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November 19, 1954 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-11-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19,1954

PAGE SIX TUE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19. 1954

Slippery Rock Eleven Beats
Wolverines on Gridiron (?)

I ankees,

Orioles

Swap Twelve

m en

By STEVE HEILPERN
"Slippery Rock trounces Michi-
gan by 30 points."
Nope, there's no typographical
error here. The small teachers'
college in Pennsylvania could con-
ceivably hand mighty Michigan a
decisive setba ck on the gridiron.
That is, if you believe in compara-
tive scores.
After carefully surveying this
year's collegiate football records,
we finally hit upon the way this
incredible feat could be accom-
plished:
Slippery Rock squeaked by Edin-
boro State Teachers, 7-0. Edin-
boro was in turn trounced by Car-
negie Tech, 26-6. Carnegie, how-
ever, edged Lafayette, 23-21. Lafay-
ette lost to Rutgers, 7-0, who was
defeated by William and Mary, 14-
7, who was walloped by powerful
Navy, 27-0.
At this point we see that Navy
is 52 points better than the little
corps from Pennsylvania. Navy,
however, could beat Michigan by
82 points, if this system is used,
giving Slippery Rock a 30-point ad-
vantage over the Wolverines.

Here's how:
Navy routed Duke, 40-7, who
handed North Carolina a 21-7 set-
back. The Tarheels surprised South
Carolina, 21-19, who dumped Army,
34-20.
And Army, as we all know, de-
Inflation!
COLUMBUS, Ohio (P)--Fren-
zied fans offered up to $30 yes-
terday for a ticket to Satur-
day's climactic Michigan-Ohio
State grid game, but there were
mighty few open market ducats
available.
Even the hard-hearted scalp-
ers, generally ready to grab a
fast buck, reportedly plan to
use their precious pasteboards
to attend the contest-sold out
some time ago.
feated Michigan, by a 26-7 score
here at Ann Arbor.
There are the figures, in black
and white. No longer can the name
of Slippery Rock be laughed at.

SOPH GRID STANDOUTS:
Maddock, Shannon Parallel Careers

By JUDIE CANTOR
The long train of Chicago-area
stars who have kept alive the Mich-
izan tradition has added two more
to its role with rising Wolverines
Ed Shannon and Jim Maddock.
Maddock and Shannon, who have
been close friends since grade
school days, played their high
school football at Fenwick High in
Oak Park, Illinois.
Athletes whom they knew from
high school days, such as Ted Ca-
chey, Fred Baer and John O'Reil-
ly, had already beaten the trail to
the Ann Arbor campus. It was
their success that inspired Shan-
non and Maddock to follow the ex-
ample.
In two years at Michigan these
boys have proven themselves many
times over on the gridiron. Al-
though finding college football a
much tougher game to play, inso-
far as every game is a big one
and the Michigan tradition is a
hard one to uphold, they have done
more than hold their own.
Both sophomores have shown
great potentiality on the gridiron
during their first year of varsity
competition. Maddock, as quarter-
back, has completed 15 out of 32
passes, has shown great ability as
a runner, and has been an asset on
defense.
SPORTS

JIM MADDOCK ED SHANNON
.. . to Michigan . .. from Fenwick

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He got his big chance in the Iowa
game, after Forrest Evashevski's
squad had scored two quick touch-
downs to take a 13-0 lead. The 187-
pounder took over the reins and
sparked the Wolverines to two
touchdowns and a 14-13 upset.
Another big moment for Maddock
was in the Illinois game, when he
scored the winning touchdown with
seconds remaining in the first
half. He was on the receiving end
of Michigan's famed transcontinen-
tal play, which beat the Illini, 14-7.
Shannon, a 172-pound halfback,
has bolstered coach Bennie Oos-
terbaan's running attack. A third-
stringer at the season's start, the
hard-chargingrunner has assumed
big responsibilities because of in-
juries to other backfield stalwarts.
Gets Big Chance

was injured, and broke into the
starting lineup when Ed Hickey's
name was added to' the casualty
list.
The first taste of football for the
Illinois-bred Wolverines came when
they played on opposing teams in
the same neighborhood.
Maddock and Shannon played
the quarterback and wing-back po-
sitions during their four years on
the high school gridiron-the same
spots they hold now.
During their junior year they
sparked Fenwick High in a fierce
battle for the parochial school
championship of the Chicago area.
Other high school sports captured
the interests of these versatile ath-
letes once the football season
closed. Fenwick's swimming team
gained Shannon, while Maddock
displayed his ability on the bas-
ketball court.

