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November 12, 1954 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-11-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

PAG!L LIGHT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY,,

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 12,154

Williams' Play Opens

TCB Fills
Classroom
Sace Need
By MITZI BOURGIN
"Temporary" classroom building,
known to most students as TCB, is
still in use seven years after its
construction.
Presently used by both speech
department and Army ROTC, the
building originally was constructed
to accomodate the general over-
flow of studentshreturning from
World War II.
Located behind the Dental
Building and North Hall, the
structure provides working space
for the speech department's set
construction and classes.
Constructed in 1947
The "temporary" building, ori-
ginally two government warehous-
es placed side by side, was con-
structed in 1947 with funds from
the Federal Works Agency. FWA
was helping institutions meet
emergency student housing as well
as class space.
Adequate exits have been pro-
vided in this timber structure to
enable quick evacuation of occu-
pants in case of fire. A plant of-
ficial observed that, "It is no more
hazardous than many other build-
ings on campus."
"Only Temporary"
"The important thing to con-
sider is that it is only a temporary
classroom building and will be re-
placed as soon as possible," the
official said.
He added "no definite date can
be set because of the already num-
erous projects being carried on by
the University although plans are
being studied for an addition to
the dental school which would re-
quire its removal."
The University did not have to
use as many temporary structures
is some schools. Government ware-
houses were not used for dormi-
tories here as they were elsewhere.

PRINTER'S INK:
Stewarts Like Newspaper Business.

Drama Concerns Emotions,
Not Ideas-Playwright Rice

-Daily-John Hirtzel

In the picture, left to right, are
Ruth Livingston, former Univer-
sity student, Howard Green, '57,
and Marjorie Austin, '56, who are
appearing in the Civic Theater's
current production of Tennessee
Williams' "Summer and Smoke."
In addition to Green and Miss
Austin, Lloyd Newman. '56, has a
supporting role. Bob Schultz, '58,
is helping with set building and
carpentry.
The play opened last night and
will rum through Saturday at Ly-
dia Mendelssohn Theatre.
Tickets, priced at $1.50, are
available at the Lydia Mendels-
sohn box office in the League.
Ann Arbor Civic Theater is an

organization of students, graduates
and residents of Ann Arbor and
nearby communities.
Ted Heusel, former University
student and Theater director, said
the Civic Theater is a self-sup-
porting stage company and not di-
rectly connected with the Univer-
sity. University and the theater,
added Heusel, cooperate on such
matters as use of the Lydia Men-
delssohn Theatre and exchange of
props.
He said all actors in the com-
pany are amateurs. Tryouts for
both actors and stage crew take
place a month and a half before
each play opens.
Bolet To Play
Haydn, Liszt

By DEBRA DURSCHLAG
and MICHAEL BRAUN j
Sometimes in the midst of a
particularly hectic day of teach-
ing, Prof. Kenneth Stewart of the
journalism department wishes par-
adoxically for the tranquility of a
newspaper city room.
"The impression the average
person gets of a newspaper office
is mor
is erroneous" he says. "Actually
sometimes it is more orderly than
a question filled classroom." His
wife Evelyn, newspaper and mag-
azine writer who is now editor at
the Institute for Social Research
center, tends to agree.
However, even though there is
no way of removing the last traces
of printers ink from their blood,
the Stewarts who have been in the
newspaper business for most of
their lives are happiest, though
sometimes harried, at the Univer-
sity.
Varied Stories
In their careers as journalists
they have fixed their byline to
stories ranging from the state of
the nation to the sociological side
of the Lindbergh kidnapping.
Most of their actual newspaper
work was done during the thirties
in New York. Describing their
marriage in 1931 Walter Winchell
wrote in his column; "Hurld Trib
scribe and the World Telly's best,
femme reporter will be sealed by1
Christmas."
The thirties were the times of
economic depression particularly
in the newspaper profession. Al-
though both Stewarts had well
paying jobs they joined with Hey-
wood Broun of the World Tele-
gram in the founding of the News-
paper Guild.
Broun and Steffens
Broun and Lincoln Steffens are
described by the Stewarts as "the
two greatest people we had ever
known." With Broun they stood on
picket lines and fought for better
conditions and higher wages for
journalists.
Although -he has since devoted
his life to teaching Stewart is still
a charter member of the Guild.
After the Guild had become
firmly established he worked on
the Literary Digest as national
news editor and also taught part
time at Columbia.
A full time teaching job follow-
ed at California's Stanford Uni-
versity but in 1937 the urge to
write called him back to New
York and the Sunday desk of the
New York Times where he worked
on the magazine and special sec-
tions.
"In 1940," Stewart now remem-
bers, "everyone at the Times was
excited over a newspaper called
PM, which would print news that
other newspapers couldn't hand-
dle."
"Our old friend George Lyon of
the World-Telegram was to be
managing editor so I decided to
apply for a position." When he
went for an interview he was told
he was "too much the Times
type," but that PM needed techni-
cians as well as "screwballs."
Stewart laughs over this today
because he had considered himself
the kind of screwball that PM
wanted.
Tried to Cover News
PM tried to cover news that
would be of particular interest to
people in the working class. Al-
though they covered this field well
'their readership was mainly intel-
lectual," Stewart, recalls.
Mrs. Stewart obtained a job on
PM and was assigned to cover
Eleanor Roosevelt's press confer-
ences to which the first lady would
only admit women.

