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November 11, 1954 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-11-11

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PACE SIX

TSB MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, NOVEMBERS 11, 1954

PAGE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 1954

U''BEST BLIND DATE':
Messinger Zest Underlies Busy Career
m~

By JANE HOWARD
Somewhere down the corridor of
Martha Copk a phone buzzed, and
a voice shouted "Dee! It's for you
again."
Dolores Messinger, '55E, set
down the paper dolls she'd been
cutting out for "her kids" in an
education project, and ran to an-
swer the call. It might have per-
tained to- any one of the imposing
list of activities she has accumu-
lated in a breathless campus ca-
reer.
Always A Gavel
"Without a gavel in her hand,"
one friend suggested, "Dee would
be lost." Presidential jobs have
headed Miss Messinger's activity
lists, beginning with a position
heading the freshman class in her
dormitory. The next year she was
elected Mosher Hall president.
Junior year brought her to the
top of Assembly Association, and
the distinction of being the cam-
pus' first third-year woman to fill
the job.
And now, although she terms this
year "an absolute rest," she's edu-
cation school class president.
Tapped Monday for Senior Soci-
ety honorary,d the husky-voiced
New Yorker has also kept busy
with sideline activities. She recalls
a job as Soph Cab floor show di-
rector and a major role in last
year's Junior Girls' Play, in addi-
tion to work in Hillel Foundation.
Likes to Make Noise
"Dee," as friends have nick-
named her, is the first to admit
she likes to make noise : partly be-
cause of her subdued high school
atmosphere and partly, she thinks,
because "I like to be around peo-
ple."
A deep interest in what she calls
"untapped fields with potential"
made the Assembly job of uniting
all 4,000 independent women a par-
ticular challenge. "Honestly," she
emphasized, "there's a place for
every single girl on .this campus,
and something for everybody to
do."
The Education School position
gives her another opportunity to
apply her own boundless enthusi-
asm. "Ed School's really bouncing
this year," she smiled. "We've got
several innovations including a
Student Information Service, an
all-school dance, a pamphlet pub-
lished to welcome new student
teachers"-and the list goes on.
Assembly Took Stand
Her work in both Assembly and
Education School has concentrat-
ed on increased publicity and rec-
ognition for the groups. "The big-
gest thing, In Assembly,"-she re-
called, "was getting it to take
definite stands on campus public
issues."

Daily-Dick Gaskill

"DEE" MESSINGER
... Enthusiasm Unlimited

Education has been Miss Mes-
singer's chosen field since the in-
fluence of a second grade teacher.
Currently she's not "sold" on pro-
gressive education. "It's a won-
derful system," she says, "but
not always practical. My kids,"
she added, "are going to get a
mixture of traditional and modern
education methods."
Politically, Dee is still "shopping
around-reading up and trying to
keep out of useless arguments."
Resumes Interests
This year, with more leisure time
of her own ("people are still ask-
ing me what I'm doing back on
campus!"), she's resumed strong
interests in sports, dramatics, so-
cial life and music.
Vague business interests have
also made her campus representa-
tive, this year, for a blanket con-
cern-"it's not that I really like
business so much, but that I've
been exposed to it all my life." Her
father is in the textile industry.
Lighting a cigarette ("my only
vice until I'm 21!"), she reached
for pictures of her family, center-
ing on an infant nephew, and
proudly claimed, "isn't he some-
thing?"
Current plans for Miss Messinger
include teaching until a master's
degree brings her into the admir-e
istrative realm. "I'm not always
going to be a woman of the world,
though," sheput in. "I'm planning
to settle down and break that

