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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 20, 1954 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-11-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

'*PAGL rom

TWUMLE MICMGAN BAUM

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 20,1951

~AG1~ FOUR THE MICHIGAN DAIIN SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 20,1954

Baritone Leonard Warren
To Sing at-Hill Tomorrow

Concluding last season's perform-
ances, Metropolitan Opera bari-
tone Leonard Warren boasted 400
appearances at the Met'in 22 roles,
Appearing here at 8:30 p.m. to-
morrow in Hill Auditorium, Warren
will sing a group of classical, ro-
mantic and modern songs. Among
them will be "Aria di Floridante,"
by Handel; "Les Berceaux," by
Faure and "Largo el factotum,"
by Rossini.
Born in New York City, Warren
reached the Met through the Met's
Auditions of the Air. After six
months' study in Italy, he made
his debut in 1939.
He appeared at the Met's open-
ing night two weeks ago, singing
the Prologue from Leoncovallo's
"Pagliacci." In September, War-
ren appeared with the San Fran-
cisco Opera, singing "La Forza
del Destino" and "Rigoletto."
It was as Rigoletto that he made
his debut at Milan's La Scala last.
season, the first non-Italian to un-
dertake the role there.
Warren has also sung for six
consecutive seasons in Buenos
Aires' Teatro Colon and in the Te-j
atro Municipal in Rio de Janeiro.
Last August, Warren sang the
world-premiere of "The Lamenta-
tion of Saul" by Norman Dello
Joio.
Known for performances in
"Otello," Aida," "Pagliacci'" and
"Rigoletto" Warren adds a new
role this season as he appears in
a new version of "Andrea Che-
nier."
Tickets priced at $3, $2.50, $2 and
$1.50 are on sale at the University
Musical Society offices in Burton
Tower and after 7 p.m. tomorrow
at Hill Auditorium box office.
County Keeps'
Election Plan
For Coroners
Although several counties in
Michigan appoint medical examin-
ers, Washtenaw County elects cor-
oners.
Medical examiners present a.
more expensive proposition for a
county to begin, since they must
be physicians operating on a full-
time basis. This means that small-
er counties such as Washtenaw can
provide coroners cheaper, as they
.operate on a fee basis.
According to Dr. Edwin C. Ganz-
horn, county coroner for the past
34 years, about a year ago the Leg-
islature passed legislation permit-
ting county boards of supervisors
to appoint medical examiners and
discontinue the elected position.
Although Dr. Ganzhorn declared
himself neutral on the question of
whether coroners should be elect-
ed or appointed, he said that one
year ago the Washtenaw County
Medical Society came out in favor
of the medical examiner system.
At the same time, they endorsed
Dr. Ganzhorn for the post, he said.
Vast majority of coroners in
Michigan are physicians, he con-
tinued. Where the coroner system
predominates, however, many non-
physicians hold office.
Recently-elected coroner Frank
W. Staffan, an undertaker, said, if
approved here the medical exam-
iner system would require an ex-
penditure of probably four or five
times what is presently paid the
two coroners in fees.
According to county clerk Lu-
ella M. Smith, $1,895 was spent
last year for fees to coroners.
Standard fee is approximately five
dollars per case.

At Toledo
Zino Francescatti, famous vi-
olinist, will perform Monday
night in the Toledo Museum of
Art.
Born in France in 1905, Fran-
cescatti made his first public
appearance at the age of five.
He made his United States de-
but in 1939 with the New York
Philharmonic Orchestra, and
appeared in Toledo's art muse-
um two months later. Monday's
appearance will be his second
there.
Tickets for the concert are
available at the Museum ticket
office.

ADAMS COLLECTION:
'U' Library To Get Microfilm Papers

College Roundup

The University Library has been
named one of 16 major research
libraries in the United States to re-
ceive the microfilm reproduction
of the famous Adams family pa-
pers, Frederick H. Wagman, li-
brary director, announced yester-
day.
When the microfilming of the pa-
pers is completed, the library will
possess, according to Dr. Wagman,
over 300,000 manuscript pages, two
thirds of them unpublished, consti-
tuting the public and private rec-
ord of a family whose history is

