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November 17, 1954 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-11-17

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGE~AN nAV .V

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WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 195

ONE OF TWO SURVIVORS:
Drake Recalls Chequamegon Band

Japanese Students Find
Life in U.S. Surprising

T ELUE fltvr'

By DAVID KAPLAN
Dr. Rollin E. Drake, '88D, one of
two survivors of the Chequamegon
Band and Orchestra, now stays in
comparative seclusion after ca-
reers in music, dentistry and min-
ing.
Dr. Drake was one of ten original
members of the group.
Founded in 1884, the Chequame-
gon Band is the forerunner of to-
day's University Symphony Orches-
tra. Established by Frederick
Weir, '88M, and Dr. Drake's broth-
er Homer who graduated from Den-
tistry School in 1885, the Band soon
became a popular orchestra in Ann
Arbor.
They were constantly in demand
for commencement exercises in
University Hall, class day pro-
grams and engagements in Jack-
son and the upper peninsula.
Named after a bay where the
group gave its first performance,
the Band spent several summers
playing in Mackinac, Mackinac Is-
land, Marquette and Lake Superior
Hotels.
No Credit Given
Recalling some of the Orches-
tra's early days, Dr. Drake com-
mented on the fact that no credit
was given toward graduation for
any of the group's activities.
"We had to buy our own music,
hire halls and make contracts,"
Dr. Drake said.
One of the group's longest en-
gagements was with the Whitney
Theatre on Main which is soon to
be demolished. "The rottener the
show, the more the music was
needed," Dr. Drake commented.
"We would play in the pit," he
continued, "while the greats like
Edwin Booth and Madame Modjes-
ka were on stage. For those en-
gagements each man was paid $1.37
per engagement, including rehear-
sal time."
Chequamegon History
Collecting material on the Band
through the years, Dr. Drake in-
tends to leave Chequamegon's his-
tory with a Historical Society.
The group dissolved in 1896," Dr.
Drake said, "due to evolution in
dancing and increased demand for
small orchestras. All they needed
was a piano and a drum for a two-
step," Dr. Drake explained.
After leaving the University,
members of the Chequamegon Band
went into various fields. Some be-
came bankers, dentists and judges.
Others became research workers,
industrialists and businessmen. One
of the orchestra's violinists went
into Victor Herbert's Orchestra in
Pittsburgh.

By MARY ANN THOMAS

Life in the United States, com-
pared to that of Japan, is a con-
tinual surprise to 16 Japanese stu-
dents visiting the campus for the
15th annual Japan-America Con-
ference.
"We realized that America is
rich in natural resources," student
leader of the delegation Niro Oh-
take exclaimed, "but everything
was just hearsay, from books."
Machines and Schools
"I was surprised as soon as I
arrived at San Francisco," the
young economics student contin-
ued. "It's a country of machines,
large buildings, schools and auto-
mobiles."
Commenting that seeing is be-
lieving, Ohtake said more young
people should be able to visit the
United States to see what it is
really like.
President pro-tempore of the
International Student Association
of Japan which sponsors the six-
week tour, Ohtake observed there
is a vast difference between Amer-
ican and Japanese universities.
"They are enjoying themselves

while we are suffering," he com-
mented, explaining that Japanese
schools can not provide the li-
braries, educational or athletic
equipment to which American stu-
dents are accustomed.
Work To Eat
"Many of us must hold jobs to
earn money for our next meal in
addition to trying to study with-
out the aid of good library facili-
ties," he continued.
Coming to Michigan from the
first session at Stanford Univer-
sity, Ohtake commented that he
could not find serious-minded stu-
dents among the undergraduates.
"American students are only in-
terested in football and girl
friends," the group leader observ-
ed," while Japanese students are
interested in political and eco-
nomic movements."
He did find that Michigan stu-
dents in oriental studies were "very
eager to know the Japanese cul-
ture" and he felt that his visit
to the campus was the best or-
ganized program the group has
had.

-Daily-Dick Gaskill
AN EARLY PHOTOGRAPH of the Chequamegon Band and Or-
chetstra. Dr. Rollin E. Drake is shown in the second row, second
from the left.

