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October 30, 1954 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-10-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE FOT1R

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATUTRDlAY. OCTOBER 301954wn

T cAx . vxv"L-A a Liv.i WA.VJ JiV it V, 1s7i7'#

ATOMIC ENERGY PROJECT:
Work Progresses on New
By JIM DYGERT
As workmen on the new North 1
Campus add a little more each
day to the Phoenix Memorial Lab-.
orty, the first step in the $7,-
500,000 Phoenix project ap-
proaches completion.z
Started last spring and expected
to be ready by next July, the
unique laboratory will be used for
research in peacetime uses ofr
atomic energy.
Being constructed on a budget
of $1,500,000, the building will fea-
ture two specially constructed
areas called "caves" for research
involving the use of highly radio-k
active materials.

Phoenix Lab

Built Underground
The "caves" are being built un-
derground with solid concrete
walls of extra thickness. Win-
dows will permit work inside the
caves to be controlled from with-
out the walls.
Modeled after the Oak Ridge
atomic laboratory and the Atomic
Eiergy Commission's Argonne Na-
tional Laboratories in Chicago,
the Phoenix Laboratory will have
the only two such "caves" on a
-college campus.
A small library and reading
room on radioactivity and radio-
active materials will also be in-
cluded in the building.
Three Labs Planned
Although the Phoenix Labora-
tory is the only lab among the 10
University buildings now under
construction, three other labora-
tories have found their way onto
blueprints and will be started
soon.
Like the Phoenix Laboratory,
all three' will be built on the
North Campus. One, the Reactor
building, will be constructed ad-
joining the Phoenix Laboratory.
Plans for the Reactor Building,
to be financed by a $1,000,000
grant from the Ford Motor Com-
pany Fund, are almost finished,
according to University Vice-Pres-
ident Wilbur K. Pierpont. Con-
struction is expected to begin. in
January and to take approximate-
ly a year. '
The building will house the
largest nuclear research reactor
in the United States besides those
operated by the AEC. Through ex-
pansion of the University's re-
search programs in medicine, bi-
ology, chemistry, engineering and
physics, the Reactor will enable
I RENT-A-CAR

Hemingway
'Deserved'
Nobel Prize
Calling it "high time," Prof. Al-
lan Seager concurred with Eng-
lish Department faculty members
contacted that Ernest Hemingway
deservedly won the 1954 Nobel
Prize for Literature.
While William Faulkner (who
won the Prize in 1952) is a larger
figure, Prof. Seager said, he is
not a larger public figure, for
Hemingway is the "most influential
American writer of this century--
more people have imitated him."
Though saying that he thought
the prize was deserved, Prof. Nor-
man Nelson said that he regretted
Hemingway's having "to buckle to
the symbolism fashion before he
was allowed to receive the Prize,
for "The Old Man and the Sea"
is far from being the best he can
do."
Late Recognition
Prof. Arthur Carr said he wished
that the 55-year-old writer had re.
ceived the award "when his liter-
ature was at his greatest."
He added that the Nobel Com-
mittee always seems to give its
recognition late, but that it does
nonetheless serve a useful func-
tion for writers.
International Meaning
Also calling Hemingway one of
the most important literary figures
of the 20th century, Prof. Joe Davis
added that Hemingway "more than
any other has been a writer of the
international scene, and his fic-
tion has a kind of world scope
and world meaning."
The recognition, Prof. Davis add-
ed, serves to underscore the signi-
ficance of this kind of international-
ism in modern fiction.
The Pulitzer Prize for fiction was
awarded to Hemingway last year
for his "Old Man and the Sea."
His more famous works include,
"A Farewell to Arms," "The Sun
Also Rises," and "For Whom the
Bells Toll."

PHOENIX MEMORIAL-The N
Phoenix Project to develop peace
the Phoenix program to integrate
research here instead of sending
work to outside centers such as
Oak Ridge..
Uranium From AEC}
Necessary supplies for the Re-
actor will be purchased by the
Phoenix Project office, except for
uranium, which is to be furnished
by the AEC.
A second laboratory on North
Campus blueprints is a new Auto-
motive Engineering Laboratory to
replace the old auto lab near West
Engineering Bldg.
The new auto lab, larger than
the old lab, will be started in No-
vember on funds appropriated by
the State Legislature and is ex-
pected to be finished by next De-
cember.
It will have 18 test cells, includ-
ing some for jet engine research,
and some for fuel research.
Institute Lists,
NATew Heads
Newbern Smith and Clair M.
Beighley have been appointed
heads of Engineering Research In-
stitute programs.
The project, set up last year, is
aimed at developing methods for
gathering c o m b a t intelligence
through radar, television and oth-'
er mechanical means.
Smith, named supervisor of
Project Michigan, received his
doctorate in physics at the Uni-
versity of Pennsylvania in 1935.
Before joining the institute in
February, Smith was chief of the
central radio propagation labora-
tory in the Bureau of Standards.
Beighley will head the Rocket
Propulsion Laboratory, which is
concentrating on studies of rocket
fuels, combustion and ignition.
He earned his doctorate in me-
chanical engineering in 1952 from
Purdue.