stereotype about old-maid school-
teachers."
And she wouldn't mind settling
down in Ann Arbor. For the New
York apartment-dweller, "Michi-
gan's been a real experience as
well as an education: it's the best
blind date I've ever had."
.Blatt To Lead
U' Symphony
Concert Today
With a family tree dating from
1890, the University Symphony Or-
chestra, conducted by Josef Blatt,
will present their annual fall con-
cert at 8:30 p.m. today in Hill Au-
ditorium.
The present Symphony's ances-
tors were the Chaquamegan Or-
chestra which flourished in the
1890's and the University Sympho-
ny, starting in 1904.
"In the early days, when high
school musicians weren't trained
as well as they are today, the Or-
chestra served as a composite
community orchestra," Dean Earl
V. Moore of the School of Music
commented.
Through the years, several
conductors have been on the po-
dium. Samuel Pearson Lockwood
was the first conductor, followed
by Prof. David Mattern, Dean
Moore, Prof. William D. Revellim,
Thor Johnson, Prof. Gilbert Ross
and Eric DeLamarter, assistant
conductor of the Chicago Sym-
phony.
After World War II, Wayne Dun-
lap assumed the conductorship, re-
maining until 1953 when Josef
Blatt took over.
Prof. Joseph Brinkman, head of
the music school's piano depart-
ment will be featured soloist at
today's concert, playing Beetho-
ven's Piano Concerto No. 5.
The program, open to the public
without charge, will also include
Wagner's "Overture to Tannhaus-
er," Prokofieff's "Classical Sym-
phony" and Dukas' "Sorcerer's
Apprentice."

Unemployed
Figures Drop
Unemployment in Michigan is
rapidly dwindling, Rex. H. Not-
tingham of the Michigan Employ-
ment Security Commission said
yesterday.
Only a month ago, employment
around the state was at the lowest
level in the past 26 months, he con-
tinued. At present, there are 195,-
000 unemployed workers in the De-
troit area, while total unemploy-
ment for the state is about 287,000.
2,210,000 Now Working
With 2,110,000 employed workers
in Michigan about a month ago,
probably 100,000 more workers
are back on the job now. Accord-
ing to Nottingham, total state em-
ployment in a month may be 2,-
260,000.
Ann Arbor area unemployment
is also going down rapidly, he indi-
cated. Only 500 workers here are
now drawing unemployment com-
pensation, while in late September
5,000 men were unemployed in
Washtenaw county. Nearly 1,000
of these were in Ann Arbor. Labor
force in the county now is approxi-
mately 65,000.
Defense Contracts Filled
No more workers in Michigan
will be thrown out of work because
of defense department contract cut-
backs, Nottingham commented.
Since most of these contracts are
about filled, civilian consumption
contracts are beginning, enabling
more workers to go back to work.
Many of them had previously
been out of work because of the de-
fense cutbacks. Not much defense
contract work is being done in Ann
Arbor now, Nottingham said.
Across the country, the highest
amount of unemployment occurred
in August, he pointed out. With
many workers now trooping back
to their jobs after layoffs, employ-
ment conditions for the near future
look favorable.
Baha'i To Fete
Leader's Birth
The birthday of Baha'u'llah,
founder of the Baha'i World Faith
Movement, will be celebrated to-
day and tomorrow by the campus
chapter.
The campus Baha'i Youth Group
will hold a meeting at 8:30 p.m. to-
day in the League, the program
being centered around the theme
of the founder's birth.
Born in 1817 in territory now
known as Iran, Baha'u'llah pro-
claimed in 1863 that his mission as
the Promised One of all religions
was to inaugurate a new and di-
vine civilization of world unity and
peace.
Members of the inter-racial inter-
religious group work together to
put into effect their leader's state-
ment, "The earth is but one coun-
try, and mankind its citizens."
KISSING ROOM
MEXICO CITY (P)--The gov.
ernment said yesterday it will
build a "kissing room" at the
airport for sweethearts' fare-
wells.
Spectators have been making
fun of some lengthy partings at
the airport, so there will be a
separate waiting room for
couples who expect to need pri-
vacy.