The only other survivor of the
Band besides Dr. Drake is William
Ball, '90E, a retired electrical en-
gineer in Los Angeles.
Dr. Drake's position in the or-
chestra was as librarian and trom-
bone player. After he was gradu-
ated from Dentistry school, Dr.
Drake went to the upper peninsula
and set up a practice.
Comfortable Climate
"Cool and comfortable summer
climate persuaded me to go up
North," Dr. Drake said.
Settling in Negaunee, he was
married, practiced dentistry for 25
years and when his son was old
enough to go to college, came down
to Ann Arbor.
While his son was in school, Dr.
Drake took courses in minerology
and geology. When his sabbatical
year was up in 1912, he decided to
stay here.
He was on the dentistry faculty
for a while as student assistant in
laboratory work and in operative
dentistry, remaining until 1919.
That same year, he stopped his
dental practice.
Through his interest in geology,
Dr. Drake became a trustee in an
estate owning mining property in
Minnesota and Michian. He was

president of a company that owned
the land on which taconite is now
being produced.
Dr. Drake severed his connection
with the company in August, 1951,
and now does gem cutting as a
hobby.
Raking Leaves
Dr. Drake lives with his wife
and son on Cambridge where he
can be found raking the leaves in
the fall on his acre of land. His
four grandchildren live on both the
East and West coasts and his six
great - grandchildren are spread
throughout the country.
As a member of a group which
was the ancestor of the University
Symphony, Dr. Drake feels that
the Symphony is "immense." "You
can work and get credit for it and
at the same time enjoy music," he
noted.
Commenting on modern music,
Dr. Drake said that there are no
Schuberts or Mendelssohns grow-
ing up today. "As for modern mu-
sic," he added, "most of it is a
pain in the neck. I'm sorry even
jazz developed."
Evans To Talk
On .Education
Careth Lloyd Evans, representa-
tive for the British summer
schools, will be on campus Friday
and Saturday to discuss opportuni-
ties for study there.
Four programs will be offered
in 1955. The University of Birming-
ham will offer a course in Shakes-
peare and Elizabethan drama in
Stratford-on-Avon. Art, literature
and music in England from 1660 to
1780 will be offered by the Uni-
versity of London.
Courses last six weeks and sev-
eral scholarships are offered. Ap-
plicatitons must be completed and
returned by March 28.
RENT-A-CAR

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

LEONARD WARREN

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the University
of Michigan for which the Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial responsi-
bility. Publication in it is construc-
tive notice to all members of the
University. Notices should be sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 35531
Administration Building before 2 p.m.
the day preceding publication (be-
fore 10 a.m. on Saturday). Notice of
lectures, concerts, and organization
meetings cannot be published oftener
than twice.
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 1954
Vol. LXV, No. 48
Notices
Regents' Meeting: Fri., Dec. 17. Com-
munications for consideration at this
meeting must be in the President's
hands not later than Thurs., Dec. 9.
Late permission for women students
who attended the Jorge Bolet Concert
Mon., Nov. 15, will be no later than
11:30 p.m.
Students who are now securing their
new license plates (1955) should re-
cord the change with the Office of
Student Affairs, 1020 Administration
Building, at this time.
Notice is hereby given that the Uni-
versity automobile regulations will be
lifted from 5:00 p.m. Wed., Nov. 24.
until 8:00 a.m. Mon., Nov. 29.
British Summer Schools will be
represented in Ann Arbor Fri., Nov. 19
by Careth L. Evans of the University of
Birmingham. He is here to publicize
the international summer schools at
Oxford, London, Stratford, and Edin-
burgh. Mr. Evans would like to meet
faculty members and students inter-
estecd in Offerings in Britain for the
summer of 1955.Furtherhinformation
may be obtained in the Graduate
School Office.
Pan-Hel Ball pictures may be picked
up at the League Lobby between 12:30
and 5:30 p.m. Wed. and Thurs., Nov.
17 and 18.
Union Art Contest. Entries must be
turned in by Wed., Nov. 17 between
4:00 p.m. and 6:00 p.m. in the room
across from Union Student Offices.
Today is the last day entries can be
turned in.
Teaching Candidates: The following
school representatives will be on cam-
pus to interview prospective teachers:
Livonia, Michigan - Representatives
from Livonia, Michigan Public Schools
will be on campus Thurs., Nov. 18 to
interview candidates for Kindergarten
and Early Elementary teaching posi-
tions.