-Daily-John Hirtzel
orth Campus lab is part of the
time rises for atomic energy.
Plans call for larger shop areas,
offices and research labs than are
now available.
The old auto lab will be torn
down as soon as the North Cam-
pus project is completed and the
equipment moved.
Another laboratory scheduled
for construction, in March, is an
Aeronautical Engineering Labora-
tory on North Campus.
Flu Vaccine
To Be Given
Flu protection shots are avail-
able to all students from 8 to 11:45
a.m. and 1 to 4:45 p.m. Monday
through Friday next week and
from 8 to 11:45 a.m. Saturday, Nov.
6, at Health Service.
Regular flu protection will be
available, Health Service officials
have announced, but the proposed
controlled study of the flu vaccine
will not be carried out this year.
Every student who comes to Health
Service for flu shots will receive
the protective vaccine.
Students desiring innoculations
are requested by Health Service
officials to bring identification
cards and to enter by the North
(Washington St.) door.
Tickets
A number of 50-yard line seats
for today's game will go on sale
at 9:45 a.m. today at the Union,
according to Mark Gallon '56,
s t u d e n t services committee
chairman.
Tickets may also be brought
in for resale through the Union
ticket resale service, Gallon
said. No student tickets can be
resold, and regular prices are
charged for those on sale.

(Continued from Page 2)
4:00 p.m., including Sat. and Sun.,
with an extra showing on Wed. at
12:30.
The Newman Club will sponsor a
Halloween Party for all Catholic stu-
dents and their friends Sat., Oct. 30 at
the Father Richard Center. Don Ken-
ny and his orchestra will provide mu-
sic for dancing from 8:30 until 12:00
p.m. Refreshments will be served.
Episcopal Student Foundation. Cider
and doughnuts after the game on Sat.,
at Canterbury House. All students in-
vited.
Wesleyan Guild-Sat., Big Halloween
party in lounge at 8:00 p.m. No cos-
tumes.
Westminster S t u d e n t Fellowship
Halloween party, with square dancing
called by Jerry Moon, games and re-
freshments at 8:00 p.m. tonight at the
Presbyterian student center. Come in
costume or not. W.S.F. picnic after the
game, sponsored by the freshmen.
Meet at the Presbyterian church at
5:30 p.m.
German Club: The Deutscher Verein
is holding a Halloween Supper-party
for members and their guests tonight
at the home of its president, 3270
Cherry Hill, Dixboro. All those who
need transportation will meet at 5:45
p.m. in front of Tappan Hall. There
will be a charge of 25c to help defray
the cost of the dinner.
"AutumnLeaves" will be the theme
of the dance at Jordan Hall this eve-
ning. Dancing will be from 8-12 and
admission is $1.50 a couple.
Lutheran Student Association. Come
to the "Hard Times" party, Sat. at
8:15 p.m. at the Center. Dress in
keeping with the nature of the party
as an entrance requirement. Corner
of Hill St. and Forest Ave.
Coming Events
First Baptist Church. Sun., Oct. 31.
9:45 a.m. Student Class studies Ro-
mans. 11:00 a.m. Rev. Robert Eads of
Colgate Rochester Divinity School.
6:45 p.m. Mr. Eads will speak to Guild
on "Christian Basis of Ethical Choice."
Single graduate students are invited
to join with the Fireside Forum group
of the First Methodist Church Sun. at
7:30 p.m. in the Youth Room for a

program on missions and for sociabil-
ity-
WCBN-will hold auditions for U.
of M. hockey game announcers and eA-
gineers at 7:15 p.m., Mon., Nov. 1 in
Rm. 3-D of the Union. All interested
students are invited to try-out.
Economics Club. Mon., Nov. 1, 8:00
p.m., Rackham Amphitheater. Lazar
volin, of the U.S. Dept. of Agricul-
ture, will discuss "Post-Stalin Russian
Economic Policy.' Public is invited.
Graduate Outing Club: If you would
like to spend a pleasurable Sunday af-
ternoon outdoors come to the Grad-
uate Outing Club at 2:00 p.m. Sun. at
the north entrance of the Rackham
building.
Hillel: Sun., 8:00-10:30 p.m. Every-

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

one is invited to the "Hillel Harvest
Hop." Cider and donuts will be served.
Strictly casual dress. Dancing to Mel
Sachs and his orchestra. Admission for
members is 35c and 65c for non-mem-
bers.
Informal Folk sing at Muriel Lester
Co-op, Sun., Oct. 31 at 8:00 p.m. Ev-
erybody invited.
Unitarian Student Group. There will
be a joint meeting with the Adult Dis-
cussion Group Sun., Oct. 31 at 8:00
p.m. at the church. The following can-
didates: George Meader, Republican,
J. Henry Owens, Democrat, and Ed-
mond Taylor, Socialist Labor Party,
will discuss election issues. Everyone in-
terested is invited. Those who want
transportation will meet at Lane Hall
or in front of Alice Lloyd at 7:30.

