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November 16, 1954 - Image 5

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-11-16

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TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 1954

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

0 A *14I Z+TWV

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 1954 THE MTCHIGAN BAIT.V U~ A U ~qww,

PAGE FIaVE~

jr

Accident Prevention Week Begins

Men Receive
Most Injuries
On Campus
By DEDE ROBERTSON
Accident Prevention Week, a
time set aside annually by the
National Safety Council to bring
about an awareness of common
accident causes and thus prevent
their occurrence, is being observed
this week.
Statistics compiled by the Uni-
versity Health Service reveal that
in this campus community, more
injuries are received by male stu-
dents while playing football, both
varsity and intramural, than by
all other reasons combined. Among
female students, the largest num-
ber of accidents are caused by
home and residence mishaps. This
cause accounts for the second
largest number of male student ac-
cidents.
Unusual Campus Accidents
Several unusual campus acci-
dents have occurred recently. In
one instance reported, a coed's
alarm clock sounded off at 6:30.
Still dreaming, the coed walked
right off of the top bunk of a dou-
ble decker bed without realizing
where she was. She hit the floor
in a heap and seriously injured
her leg.
In another unusual occurrence, a
student was riding his bike when
"a large box appeared suddenly"
in front of him in the road. He
swerved to miss it but couldn't
and flew head first over the han-
* die bars and broke his arm.
The most recent incidence oc-

opinion Poll
Results Given
To Assembly
Association Suggests
SGC Plan Discussion
For Women Students
At yesterday's Assembly Dormi-
tory Council meeting, coeds re-
ported the result of an opinion poll
indicating the feelings of the resi-
dents on the proposed Student Gov-
ernment Constitution.
The results definitely showed
that at present the majority of
students represented "don't know
enough about the plan to vote."
Comments from house represen-
tatives ranged from "It's a pretty
good idea" to "No oni in the house
cares."
Assembly president Hazel Frank
and Mary Jo Park emphasized the
necessity for students to be thor-
oughly acquainted with the propo-
sal before they would be quali-
fied to vote on the Student Legis-
lature referendum.
Present Views At Each House
They suggested that each house
invite a woman who is extremely
interested and well-informed on the
differences between present stu-
dent governmentwand SGC to pre-
sent her views at a house meet-
inng.
Assembly also discussed the
problem of getting coeds to attend
corridor meetings. It was reported
that many of the houses found it
difficult to get satisfactory attend-
ance and methods of remedying the
problem were discussed.
Representatives considered the
possibility of imposing fines for
absences, but the question of le-
gality of such a penalty arose.
Further investigation will precede
decision.
Survey of Residence Halls
Other issues considered were a
survey of residence halls to deter-
mine the number of women who
felt the necessity for having a li-
brary open on Sunday night and
the advisability of weekly talks
with dietitians of the houses.
The "non-perishable" dinner for
needy Ann Arbor families, sched-
uled for Thursday night, was an-
nounced. Canned food and pack-
aged items will be collected in
women's residence hall dining
rooms.

-.~.~Petitioning ToOpen
S ~>........~For PanohelPositions

j__._

Petitioning for Panhellenic Asso-
ciation's Greek Week and Variety
Show positions will be open today.
through next Tuesday.
Interviews for chairmanships
will take place from 3 p.m. to 5
p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 30 through Fri-
day, Dec. 3. Students may sign up
for interviews in the League Un-
dergraduate office.
Panhellenic chairman of Greek
Week is Virginia Abbey while Jer-
alee Fox will serve as finance
chairman.
Panhellenic Association is open-
ing the following positions to any
sorority woman: co-chairman for
booklet committee, one chairman
for Presidential conference, Pan-
hellenic tea chairman, chairman of
Panhellenic work shop, Greek
Week secretary, a social commit-
tee consisting of IFC Sing support
chairman, exchange dinners and
picnic chairman and speakers
chairman.
Variety Show positions opened by
Panhel and general chairman, as-
sistant general chairman, arrange-
ments chairman, general publicity

chairman with three assistants, ra-
dio and record shop chairman,
newspapers chairman, p a slt e r 's
chairman, ushers dhairman and
secretary.
Information for petitioning can
be obtained in the League Library
and from Panhel delegates of each
house.
j FOR GROVlP TRAVEL IN L VlURY
CNARTER A BROWOUND
GO TOGETHER
To: Sports Events -- Parties!
Convenient, private, amazing-
ly low in cost. Try it!
Read and Use
Daily Classi fieds

-Daily-MarJ Crozier
PROJECTS CONTINUE IN UNIVERSITY ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
School of Education Courses
Reach Diamond Anniversary

-Daily-Chuck Kelsey
ACCIDENT-Injured during freshman football scrimmages, Bruce
Korzilius recently received his leg cast after an operation for torn
ligaments. Reconciled to long weeks of hobbling, Korzilius
thoughtfully reads an accident prevention folder in Health
Service.

By ELAINE EDMONDS

curred at the Michigan State Col-
lege-Michigan football game last
Saturday. A woman was walking
ur the stadium steps after the
gamehand fell over backwards
down the steps breaking her arm.
More Males Injured
"Among students on this cam-
pus approximately twice as many
men are injured as women," ac-

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cording to the Health Service re-
ports. "This finding can be partial-
ly accounted for by the fact that
more men engage in strenuous
sports than women and therefore
are more liable to be injured,"
Dr. Warren E. Forsythe, director
of Health Service commented.
Most student accident injuries
occur at the beginning and at the
end of the school year, according
to Health Service reports. Dr. For-
sythe remarked that this could be
due to nervous tension and exces-
sive hurrying.
Health Service reports also state
that during the school year, about
84,500 visits are made to the Health
Service by students. Sixteen hun-
dred admissions are made to the
University Hospital.
In non-campus communities, na-
tional statistics reveal that more
accidents occur in the home than
anywhere else. The chief cause of
these accidents is hurrying to go
somewhere or to get something
done quickly.

