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November 12, 1954 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-11-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE MIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1954

PAGE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 12. 195(

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ROULETTE, DICE, CARDS:
ISA To Present Monte Carlo Ball

HILLEL BRUNCH

Laboratory Helps Students Learn
18 Languages More Efficiently
By RUTH WEISS' T^

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50c Members
75c Non-Members

SUNDAY, NOV.
10:45 A.M.

21

Round and roundthe wheel of
fortune will turn at thc Monte Car-
lo Ball to be held from 9:15 p.m. to
midnight, Saturday, Nov. 20, in
the Union Ballroom.
Each semester the International
Student's Association sponsors a
dance to raise funds for the For-
eign Students Emergency Fund.
This money is used to help foreign
students with financial, medical,
and educational problems.
An atmosphere of Monte Carlo
gambling houses will be recreated
at the dance by roulette wheels

and dice and card games operated
by women in foreign costumes.
Paper Money Provided
Gamblers will use paper money,
and novelty prizes will be given to
winners of a certain number of
chips.
Earl Pearson and his Orchestra
will play for the semi-formal dance
to which foreign students are urged,
by ISA officers, to wear their na-
tive costumes.'
The dance is an all-campus
event. Rasheed Muriby, general
chairman, has announced that all

University students, foreign or not,
may work on dance committees.
Decorations, programs, tickets
and floorshow committees are now
making plans for the dance and
"would welcome any volunteer
help," he said.
In previous years distinguished
royal guests, such as princes, prin-
cesses and dukes, students here,
appeared in full native regalia.
Tickets for the dance are priced
at $2 per couple and may be pur-
chased at the International Center
Offices in the Union or from ISA
officers.

Make reservations at Hillel by November 15th
every night from 7-10 P.M.

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-$
/1T
-
Only at Jacobson's can /
you save wardrobe
and gift-buying dollars # .
n ,these1sis.
S -1
and slip-rmatching .
petticoats! In six
beautiful holiday colors,
they're lavished
with pleats, embroidery.
and lace. Some -M
have zipper side closings,
some come in both
regular and tall lengths.
White, red, blue, A
pink with grey, black . f . %
or champagne. f r .
Slips, sizes 32 to 40.$
Petticoats, small,'
medium or large sizes. *
S PPECiAL UCAE
r: NYLON IRICOT LINGERIE
" FOR EARLY
NCHRISTMAS GIFT SHOPPERS
PETTICOATS

Buenas dias, Guten tag, Good
day, Bon jour!
Walk into the language labora-
tory in Mason Hall, pick out a rec-
ord, play it on the recorder, put
on the earphones and the student
is likely to' be greeted in any one
of 18 different languages: German,
Latin, Polish, Korean, Thai, Turk-
ish, Persian, Portuguese, Swedish,
Spanish, French, Chinese, Japan-
ese, Greek, English, Russian, Ar-
abic or Italian.
About six and a half years ago
Prof. Lawrence Kiddle, Prof.
Charles Staubach and Prof. Ernst
Pulgram, of the Romance Lan-
guage Department, planned the
laboratory project and obtained
permission to start it. They began
with six pieces of machinery. To-
day this number has increased to
100 pieces which are used for re-
cording and listening to records.
Laboratory Supervision
The laboratory is supervised by
Thomas Bradley, whose primary
interest is the electrical equipment.
He is assisted by Dennis Greene,
graduate student in the foreign
language department and William
Baird, graduate student in lingu-
istics.
The University was one of the
first to use this method of study
for foreign languages now adopted
by many other colleges. This in-
ter-departmental laboratory serves
all the language departments as
well as the English Language In-
stitute. It is administered by an
inter-departmental committee with
Prof. Otto Graf, of the German De-
partment, serving as chairman.
Students stuaying a roreign lan-
guage learn the language by hear-
ing it on records and repeating
and memorizing it. Recordings are
madeodf material supplementing
classroom work.
70 Listening Booths
The 70 listening booths are used
approximately 3,500 times a week
including repeat sessions. Teach-
ers often use it to review vocabu-
lary. Students planning trips to
foreign countries use it to acquaint
themselves with the language. A
section of the laboratory is re-
served from 9-11 p.m. every morn-
ing for foreign students studying
English.
All the recordings are made in
the laboratory by native speakers
and teachers.
An attempt is being made to
build up a library of recorded mas-
terpieces, plays and poetry.

l %:. .... . . . ..........::

I

-Daily-John Hirtzel
"LANGUAGE LAB"-Martha Kitter studies her German assign-
ment in the language laboratory in Mason Hall. The laboratory is
used an average of 3,500 times a week by language students to sup-
plement their classroom assignments.
Sailing Club Holds Regattas,
Constructs New Club House

By SUE RAUNHEIM
Eighteen miles from Ann Arbor
on Baseline Lake near Peach
Mountain, students are busily en-
grossed in building a new club
house.
-These students belong to the
Sailing Club which has been in ex-
istence since 1938.
The new clubhouse will consist.
of a prefabricated garage 20 by 22
feet long. At intervals between
sailing, members hammered bolts
and nails until the club house be-
gan to take shape..
Started by Architects
This co-educational club was
started by five architects in the na-
Michigan Blazers
Michigan blazers will be dis-
tributed from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m.
Monday in the second floor
lobby of the women's pool.

~TWO'PTZMER v
Princess Gardner

val architecture department be-
cause they wanted to promote in-
terest and activity in small boat
sailing. The experienced skippers.
taught beginners fundamentals of
handling a sailboat.
Since this club is financially in-
dependent of the University, every-
thing it owns has been bought or
made by members. This includes
eleven sailboats and one crashboat,
which is a boat that rescues other
boats in distress.
During the colder part of win-
ter, the club participates in ice-
boat races, instead of sailing. This
consists of racing iceboats which
resemble sleds with sails. These
boats sometimes go as fast as 60
to 70 miles-per-hour.
One member remarked there is
no greater feelingon an ice-cold
day, than to race across the lake,
with the wind blowing in your face.
Fishing Mishap
Commodore Thomas Banwell re-
calls an incident that occurred last
year.. While iceboating, the stu-
dents encountered men shack fish-
ing. This sport consists of building
a shack on the ice, building a fire
and then fishing through a hole in
the ice. One day, the crew sudden-
ly whizzed by a fisherman, com-
pletely demolishing his shack and
left him sitting on the ice dumb-
founded. Neither the crew nor the
fisherman could explain what had
happened.
Sailing Regatta
Each weekend, the club sched-
ules some sort of activity. Sunday,
November 7, the group entered the
eliminations of the Midwestern Col-
legiate Sailing Association Regatta.
Competing with Michigan were
Michigan State College, DePauw
and the University of Detroit. The
winner in this competition was
Michigan State. Last semester the
sailing club beat MSC by one-half
point.
There is an A and B division of
each race with each school having
a skipper and crew in the divi-
sions. The races are worked on a
round robin basis. Outstanding
skippers last year were Bob Al-
len, Jim Johns and Don McVitte.
Besides all this sailing, the group
manages to get in a bit of social-
izing too. Parties are planned after
races when people can ask ques-
tions or just sit and chat.
Awards Displayed
The club is proud of awards it
has received, now displayed in a
store window on East University.
Students may attend a club meet-
ing at 7:30 p.m. on Thursdays in
311 West Engineering Building,
"Purchase from Purchase"
during our
PRE-CH RISTMAS
CLEARANCE
SALE
Saturday and Monday Only
Purchase Camera Shop
1 116 S. University

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SLIPS

reverse it

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Two Colors...

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Party Favors
o And Programs
PERSONALIZED
|lGREETING CARDS n

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11

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