Lane Hall Provides Campus
Center for ReligiousActivities

in many respects almost the equiv-
alent of the history of the Ameri-
can people from pre-Revolutionary
times to the twentieth century.
Represented in this veritable
Who's Who, family size, are John
Adams (1735-1826), second presi-
dent of the United States; his wife.
Abigail Adams (1744-1818), one of
the most prolific letterwriters. of
her time; their son, John. Quincy
Adams (1767-1848), sixth president;
his son, Charles Francis Adams
(1807-1886), Lincoln's ambassador
to England; and finally, the four
distinguished sons of Charles Fran-
cis Adams; John Quincy Adams
2d (1833-1894), leader of the Demo-
cratic Party and five times unsuc-
cessful candidate for the governor-
ship of Massachusetts; Charles
Francis Adams 2d (1835-1915),
president of the Union Pacific Rail-
road; Henry Adams (1838-1918),
journalist, historian, and author of
"The Education of Henry Adams";
and Brooks Adams (1848-1927), his-
torian and philosopher.
Now Controlled by Trust
The Adams family archives are
now under the control of the Ad-
ams Family Trust, of Boston,
which was established by the fami-
ly in 1905, the trust to run for 50
years.
By terms of the trust the family
papers could be transferred only
to the government of the United

States, the Commonwealth of Mas-
sachusetts, a municipality or a
chartered institution.

crofilm of the papers, the Trust I ing several students without places

1'i

has authorized publication by the
Harvard University Press of those
parts of the family archives which
are judged to be of general inter-
est and significance. Because of
the enormous labor of editing even
a fragment of a collection of many
thousands of pieces, years of work
will be required before the pro-
gram of publication in book form
can be brought to a close.
88 Reels Sent
Film reproduction will be finished
late in 1955. Eighty-eight reels
containing the diaries of John Ad-
ams, John Quincy, and Charles
Francis have already been dis-
patched to the participating 11-
braries.

to live,
The buildings are not fire-proof
and lack fire exits. They were
constructed by the government in
1947 to meet the need to house
married students.
CALIFORNIA - Later permis-
sions for women have become a
topic of discussion at the Universi-
ty of California.
Sophomores are seeking a 9 p.m.
weekly lockout instead of the pres-
ent 7:30 rule for sophomores and
freshmen. The Women's Executive
Board disapproved of this because
they thought it would interfere with
studying.
The board also denied the women

By SHIRLEY CROOG
CHICAGO-Pre-fabricated houses
at the University of Chicago face
possible removal June 1, 1955, leav-

a late minute make-up system on
the grounds that the enforcement
of the "lockout" rule would become
lax.
COLORADO-Abolishment of dis-
crimination clauses was highly fa-
vored by the Interfraternity Coun-
cil of the University of Colorado.
The committee on student organ-
izations and social life unanimous-
ly agreed that racial discrimina-
tion should be abolished in all
campus social groups and that the
university should not recognize any
new groups with such clauses. The
committee did not favor setting a
definite date to remove such
clauses.
Read and. Use
Daily 'Classifieds

By DONNA HANSON

1'

riculum. Square dances and coffee

LEONARD WARREN
. . . Met baritone
Students Told
Of Draft Test
Students whose academic year
ends in January have been urged
by Col. Arthur A. Holmes, Selective
Service director, to take the Col-
lege Qualification Test to be given
on Dec. 9.
Application blanks for this test
may be obtained from any draft
board and must be postmarked
not later than midnight Tuesday.
In order to be eligible for the
test, students must intend to re-
quest deferment, be enrolled in a
full-time course and be taking the
test for the first time.

A multitude of activities repre-
senting the various religious or-
ganizations of the University re-
volves around Lane Hall.
Some 40 types of activities, all
inter-religious in scope, have been
carried on in Lane Hall, Univer-
sity religious center. A few of these
activities include SRA Newsletter,
which provides an exchange of
news and ideas among those in-
terested in religious activities,
open forums and seminars.
Lane Hall sponsors a yearly re-
ligious lecture series which in-
cludes three lectures and two pan-
els.
Lane Hall also serves as a reli-
gious counseling center with rep-
resentatives from all established
denominations on campus to help
guide students and faculty.
Recreational activities compose
a large part of the Lane Hall cur-

I

hours are held weekly. A carol
sing, Christmas party, SRA picnic
and open house are included among
these activities. For all the stu-
dents who are unable to go home,
Lane Hall serves a Thanksgiving
breakfast.
Lane Hall Is available as a gen-
eral meeting place where students
come in to relax or watch TV in
the television lounge. A library,
craft shop, auditorium, music room
and photography dark room are
among the various facilities it of-
fers.