FAIR EXCHANGE:
Union Services Committee
Helps Students Sell Tickets

This year marks the 75th anni-
versary of courses in professional
education at the University.
When the first education courses
were introduced to the University,
in 1879 there was only one "holder
of the chair," as professors were
called in those days. This was Wil-
liam H. Payne.
The staff of the education school
has grown from one professor in
1879 to 81 staff members in 1954.
Full Calendar
The School of Education has
planned a full calendar of events
and activities for their anniversary
year.
According to Claude Eggertsen,
professor of education and chair-
man of the planning committee for
the celebration, the purposes of the
celebration are to spotlight the sig-
nificance of the professional educa-
tion of teachers, to inform the peo-
ple of Michigan about the contribu-
tions of the School of Education
to the state and to focus the at-
tention of the School of Education
on plans for the future.
A series of four lectures on the
development of teacher education
have been scheduled for various
times throughout the year.
Lecture Given
The first lecture, "The Profes-
sional Study of Education in Ger-
man Universities in the 19th Cen-
tury," was given by Prof. Erich
Hylla of Frankfurt Am Main, Ger-
many on Nov. 5.
The other three lectures will ge
given onhthe subjects "The Estab-
Deadline Nears
For Art Entries
Today and tomorrow mark the
last opportunity for potential Rock-
wells and Rembrandts to enter
their works in the second annual
Union-sponsored Student Art Ex-
hibit to be shown Dec. 4 through
15 in the Union lobby.
First and second prizes will be
awarded in each of five mediums.
These divisions include oil paint-
ing; water colors; drawings in
tempra, charcoal, ink and pencil;
prints done by lithograph, etching
and wood cuts, and sculpture in
wood, stone and metal.
Prizes will total $150 Dick Ru-
zumna, contest chairman, reports.
First place winners will receive
$20 gift certificates from local
stores while second awards will be
$10 certificates.
Works may be turned in from 4
to 6 p.m. today and tomorrow
across from the Student Offices
at the Union.
Students may enter up to three
creations in any one medium and
may compete in three different
mediums.

lishment of the Michigan Profes-
sorship of the Science and Art of
Teaching," "The Place of Labora-
tory Schools in Teacher Educa-
tion" and "The Professional Edu-
cation of Teachers in American
Life Today."

With the cooperation of the Uni-
versity Broadcasting Service, the
School of Education will produce
three half-hour radio programs for
use on radio stations throughout
the state.
Radio Broadcasts
The topics for these programs
will be "Professor Payne is Ap-
pointed," "John Dewey and Public
Education in Michigan" and "The
University Begins to Educate Ele-
mentary School Teachers."
Tentative plans have been made
to select 75 "master" Michigan
teachers, one from each graduat-
ing class since 1879. Pictures, bio-
graphical data and information
about each career will be gathered.
The School of Education will co-
operate with the television depart-
ment to present several 15 minute
television programs about features
of the School.
Also on the agenda for this an-
niversary year is the issuance of
a special publication "On the Next
Quarter Century," which will con-
tain articles such as "The First
Seventy-Five," "Our Plans for the
Future" and "A Joint Enterprise."

I

By JANE FOWLER
Want a ticket to that sell-out
concert or trip?
Mark Gallon and his Union Stu-
dent Services Committee are just
the people to see if you wish to ei-
ther buy or sell tickets for athlet-
ic events, dances, concerts and
campus shows.
As a service to University stu-
dents, the group has set up a pro-
gram by which men and women
may obtain hard-to-get seats or
sell tickets which they will be un-
able to use.
Great Demand
Originlaly slated to cover only

football games, tthe service has
proved so successful and demand
has been so great that the plan
has been expanded to include all
campus affairs.
In the two year history of the re-
sale plan, Gallon reports that all
tickets have been sold. The recent
Minnesota game set a record with
350 being handled by the Union of-
fice.
The plan was initiated to meet
the problem created by a Univer.
sity policy that no refunds may be
made for entertainment for ath-
letic events.
Sold at Regular Price
Anyone who has passes which
he desires to have sold may bring
them to the Union Student Offices
between 3 and 5 p.m. on week days.
Here they will be sold at regular
prices for the Union makes no
charge on the part of either the
purchaser or the ticket holder.
Concert and show seats may be
picked up any afternoon at the of-
fice.
Besides aiding students who can't
use the tickets they have pur-
chased, the plan offers an oppor-
tunity for obtaining better seats
than are often left in regular sales
and provides a possibility for pick-
ing up last minute tickets to sell-
out affairs.

/s'

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I

4cPAJ4 Camnpus

I

LEAGUE COUNCIL-There will
be a League Council meeting at 4
p.m. today in the League. Room
number will be posted.
* * *
JGP-There will be a meeting of
the JGP central committee at 9
p.m. today in the League.
* * *
BADMINTON - The co-recrea-
tional Badminton Club will meet at
8 p.m. today in Barbour Gym.

01+ 71L

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