-8141. )155B

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone NO 23-24-1
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES

1 DAY
.66
.77.
.99

ya

3 DAYS
1.47
1.95
2.46

6 DAYS
2.15
3.23
4.31

FOR SALE
STANDARD Underwood Typewriter.
Good Condition $30.00. Call NO
2-7937. )152B
BABY BASSINET, good condition, call
Miss Barber, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. NO 3-1511,
Ext. 586. )148B
1950 FORD, 2 door, 6 cylinder, general
condition excellent. Will take best
offer. Days call Jean Schuler, NO
2-4493. Nights call NO 3-2572. )154B
REMINGTON noiseless typewriter, like
new. Call NO 3-0398. )153B
FOR RENT
TWO-ROOM furnished apartment, all
utilities, except gas. No .children,
share bath. Call NO 8-8900, 903 Mary
Street. )15C
PERSONAL
SPECIAL RATES for students and for
Christmas on many mags. Student
Periodical. NO 2-3061. )38F
MAGS-make MAGnificent inexpensive
year round Xmas gifts. We have a
selection of over 3,000; $2 up. Special
student, faculty, staff, holiday rates.
Call our personal shopper. Student
Periodical, NO 2-3061; days, eves. )39F
HELP WANTED
PART TIME service station attendant.
Hickey's Servxice Station, Main)at
Catherine. )21H
WANTED TO BUY
WOOD CLARINET. Call Miss Barber,
8 a.m.-5 p.m. NO 3-1511, Ext. 586. )4J
BUSINESS SERVICES
WASHING-Finished work and hand
ironing. Rough dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone NO 2-9020 Wool
soxs washed also. 181

BUSINESS SERVICES
R. A. MADDY-VIOLIN MAKER. Fine
instruments, Accessories, Repairs. 310
S. State, upstairs. Phone NO 2-5962.
)101
RAD IO-PHONO-TV
Service and Sales
Free Pick-Up and Delivery
Fast Service -- Reasonable Rates
"Student Service"
ANN ARBOR RADIO AND TV
1217 S. University, Phone NO 8-7942
1 blocks east of East Eng. )481
TYPING WANTED, reasonable rates.
Mrs. Mullet, 726 S. Main St., NO
8-6883. )131
REAL ESTATE
CALL WARD REALITY
NO 2-7787
for 2x3 bedroom homes-priced for
students. Evenings call:
Mr. Hadcock NO 2-5863
Mr. Rice 3YP 2740-M
Mr. Garner NO 3-2761
Mr. Martin NO 8-8608
Mr. Schoot NO 3-2763 )20

*FIE".

JANUARY 3-31

RENT-A-CAR

f

'

I

LICENSE
Nye

Standard Rates
Include:
Gas and ail
and Insurance.
Phone
NO 3-4156
NO 8-9757
Motor Sales
Inc.'

MrCIITGAN

A Few Reprints of the Fall
STU DENT
DIRECTORY
are available at
Student Publications Building

o- IACJ LL.~

STRINGED
INSTRUMENTS
Repair-
Reconditioning
Accessories
STRING SHOP
211 South State
Phone NO 3-3874

TI

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added
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* Eves. 75c

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offered by Kyer Model Laundry and Cleaners
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2. Shirts starched, or not, as you prefer.

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