I

F

A

1 f-I

*

.

LEONARD WARREN

LEADING
BARITONE
METROPOLITAN
OPERA

T~EANN ARBOR BANK
offers you a plan to
BANK BY MAIL
Be sure to inquire about this plan:
SAVE TIME and MONEY
THE ANN ARBOR BANK
Corner Main and Huron Streets
U. of M. Branch, 330 South State
1108 South University
S* * *

|1

ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
Father McPhillip
William and Thompson Sts.
Sunday Masses-
8:00 - 9:30 - 11:00 - 12:00
Daily-7:00 - 8:00 - 9:00
Novena Devotions-Wednesday evenings-7:30
P.M.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East Huron, Phone NO 8-7332
Rev. C. H. Loucks, Minister
Beth Mahone, Asst. Student Counselor
Sunday, November 20-
9:45-Guild studies Mark
11:00-Sermon "In the Interest of Others"
6:45-Guild Meeting

",. SUNDAY
N+OV. 21, 8:30
Hill Auditorium
CHORAL UNION
SERIES
. Tickets: $3.50 - $2.50
$2.00- $1.50
__,at
UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY
BURTON MEMORIAL TOWER

MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. George Barger, Minister
10:45-Morning Worship. Sermon: YOU'VE
STORY TO TELL
9:45 A.M.-Church School

A

,'p

,Jim Walker asks-

Can a mechanical
engineer make
real progress in
a chemical firm?

CONGREGATIONAL-DISCIPLES STUDENT GUILD
7:00 P.M.-Congregational Church. Program:
WHEN YOU WORSHIP .. .
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 9:30 and at 10:45-Two Worship Op-
portunities, with the pastor preaching on
"Thanksgiving as Exemplified in Paul."
Sunday at 6:00-Gamma Delta, Lutheran Stu-
dent Club, Supper-Program. Initiation of New
Members, Showing of International Gamma
Delta Color Slides, and Business Meeting.
FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETING
Lane Hall
10:00 A.M.-Young Friends discussion meeting
at Lane Hall
11:00 A.M.-Meeting for Worship
3:30-5:30 P.M.-"Who Are the Quakers?" Cont.
An informal discussion period. 1117 West
Washington.
6:00 P.M.-Young Friends supper meeting. 308
Maple Ridge. Transportation from Lane Hall
at 6 P.M.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER AND
CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill and Forest Avenue
Dr. H. 0. Yoder, Pastor
Sunday-
9:00 and 11:00 A.M.-Worship Service and
Holy Communion
10:00 A.M.-Bible Study
6:00 P.M.-Lutheran Student Assn. Supper-
Program Following: Dr. Frank Madsen, Presi-
dent of the Michigan Synod, ULCA, will speak
on The Evanston Conference.
Tuesday-
7:15-8:15 P.M.-"Studies in Biblical Fith-
Dr. George Mendendhall ,
Wednesday-
7:20-7:40 A.M.-Thonksgiving Service
ST. NICHOLAS GREEK ORTHODOX
CHURCH
414 North Main
Rev. Father Eusebius A. Stephanou
9:30 A.M.-Matins Service
10:30 A.M.-Divine Liturgy
Alternate Thursdays, Nov. 4, 7:30 P.M.-Ortho-
dox Student Guild