Experiments
Going prefabricated houses one
better, the architecture college has
a building that can be expanded
indefinitely or dismanteled and
put together in an entirely differ-
ent way.
Built primarily of a newly de-
veloped steel frame-work called
unistrut, the building under con-
struction in the college's court-
yard is an experiment itself and
will provide space for future archi-
tectural experiments.
It uses the unistrut space-frame
method of construction which was
compared to "an over-grown me-
canno set" by Prof. C. Theodore
Larson of the architecture col-
lege. Architecture and engineer-
ing college experimenters develop-
ed it in a series of tests over the
past five years.
Need for more space in the
architecture college gave impetus
to the space frame method's first
practical use.
According to plant department
estimates the building would cost
$70,000 if built by traditional
methods. When final figures are
in, Prof. Larson predicts that they
will fall well below this figure.
Student Labor
Under a special agreement with
the Ann Arbor carpenters union,
students are doing most of the
construction and getting academic
credit as well as an hourly wage
for their work.
Begun in 1949, the unistrut ex-
periment was originally designed
to develop a method of low cost
school construction. University
alumnus Charles W. Attwood, Pre-
sident of the Unistrut Corpora-
tion of Wayne, sponsored the pro-
ject as an attempt to alleviate
the problem of overcrowded
schools.
Unistrut had previously been
used in such structures as the
University heatingtunnels, but
a whole building based on the
simple structural unit was a new
idea.I
Simple Tools Used
Among the chief advantage of
such a building is that it can be
assembled or taken apart, sec-
tions added or removed with only
a few simple tools, Prof. Larson
explained.
Walls, windows, floors and ceil-
ings are made of panels pre-cut
to size and fitted into place.
When research had advanced to
the point where large scale appli-
cation was possible, Attwood's
company agreed to underwrite the
project, and the new building was
begun during the summer.
It will house offices of eight
faculty members involved in re-
search projects.
Forming a protected area in
which experimental structures
}S

Bull din
s~
Architecture IfT
Based on 'U'

Tests

Unistrut

4.

EXPERIMENTAL ARCHITECTURE SET AGAINST TRADITIONAL BACKGROUND

i
.
a
d

connected with these projects can
be built, is an overhanging roof
as large as the roof of the build-
ing.
An experiment in itself, the roof
if successful could be used in
school construction, Prof. Larson
said. The protected courtyard
which it creates makes outdoor
activities possible in rainy wea-
ther.
Standard built-up roofing cov-
ers the main building, while in
the overhanging top strips of dif-
ferent types of experimental roof-
ing were used.
Newly-developed plastics are
the key to a number of smaller ex-
periments for which materials
have been contributed by com-
panies that want their products
tested.
Plastic sky-lighting, six kinds
of roofing and three different
types of roof insulation are being
incorporated into the building.
Plastic Sky-lights
Three dome-shaped plastic sky-
lights ,each installed by a slightly
different method, will let day-
light in through the top, while
a translucent ceiling made of plas-
tic film allows light to seep
through to the rooms below.
Florescent lamps, hidden behind
the plastic ceiling provide light
at night, giving the ceiling a con-
tinuous glow coming from an un-
seen source.
When the plastic film gets
dirty, Prof. Larson suggests throw-
ing it away, since buying a new
ceiling would be cheaper than
cleaning the old one.
Not only does the building's ceil-
ing glow but transulent plastic tri-
angles make the upper part glow
from without.

71

STUDENT APPLIES TAR TO EDGE OF PLASTIC SKYLIGHT
DAILY PHOTO FEATURE
Story by PHYLLIS LJPSKY
Pictures by DICK GASKILL

ETHICS:G k
BYGOD OR MAN

Carbon-toned for
Casual Elegance
TWEED CHESTER COAT

1

s3995

WHEN IT'S
Nick(
T IME
Take it easy
by using our
New Drop Off-Pick Up Service
for your LAUNDRY
Just bring it in before the game Saturday. We'll
have it ready for you to pick up when we open
Monday morning.
Other Features of Our One-Stop Service
* FINISHED SHIRTS --48 Hour Service
Quality workmanship by Varsity Laundry, Spark-

y f,,

Rich, nubby, pure
wool tweed. Light,
weight lined with
quilted air-ell
insulation by
Jen-Cel- Lite for
added warmth. 36.4

FINAL BOLT IS APPLIED TO FIRST FLOOR CEILING

STUDENT WORKERS SLIDE WINDOW INTO PLACE

19

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