LEADING
BARITONE
METROPOLITAN
OPERA

Mount Clemens, Michigan-A repre-
sentative from the Mount Clemens,
Michigan Public Schools will be on
campus Tues., Nov. 23. She would like
to interview all interested elementary
candidates.
If interested, contact The Bureau
of Appointments, 3528 Administration
Bldg., NO 3-1511, Ext. 489.
PERSONNEL REQUESTS:
Lincoln Labs, Inc., Decatur, Ill., is
seeking a Professional Medical Repre-
sentative. The applicant should be
22-32 years old, with a bachelor's de-
gree or higher, major in science or
sales.
Goshen Div. of General Time Corp.,
Goshen, Ind., needs a Mech. Engineer
with design ability.
Wood Conversion Co., Cloquet, Min-
nesota, has an opening in the Mech.
Engrg. Section of the Development
Dept. for a Mech. Engineer who has
had a year or more of practical exper-
ience.
The Milwaukee Co., Chicago, Ill., is
interested in employing college gradu-
ates in finance positions. This is an
investment firm, and the positions
will be in sales.
National Seal Co., Van Wert, Ohio, is
interested in securing graduates in
Engrg., Liberal Arts, or BusAd. for
immediate placement as Trainees. This
is a division of the Nat'l. Motor Bear-
ing Co. with plants in California.
The Women's Medical Specialist
Corps. offers women college graduates
opportunities for training in Dietetics,
Physical Therapy, and Occupational
Therapy. For each of these the appli-
cant must have completed work for a
bachelor's degree in biology, psychology,
science, sociology, and home econom-
ics. After completion of the training
program, trainees are eligible for a
commission.
For further information about any
of the above or about other job op-
portunities, contact the Bureau of
Appointments, Ext. 371, Room 3528
Admin. Bldg.
Lectures
American Chemical Society Lecture.
Wed., Nov. 17, 8:00 p.m. in Room 1300
Chemistry. Dr. Alsoph H. Corwin of
Johns Hopkins University will speak on
"Colors of Life."
John Dos Passos Lecture Tickets on
sale today and tomorrow at Hill Au-
ditorium box office. John Dos Passos
will speak tomorrow at 8:30 p.m. on
"Jefferson's Times." Box office open
(Continued on Page 4)
CHARtER A GRYNUN
GO TGETHER
To:Sports Events - Parties!
Convenient, private, amazing-
ly low in cost. Try it!
IM.. h.= =
Our STUDENT SUPPLY
department is designed
for your shopping pleasure
Buy in the modern way
Self Selection
Shop and Save at
FOLLETTS
Stat" St. at ". University