The drama does not "shape
ideas or social theories," according
to noted playwright and visiting
lecturer Elmer Rice.
Rice, speaking yseterday on
"Drama as a Social Force," said
that "dramatists are not thinkers.
They deal primarily with emotions
and not ideas."
Commenting on the flexibility of
the theater, Rice said that the
theater "takes the form of the
vessel into which it is poured."
"You can't transplant theater
from one country to another as an
art," Rice said. He elaborated by
recalling experiences in foreign
theaters where the drama serves
as a "reflection of the society."
"It's almost impossible for a
Westerner to understand the
meaning and implications of Chi-
nese life." And hence, "they can-
not understand the Chinese drama
either," Rice said. He described
the Chinese theater as a place
where "people are coming and go-
Flash Cards
Block 'M' members are request-
ed to sit in their own seats at the
football game on Saturday.
In order to- make this perform-
ance the best yet, members are
urged to remember to line up di-
rectly behind the person in front
of them.

ing," mothers are coddling 'cry-
ing children," and there are "arias"
every so often.
"Rice explained that Russian
theaters are supported by the gov-
ernment. One theater he described
as employing "about 400 work-
ers," including cooks, actors, and
stagehands. "But, of course, there
is complete censorship in the Rus-
sian theater, as in all totalitarian
states," Rice said.
When asked about the American
theater in a question-and-answer
period following the lecture, Rice
chided the "richest country in the
world" for being "unable to raise
a few million dollars to support
a theater."
"People are not interested in
whether a play is good or bad.
They want to know whether it's a
hit," Rice said. He cited "as-
sembly line" movies and "TV
which people think is great" as
competitive forces which the thea-
ter must overcome.

4
N

-Daily-Dean Morton
THE STEWARTS AND FRIEND
... During a hectic class thoughts of a quiet city room

Try FOLLETT'S F
USED BOOP
at
BARGAIN PRICI

:irst
{S

Jorge Bolet, noted Cuban pian-
ist, will perform at 8:30 p.m. Mon-
ES day in Hill Auditorium.
The first half of the program will
include Haydn's "Andante Con
Variazioni," Beethoven's "Sonata
in E-flat (Les Adieux)" and Liszt's
"Sonata in B minor."
Bolet will conclude the program
with four scherzos by Chopin.
®NYLON BIT

I

Ii

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

When the war broke out Stew-
art.received a job with the Office
of War Information in Washing-F
ton. He was also awarded a Nie-l
man fellowship at Harvard and
managed to write a book "News
Is What We Make It."
When he returned to PM he
realized it had not been the pa-
per that many people had hoped
for. While there was no one group
controlling the paper there was a
constant battle between various
factions on the paper as to edi-
torial policy.
Opinionated Staff
The high quality of the news-
paper and the adamant viewpoint
of the youthful staff led one pun-
dit to refer to staff members as
"those young fogeys."
A year before PM folded the
Stewarts left the staff and he
obtained a full time teaching job
at N.Y.U. When questioned as to
the reason for PM's demise Stew-
art thinks a moment and says,
"there were many reasons and
many surveys made of these rea-
sons. I frankly don't think anyone
knows one .definite reason."
This attitude of not jumping to
hasty conclusions characterizes
the Stewarts particularly where
the question of the state of the
press is concerned. "There are
just too many factors to be tak-
en into consideration," he adds.
Stewart remarks that "these are
the type of questions that the peo-
ple at the Institute where Evelyn
works spend days and weeks try-
ing to find out."
Their newly acquired rambling
white house with two porches over-
looking the Huron River now oc-

cupies most of their spare time
-the activities of their two teen-
agers and collie providing an inter-
lude between the clamor of city,
room and class room.

Ii

(Continued from Page 4)
on "Some Recent Developments in
Interpolation" at 3:00 p.m. in Room
3017 Angell Hall, Fri., Nov. 12. Refresh-
ments.
Psychology Club. Meeting Fri., Nov.
12, at 3:15 p.m. in Room 2429 Mason,
to discuss Convention plans.
Lutheran Student Married Group-
Fri., 8:00 p.m. All couples are invited
to come to the Center, corner of Hill
St. and Forest Ave.
Acolytes will hear Prof. Edward L.
Walker of the Psychology Department
speak on "Some Philosophical Prob-
lems of Psychology" at 8:00 p.m., Fri.,
Nov. 12, in the East Conference Room
of the Rackham Building.
Coning Events
Wesleyan Guild. Sat., Nov. 13. Bar-
becue with Michigan State after the
game. It will cost 75c.
Dunker's Hour at the Newman Club
Sat., Nov. 13 immediately following the
Michigan-MSC football game. All New-
man Club members and their f 'z ads
invited.
Hillel: Open House Sat. after the
football game.
Episcopal Student Foundation. Cider
and doughnuts after the game Sat., at
Canterbury House. Canterbury Club
hayride and food roast Sat., Nov. 13.
Meet at Canterbury House at 7:15 p.m.

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Members of V.F.W. and their guests
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