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, Scientist
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
9:30 A.M.-Sunday School
11:00 A.M.-Sunday Morning Service
Nov. 21-Soul and Body
8:00 P.M.-Weanesday: Testimonial Service
A free reading room is maintained at 339 South
Main Street where the Bible and all authorized
Christian Science literature may be read, bor-
rowed or purchased.
Reading Room hours are Monday, 11:00 A.M.
to 9 P.M.; Tuesday-Saturday 11:00 A.M. to
5 P.M.; and Sunday 2:30 to 4:30 P.M.
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State and Huron Streets,
Phone NO 2-1121
Wm. C. Bennett, Pastor
10:00 A.M.-Sunday School
11:00 A.M.-"-The Love That Perishes"
6:00 P.M.-Student Guild
7:00 P.M.-"Weighed and Found Wanting"
Wednesday, 7:30 P.M.-Prayer Meeting,
We extend a cordial welcome to you. Come and
fellowship with us in the world of God.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
AND STUDENT CENTER
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Henry Kuizenga and George Laurent, Ministers
William S. Baker and Eduard Sue, University
Pastors
9:15 A.M.-Discussion, "What Do You Believe?"
11:00 A.M.-"This Grateful Faith"
5:45 P.M.-Post college age. Fun and get ac-
quainted
6:45 P.M. Westminster Guild Thanksgiving
8:00 P.M.-Vespers
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
120 South State Street
Merrill R. Abbey, Erland J. Wangdahl,
Eugene A. Ransom. Ministers
9:00 and 10:45 A.M.-Worship: "Is the World
Big Enough?" Dr. Abbey preaching.
9:30 and 10:15 A.M.-Student seminars. Topics:
Major Methodist Beliefs." and "Great Ideas
of the Bible."
5:30-Supper and Fellowship
6:45-Worship and Program. Discussion: "Aca-
demic Freedom and the Christian Faith." Dr.
James Morgan and Dr. Robert Thrall will be
the speakers.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw, Phone NO 2-0085
Edward H. Redman, Minister
Mr. and Mrs. G. C. Bailey, Advisor to Students
Mrs. Fay A. Kincaid, Director of Religious
Education
Miss Betsy Gidley, Organist
10:00 A.M.-Unitarian Adult Group. Professor
E. Lowell Kelley, "The Scientist in Today's
World."
11:00 A.M.-Service of Worship. Rev. Edward H.
Redman on "Our Pilgrim Heritage"
7:15 P.M.-Unitarian Student Group. Transpor-
tation from Lane Hall.
7:30 P.M. Meeting at the church.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed Churches
of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director
Res Ph. NO 5-4205. Office Ph. NO 8-7421
10:00 A.M.-Morning Service
7:00 P.M.-Evening Service
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
William and State Sts.
Minister-Rev. Leonard AR Parr
Minister to Students: Rev. H. L Pickeril;
Assoc. Sue Gillespie.
Public worship at 10:45 A.M. Subject of Dr. Parr's
sermon: "Where Not To Spend Thanksgiving."
Student Guild at 7:00 P.M. in Mayflower Room.
Program by worship committee on, "When
You Worship."

A.

,t

F
f

{:

, 4

RENT-A-CAR
Standard Rates
Include:
Gas and oil
and Insurance.
LUCV4SIU NO 3-4156
NO 8-9757
Nye Motor Sales
Inc.

James B. Walker received his B.S. in mechanical engineering from
North Carolina State College in June 1954, and he's presently working
for his M.S. at the same college. By asking pertinent questions, Jim is
making sure that the position he finally accepts will be the right one for
a fellow with his training.

4.

"Pick - -

Pickering answers:

H. M. Pickering, Jr., received a B.S. in M.E.
and E.E. from the Univ. of Minn. in 1940. He
gained valuable technical experience at Han-
ford Works, in Richland, Washington, and in
Du Pont's Fabrics and Finishes Plant at Parlin,
N. J. Today he is Works Engineer for Du Pont's
Seaford, Del., plant, where nylon comes from.

Z

-

Well, Jim, that's what the lawyers call a leading
question, and the answer leads right into my baili-
wick. I came to Du Pont in 1940, after taking a com-
bined mechanical and electrical engineering course.
So I had what you might call a double reason for
wondering about my future with a chemical firm.
I soon learned that the success of a large-scale
.n',in-:wn.nn a ;c xy;+QllAnr- nann 4 - .,nn rn-n nn--

along any one of these four broad highways to a top-
level position.
My own Du Pont experience includes mechanical
engineering work in fields as varied as atomic energy,
fabrics and finishes, and nylon manufacture. Every
one of these brought with it a new set of challenging
problems in construction, instrumentation, and
i ,n-t -. -.i..,. ad r n .,nrmAR,.rA +h haenr.+ of

BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL AND
REFORMED
423 South Fourth Ave.
Walter S. Press, Pastor
Warren Winkler, Director of Student Work
10;45 A.M.-Worship Service: Sermon by Rev,
William J. Kuhlman, Superintendent of the
Evangelical,-niChildIren's Home of Detroit Mich-

Prompt, prolonged
relief from acid
-9t indigestion.

THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
30 .st Ctadiim

11

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