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone NO 23-24-1
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .66 1.47 2.15
3 .77 1.95 3.23
4 .99 2.46 4.31
Figure 5 average words to o line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
11:00 A.M. Saturday
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-One brown wallet containing
valuable papers. Probably lost in
State Theater. Lost Wednesday night.
Finder may keep money, return pap-
ers to Rhea Slotkin, 602 Lawrence,
NO 2-2545. )39A
LOST: Small brown coin purse with
three important keys attached. Re-
ward. NO 3-0521, Ext. 150. )40A
LOST: GOLD MILITARY Gruen watch
with green plaid band. Reward. Call
NO 2-6757. )41A
FOR SALE
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords-$6.88. Sox,
39c; shorts 69c: military supplies.
Sam's Store, 122 Z. Washington. )26B
NEW LIGHT WEIGHT BICYCLES, fully
equipped $39.95, repair on all makes,
NO 8-7187, Corner of Main and Madi-
son. )120B
1947 PLYMOUTH four door sedan, radio
and heater. The big lot across from
the downtown carport. Huron Motor
Sales. 222 W. Washington, NO 2-4588.
)104B
1946 CHEVROLET CLUB COUPE, new
overhaul, good rubber, radio and heat-
er. The big lot across from the car
port. Huron Motor Sales. 222 W. Wash-
ington. NO 2-4588. )76B
1950 CHEVROLET convertible. Radio.
Top condition, runs very good. The
big car lot across from downtown
carport. Huron Motor Sales. 222 W.
Washington. NO 2-4588. )13B
THREE CHOICES-1951 Chevrolets. Ra-
dios, heaters, power glide. All four
doors. The big car lot cross from
downtown carport. Huron Motor
Sales. 222 W. Washington. NO 2-4588.
)135B
The Best for Least
in Used Cars
1947 PLYMOUTH sedan. Good
body, good tires. $195.
1950 NASH. Good shape through-
out. Motor reconditioned. $395.
1951 ENGLISH VANGAURD. An
ideal first or second car. Per-
fect condition. Will do 40
miles to a gallon. $495.
1950 PLYMOUTH CONVERT-
IBLE with radio and heater.
An ideal time to buy now. $395.
ti
TWO USED CAR LOTS:
503 E. Huron, NO 2-3261; East Ann
Arbor, corner of Packard and
Platt. NO 2-0170. Both lots open
evenings until 9:00 p.m.
Herb Estes, Inc.
)141B
1952 MERCURY. Four door sedan, radio
and heater. Very clean. The big car
lot across from downtown carport.
Huron Motor Sales. 222 W. Washing-
ton. NO 2-4588. )134B
1951 FORD V-8. Custom deluxe two
door. Excellent condition. All acces-
sories. Private owner. Call NO 3-0228.
)142B
MAN'S GEARED EUROPEAN BIKE,
equipped, in good condition, $27. NO
2-9621. )144B
GIRL'S BALLOON TIRE BIKE. $15. Ph.
NO 3-3132, After five. )145B
FOR RENT
FREE LIVING ACCOMMODATIONS-
on campus for married couple in ex-
change for household duties. NO
3-8454. )1G

FOR RENT
Deluxe Bachelor Apartment
Will hold two. Building in rear. Pri-
vate entrance. Electric stove, refriger-
ator, Simmons bed. US 23 off Wash-
tenaw Road, between Ypsilanti and
Ann Arbor. Everything new and
clean. $67.50 a month. Available Nov.
19. Phone NO 2-9020. )18D
FOUR ROOM HOUSE, with bath, furn-
ished, in country. Call NO 5-3371,
after 5 P.M. )13C
ROOMS FOR RENT
ROOMS FOR FOOTBALL WEEKENDS.
Reserve rooms now. Student Room
Bureau. No fee charged. NO 3-8454. )4D
ROOMS FOR FOOTBALL WEEKENDS.
Reserve rooms now at the Campus
Tourist Homes. 518 E. William (near
State St.) Ph. NO 3-8454. )3D
OVERNIGHT GUESTS-Large pleasant
sleeping room-twin beds, next to
tile bath. Call after 4:00 p.m. Mrs.
Harold Andrus, NO 8-749$. )20D
HELP WANTED: FEMALE
STEWARD Ia
To manage large scale kitchen oper-
ation and food service at Girl's Train-
ing School in Adrian. Prefer some-
one with one year of experience and
graduation from college with major
in hotel administration. Position
available immediately. Salary $80
weekly to start. Write Michigan Civil
Service, Recruiting, Lewis Cass Build-
ing, Lansing 13. )3Q
HELP WANTED: MALE
STEWARD Ia
To manage large scale kitchen oper-
ation and food service at Girl's Train-
ing School in Adrian. Prefer some-
one with one year of experience and
graduation from college with major
in hotel administration. Position
available immediately. Salary $80
weekly to start. Write Michigan Civil
Service, Recruiting, Lewis Cass Build-
ing, Lansing, 13. 2P

