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October 31, 1954 - Image 8

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-10-31

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

AGO ETGITT' .

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1954

'?AG1!~ ETOET TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY, OCTOBER 31. 1954

"f

KEEPING AN EYE ON
Your Student Legislature

Illusic

Students

Lack

Needed

Space

By MURRY FRYMER
FIFTEEN JAPANESE students
will visit the campus Nov. 13-17 as
part of their trans-continental
tour of A ierican colleges.-
SL's International - committee
will take part guiding the students
around to classes and extracurric-
ular activities.
* * *
INVITATIONS are going out to
resident, houses, fraternities, and
sororities to attend SL meetings,
and become better acquainted with
the organization. Plans call for
having two houses attend each
week.
* * *
THE ANTI-DISCRIMINATION
Board is interested in hearing of
any cases of possible discrimina-
tion which any individual or or-
ganization has experienced.
The Board, made up of two SL
members, three otner students,
two city businessmen, and one
member of the administration, has
been set up' for the purpose of
hearing and investigating any
cases brought to it.
Diana Hewitt,, '56, chairman of
the committee, has stressed that
the committee "is not set up to
COLLEGE ROUND-UP:

supplant any other organizations
working in the field, but to bring
together all forces that deal with
the problem."
* * s
SL VOTING: Motion: SL recom-
mends to the Committee on Stu-
dent Affairs that the minimum
number of students required for
an organization to be officially
recognized by the University shall
be lowered (from 30) to 20. (by
Hillman).
Vote: 23 For, 4 Against, 1 Ab-
staining.
Motion: To "indefinitely" table
a motion proposing severance pay
for dismissed University instruc-
tors, Prof. Mark Nickerson, and
H. Chandler Davis. (by Donald-
son).
For: Bleha, Kauffman, Cowan,
Donaldson, Butman, Hoffman,
Germany, Berliner, Cummins,
Beck, Simon, Adams, Yates, Har-
ris, Beebe.
Against: .Leacock, Uchitelle,
Levy, Bryan, Hillman, Gilman,
Rossner, Kahn, Boggan, Klame,
Cook, Dormont, Hewitt.
Abstain: Netzer, Petricoff.
Vote: 15 For, 13 Against, 2 Ab-
stain.

(EDITOR'S NOTE: The following article is an interpretive study of con-
ditions and facilities in the School of Music.)
Overcrowded, inadequate facilities in the School of Music force
students to practice in lavatories and basement stairwells.
Four or five teachers crowd into office space suitable for one
person. Even then, their office space is not their own..As soon as
teachers leave, students take over for rehearsal sessions.
"Everything is inadequate because of the size of enrollment,"
Dean Earl V. Moore of the School of Music commented.
Current enrollment totals 557 but Music School facilities are
keyed to only half that amount.
Doors Kept Open Until 10 p.m.
More than
Only 75 of the needed 200 practice rooms are available. To ac-
commodate demand for practice rooms, rehearsal halls and office
quarters, the School of Music is forced to keep doors open until 10
p.m. each night and during weekend afternoons.
More than 150 concerts are scheduled by the music school
throughout the year. Each concert should have at least one rehearsal,
but space is not available for these rehearsals,
When concerts finally take-

PRACTICING IN LAVATORIES PROHIBITED IN HARRIS HALL . .. BUT IN BURTON TOWER .. .

place, they are distributed in
Rackham Amphitheatre, L y d i a
Mendelssohn Theatre, Hill Audi-
torium and Angell Hall Auditor-
iums.
Lack of Space Limits Enrollment
Lack of space has caused the
School of Music to limit enroll-
ment to approximately 500 stu-
dents. The remaining 18,250 non-
musical students cannot elect mu-
sic courses are part of their edu-
cation.
The School of Music estimates
at least 500 students outside of
the School must be turned down
each semester because of lack of
teaching space and practice fa-
cilities.
All qualified Michigan residents
are admitted, but many equally
qualified out-of-state applicants
cannot be admitted. Music school
Secretary James Wallace noted,

Coeds Spark MSC Cheers,
Two Alligators To Visit OSU

By SHXIRLEY CROOG
While Michigan was celebrating
the 50th anniversary of the Union,
New York University dedicated its
new Student Center yesterday aft-
ernoon.
The building, gift of Frank Jay
Gould, American financier and
graduate of NYU's engineering
school, will serve over two thou-
sand men on the University
Heights campus in Bronx.
* * *
Michigan State has gone pro-
gressive! The latest addition to the
football field is six coed cheer-
leaders. The Spartans now feel
"they really lit a spark" in an ef-
fort to curp apparent apathy in
the cheering section. They feel
coeds will "lead them in the right
direction behind the team."
s * s
If anyone is looking for a real,
live Pogo they might try Ohio
Talks Planned
On Tfax Law
Changes caused by a revision of
Federal income, estate and gift
tax laws will be discussed at an
Internal Revenue Institute, accord-
ing to Prof. Charles W. Joiner,
chairman of the Institute commit-
tee.
Sponsored by the University's
law school, the Institute will be
conducted at the Rackham Bldg.
tomorrow and Tuesday.
Prof. Joiner pointed out that ev-
ery lawyer's practice is affected by
this revision, the most extensive
since 1913.
Prof. L. Hart Wright of the law
school will talk on changes relat-
ing to gross income. and Prof.
Paul G. Kauper of the law school
will discuss decedents, estates aid
trusts.
Prof. Sellars Set
To Give Lecture
Prof. Emeritus Roy W. Sellars
of the philosophy department will
deliver a lecture on "The Objective
Intent of Valuation" at 8 p.m. Mon-
day in the East Conference Room,
Rackham Bldg.
Prof. Sellers, who retired from
the University teaching staff in
1950, is a distinguished American
philosopher. He is well known for
his many, contributions to philo-
sophical journals.
Since he began his University
teaching career in 1905, Prof. Sel-
lars has been the recipient of many
honors. In 1923 he was elected pres-
ident of the American Philosophi-
cal Association.