Rebuilding N
Turley, Larse
NEW YORK (N)-The New York
Yankees snared two young starting
pitchers and a regular' shortstop
from Baltimore yesterday in a deal
involving at least 12 players worth
over $500,000, probably the biggest
trade in baseball history.
Making a spectacular move to
bolster their pitching staff after
losing their first pennant inn six
years, the Yanks grabbed Bob Tur-
ley, league strikeout king, and Don
Larsen. They also acquired Billy
Hunter to take over Phil RizZuto's
shortstop job. The Yanks said no
cash was involved.
Gene Woodling, veteran outfield-
er on Casey Stengel's five straight
winners from 1949 through 1953,
went to the Orioles with right-
handed pitchers Harry Byrd and
Jim McDonald, shortstop Willie
Miranda and two kid catchers,
Gus Triandos and Hal Smith.
Three More to Go
Three more men will go to Bal-
timore in the deal. The Yanks will
get three or four additional play-
ers, either from the Orioles or their
farm system, but that will be a
separate deal at a later date.
George Weiss, Yankee general
manager, said the other men
should be named "within a week or
so, to allow for waivers and the
minor league draft meeting next
Monday."
Most of the nation had read of
the big deal in their morning pa-
pers. The story was developed late
Wednesday night by The Associat-
ed Press.
Baltimore Fans Angry
Sparks of angry comment flew
in Baltimore from fans who were
upset over the trade, particularly
at the loss of Turley. "Horrible,
rotten, crazy, dirty" were some of
the milder words. There was a
rare "I'm all for it."
One of the first to claim the deal
meant another flag for the Yan-
kees was Hunter, who said, "If
the Yanks got Turley and Larsen,
they're a shoo-in for the pennant
next year."
Baltimore General Manager Paul
Richards explained he made the
deal to "get the hitting and bal-

ew York Gets
n and Hunter
ance necessary to make a first di-
vision contendet." He called Tri-
andos and Smith "two of the, most
promising prospects in baseball"
and added "we're not through yet
making deals. We might trade a
catcher." First basemen Dick Kry-
hoski and Eddie Waitkus and
catcher Clint Courtney are labeled
surplus.
n Weiss came to the support of
Richards, who he said "needed no
defense." The Yankee general
manager asked, "Where would
Richards be with last year's ball
! club? They (Baltimore fans) will
get over it. If I was. Richards,
I'd rather have them sore at me
now than in July."
f Stengle Optimistic
At his home in Glendale, Calif.,
Stengel said, "I hope these new
men will help our club. I don't
know. I suggest that you get in
touch with Turley and Larsen and
ask them how good they are going
to be." He said it was decided at
the end of the season the Yanks
% "possibly needed" a third, and
fourth pitcher and shortstop help.
With Allie Reynolds and 'Johnny
Sain on the doubtful list for 1955,
the Yanks obviously .needed pitch-
ing help.
Turley, 24-year-old right handed
fireballer, led the league with 185
strikeouts and compiled a 14-15
record for seventh place Balti-
more. Larsen, 25, another right-
hander,Lhad a sorry 3-21 record
but he was 7-12 in 1953 with the St.
Louis Browns. A fine hitter, he
had been tried in the outfield.
Hunter, 26, probably will be the
Yankee shortstop, displacing the
f 36-year-old Rizzuto.
Woodling, 32, a Yankee since '49,
had his poorest season last sum-
mer, hitting only .250. He was in-
jured often and missed many
games.
Byrd came to the Yanks last
winter from Philadelphia in a five-
man deal. The 29-year-old right-
hander failed to live up to expec-
tations and finished with a 9-7
record. McDonald, 27, formerly
with Boston and St. Louis, had a
4-1 season for Stengel, appearing
in only 16 games.
Triandos, 24, a strapping right-
hand hitter, who was tried as a
first baseman and catcher in brief
whirls with the Yanks, hit .296 at
Kansas City last summer. Smith,
23, on option to Columbus, Ohio
of the American Assn. for the year,
led the league with a .350 average.

Cross Country
r
Title Second
For Michigan
1922 Last Time M'
Big Ten Champions
By CORKY SMITH
Michigan's victory in the Big
Ten cross country meet at Chi-
cago last week gave the Wolver-
ines their second Conference title
in the 'hill and dale' sport.
On Nov. 25, 1922, Coach Steve
Farrell's squad of about 25 men
traveled to Lafayette, Ind., with
strong hopes of bringing back a
first place. The sky was overcast
and a north wind flew across the
course during the race. However,
Coach Farrell's runners were not
to be halted by adverse weather,
and the Wolverines won the meet
with a low score of 41.
Wisconsin followed Michigan
with 51 points, andsbehind the
Badgers were Illinois, 72, Ohio
State, 141, and Minnesota, 149.
Michigan's big gun was E. R.
Isbell, who was proclaimed by a
Daily scribe of that time as the
"greatest cross country runner in
the middle west." The claim seems
to have been founded for he never
lost a race up to the time of the
Big Ten Meet, and in that race
he finished 400 yards ahead of the
second place runner. His time was
a' swift 26:33.1. over nearly four
miles of hilly terrain.
The Conference cross country
meet attracted a crowd of 5,000
spectators, representing many of
the Big Ten schools. Isbell was
given a generous ovation when he
crossed the tape, in front of 60
runners who began the gruelling
distance.
Coach Farrell expressed his sor-
row that Isbell was graduating the
following spring, for he indeed
was the mainstay of the 1922 cross
country squad.
The regular 'hill and dale' men
of the '22 team were given track
letters for their efforts, the first
Wolverine cross country squad to
be so awarded.
The season lasted' longer into
colder weather than today, but
apparently later coaches felt the
cold and sloppy weather, which
the harriers often encountered,
was too much to contend with.
Michigan's cross country schedule
ended on a high note last week
with the annexation of the Con-
ference crown.

4

JACK HORWITZ
Night Editar

He moved up to second-string
right halfback when Tony Branoff

II

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