BUSINESS SERVICES
WASHING-Finished work and hand
ironing. Rough dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone NO 2-9020 Wool
soxs washed also. 18I
R. A. MADDY-VIOLIN MAKER. Fine
instruments, Accessories, Repairs. 310
S. State, upstairs. Phone NO 2-5962.
)10I
RADIO-PHONO-TV
Service and Sales
Free Pick-Up and Delivery
Fast Service - Reasonable Rates
"Student Service"
ANN ARBOR RADIO AND TV
1217 S. University, Phone NO 8-7942
1% blocks east of East Eng. )481
REAL ESTATE
CALL WARD REALITY
NO 2-7787
for 2x3 bedroom homes-priced for
students. Evenings call:
Mr. Hadcock NO 2-5863
Mr. Rice 3YP 2740-M
Mr. Garner NO 3-2761
Mr. Martin NO 8-8608
Mr. Schoot NO 3-2763 )20
REDECORATED HOUSE for sale. In-
quire: 1405 Hill St. NO 3-3384. )30
MISCELLANEOUS
IMPORTED Swiss, Dutch, Belgian, and
English Candies. Washington Fish
Market. 208 E. Washington. Tel NO
2-2589. 17L
VISIT THE Curio Shop, 609 E. Wash-
ington, two blocks from campus-
books, curios and antiques. Open
1-5 P.M. )18L

PERSONAL
EIGHT MONTH SPECIALS-Life $3.00;
Time and Newsweek $2.00. Student JANUARY
Periodical, NO 2-3061. )36F

Doors Open 12:45
Shows at
1, 3, 5, 7, 9 P.M.

Matinees 65c
Nights 900

NoTING BEATS THE ITEMENTOF
as th In jun-Loveein DELMER DAVES'
WARNER -
BROS.
WARN ERCOLOR .STEREOPHONIC SOUND
Also Woody Woodpecker Cartoon
FRIDAY

1.

I '

I

The Ultimate in High Suspense
GINGER ROGERS VAN HEFLIN

"BLACK WIDOW"
GENE TIERNEY

SUNDAY
SNOV. 21, 830
Hill Auditorium
CHORAL UNION
SERIES
Tickets: $3.50 - $2.50
- . $2.00-$1.50
aat
UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY
BURTON MEMORIAL TOWER

U of M Gilbert and Sullivan Society
presents
Pirates of Penzance
or
THE SLAVE OF DUTY
Student Rates - Tonight and Thursday
Lydia Mendelssohn Theater 8:00 P.M.

LICENSEI
Nye

Standard Rates
Include:
Gas and oil
and Insurance.
Phone
NO 3-4156
NO 8-9757
Motor Sales
Inc.

U5

I

A

MORE ACCLAIM...,
FOR THE MOST
ACCLAIMED
PICTURE
OF 19541

1

OP

//

DAY!

S 1AK II'U UI

'Ili,

4164

IA

0

The Theosophical Society in Ann Arbor
presents
A PUBLIC LECTURE
"CREATION FROM AN OCCULT
POINT OF VIEW"
The public is cordially invited. No admission charge.

'

Venie Film Fetlva

I

BUY AS
YOU RENT!
ANN ARBOR
OFFICE MACHINES
,11 Eost Liberty
Phone NO 8-8727

'I

I

"As far as rm concerned, Columbia's Marlon
Brando starrer 'On the Waterfront' has
already won every Academy Award. Hollywood
doesn't even have to bother voting."
Walter Winchell
"One of the most exciting films ever made
in the United States. The performance of
Brando is one of the finest things any man,
has done on the screen."
Saturday Review
"'On the Waterfront' is a brilliant
movie. Marlon Brando gives hisI

MICHIGAN UNION

Wednesday, November 17, 8:00 P.M.

How to go to
College ...
and MAKE
MONEY

I

TOMORROW --8:30 P.M.
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN LECTURE COURSE
presents
The Great American Author
John Dos Pssos
A prominent Literary Critic recently said that the four great-

Here's a rare opportunity for you
to earn money without leaving
your campus.
You have a chance to be a repre-
sentative of American Youth
Abroad, the largest low-cost Eur-
ope travel service in Central Unit-

S

w w . a . as

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