State's campus . . . there's a fel-
low there who's bringing his two
20 inch alligators to campus for a
weekend. He may have to pay
rent for the two strangers at his
fraternity house. However, there'll
be no food problem, for the "'ga-
tors have no taste buds . . . and
when they start biting they don't
care what it is."
* * s
At Cornell, a proposal was made
to set up a committee to "investi-
gate and evaluate" bias clauses in
social organizations on campus.
The president of the Interfrater-
nity Council indicated, although
there were still 10 fraternities with
discrimination clauses, a recent
poll indicated that all fraternities
on campus we2-e in favor of remov-
al of national restrictions.
However, any legislation to be
taken on the bias clause will rest
with Cornell IFC; the proposed
committee will act only as an ad-
visory group.
Sleeping through classes isn't
the only time a person can catch
up on his sleep and attend a lec-
ture at the same time.
According to the Detroit Varsity
News, a Nebraska college student
recently graduated from college
just by sleeping: His technique:
sleep-learning. Since he was flunk-
ing, he decided to read his lecture
notes into a tape recorder and
play it back when sleeping. .
A few weeks later, his effort
was successful. His friends stopped
laughing at him when he "started
tossing around five-syllable words,
formulas, dates and complete pas-
sages from Shakespeare."
* * *
The University of California and
Indonesia are book-exchanging.
California is campaigning to send
technical text books either direct-
ly to Indonesia or to a mimeo-
graphing center set up by World
University Service.
In return, Indonesian students
are sending books concerning sev-
eral aspects of their culture to the
University. California students feel
the book exchange is one way to
help Indonesia become "independ-
ent and self-sustaining" through
education.
The University of Detroit plans
to open a television workshop in
mid-November. The broadcasting
will be on a closed campus cir-
cuit, run completely by students,
except for an electronics engineer
and studio supervisor.
Closed broadcasting will train
camera and floor crews for actual
channel broadcasting, which they
hope will begin in April. WTVS
will-broadcast on Channel 56 over
a 40 mile radius.

FACULTY MEMBERS CROWD INTO SMALL OFFICE CLARINETEST REHEARSES IN JANITOR'S OFFICE

NO ROOM TO PHONE

"We usually turn down at least
150 well-qualified applicants ev-
ery semester."
Thirteen scattered buildings in
the campus area provide needed
space for School of Music activ-
ities. "Even then," Dean Moore
said, "we are not meeting the de-
mands and needs of the student
body."
Space for Teaching
Space in four of the 13 buildings
is rented for teaching and prac-
tice rooms. Facilities are used in
Ann Arbor High School, basement
rooms in the Congregational and
Baptist Churches and Harris Hall,
former student center of the Epis-
copal Church.
Lane Hall,Mason Hall1and the
General Library are also utilized
at various times for practicing,
teaching,urehearsing or for listen-
ing periods.
"Needs of the School of Music
have been recognized by the Board
of Regents for many years," ean
Moore noted. "Even 10 or 15 years
ago," he continued, "there was al-
ways a sentence or two discussing
inadequate conditions in our
School, in the book of capital out-
lay sent to the State Legislature."
Regents Make Report
Two years ago, the Regents, in
cooperation with the University,
drew up a report for the State
Legislature, discussing prepara-
tions and appropriations for con-
struction.
Proposed School of Music build-
ings will be built on North Cam-
pus at an estimated cost of $4,-
000,000. When completed, areas
would be provided for practice
studios, rehearsal rooms, teach-
ing units, a library, listening
rooms, music stacks, a band shell,
administration space and parking
areas.
"We could accommodate 800
full-time students," Dean Moore
said, "releasing space now on this
campus to accommodate those en-
rolled in other schools of the Uni-
versity who wanted to take mu-
sic courses."
Architects drew up sketches for
for the buildings and plans were
received by the Regents in May,
1952. The plans are still under
consideration.
School of Music History
Under the name of the Ann Ar-
bor School of Music, today's School
of Music was started in 1881 in
a building located at the corner
of N. State and E. Huron.
In 1891, the school was taken
over and reorganized by the Uni-
versity Musical Society. A site-was
acquired and a building was erect-
ed in 1893 on Maynard, through
funds subscribed largely by local
citizens.
The same building now serves
as headquarters for the School of
Music, but provides only a small
portion of facilities required for
currently restricted enrollment.
University Affiliation
When the School of Music be-
came affiliated with the Univer-
sity in 1929, title to all its proper-
ty passed to the Board of Regents.
Through the years, the School
grew continually. Until enrollment
was recently restricted, the School
was able to give musical education
to all those who wanted it.
Enrollment in fall, 1939, was
267. Enrollment had expanded to
587 by 1947. Because of severe
has been necessary since then to
handicaps imposed on students, it
restrict enrollment to approxi-
mately 500.
"Present crowded conditions are
detrimental to continuing high
standards in collegiate musical ed-
ucation," Dean Moore said. "At
the present time, it is impossible
for the School of Music to serve
the musical needs of the entire
University community.

DAILY
PHOTO
FFATI FRE

r

4

i

PIANO STUDIOS MUST ACCOMMODATE TWICE NOMAL NUMBER

HIDE-AWAY UNDER
THE STAIRS

HARRIS HALL BACKSTAGE

i

w

XYLOPHONE PLAYER PRACTICES IN HARRIS HALL LOCKER ROOM

I

L ' . V .. ; . .. .. ... 5. . fi...' . < ::.: :' ". 1p.. i.

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