Lutheran Student Association-Sun.,
7:00 p.m. The program will be a dis-
cussion by the group on "The Unfin-
ished Reformation." Everyone is in-
vited to the Center, corner of Hill St.
and Forest Ave.
i-
The 3 H's
are coming
to Hillel

I ~

ICENSE'
Nye

Standard Rates
Include:
Gas and at
and Insurance.
Phone
NO 3-4156
NO 8-9757
Motor Sales
Inc.

TIP A CANOE
and Tyler House too
tropic of capricorn
and ocean of blue

TlE ANN ARBOR BANK
offers you a plan to
BANK BY MAIL
Be, sure to inquire about this plan:
SAVE TIME and MONEY
THE ANN ARBOR BANK
Corner Main and Huron Streets
U. of M. Branch, 330 South State
1108South University
CYCLING SAVES TIME IN ANN ARBOR
TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THIS LOW PRICED
TRANSPORTATION.

I1

Sunday Services at 8, 9, 11 A.M., and 8 P.M.
Lectures on The Faith of the Church at 4:30 P.M.
Supper Club at 6:30 P.M.
ST. NICHOLAS GREEK ORTHODOX
CHURCH
414 North Main
Rev. Father Eusebius A. Stephanou
9:30 A.M.-Matins Service
10:30 A.M.-Devine Liturgy
Alternate Thursdays, Nov. 4, 7:30 P.M.-Ortho-
dox Student Guild
EVANGELICAL UNITED BRETHREN
CHURCH
Broadway at Plymouth Rd.
10:00 A.M.-Sunday School
11:00 A.M.-Morning Worship
R. L. Lewis, Minister, Phone NO 3-4061
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL AND
REFORMED
423 South Fourth Ave.
Walter S:~ Press, Pastor
Warren Winkler, Director of Student Work
10:45 A.M.-Worship Service: Sermon by Rev.
Press: "The Spirit of Reformation"
7:00 P.M.-Student Guild at the Bethlehem
Church.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East Huron, Phone NO 8-7332
Rev. C. H. Loucks, Minister
Beth Mahone, Asst. Student Counselor
Sunday October 31-
9:45-Student Class studies Romans
11:00-Rev. Robert Eads of Colgate Rochester
Divinity School
6:45-Mr. Eads will speak to Guild on "Christ-
ian Basis of Ethical Choice"
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, Scientist
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
9:30 A.M.-Sunday School
11:00 A.M.-Sunday Morning Service
Oct. 31-"Everlasting Punishment"
8:00 P.M.-Wednesday: Testimonial Service
A free reading room is maintained at 339 South
Main Street where the Bible and all authorized
Christian Science literature may be read, bor-
rowed or purchased.
Reading Room hours are Monday, 11:00 A.M.
to 9 P.M.; Tuesday-Saturday 11:00 A.M. to
5 P.M.; and Sunday 2:30 to 4:30 P.M.
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. George Barger, Minister
10:45 Morning Worship. Sermon: "Is Any Sin
Un-Forgivagle?"
9:45 A.M.-Church School
CONGREGATIONAL-DISCIPLES STUDENT GUILD
7:00 P.M.-Congregational Church; Speaker:
Mrs. Elizabeth Pilot of Detroit: "Our Stake
in the Struggle of Present-Day Italy."
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
AND STUDENT CENTER
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Henry Kuizenga and George Laurent, Ministers
William S. Baker and Eduard Sue, University
Pastors
9:15 and 11:00 A.M.-"The Faith of Our Fath-
ers" -Dr. Kuizenga preaching.
6:45 P.M.-Student guild meeting.
Saturday, Oct. 30-Halowe'en Party, Weiner roast
after Indiana game-meet at the church at
7:30 p.m.
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
Father McPhillip
William and Thompson Sts.
Sunday Masses-
8:00 - 9:30 - 11:00 - 12:00
Daily-7:00 - 8:00 - 9:00
Novena Devotions-Wednesday evenings-7:30
P.M.

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
William and State Sts.
Minister-Rev. Leonard A. Parr
Minister to Students: Rev. H. L. Pickerill;
Assoc. Sue Gillespie.
Morning worship at 10:45-Dr. Parr will preach
on "Not In Circulation." This is Student
Membership day when students as well as
other adults will be received into the church.
Following the service there will be a Coffee
Hour in the Mayflower Room. Professors
Dwight Long, George Peek, Ernest F. Barker,
Axel Manin and their wives will be the hosts
and hostesses.
At the Student Guild meeting at 7:00 p.m. Mrs.
Elizabeth Pilot of Detroit and formerly of
Italy will speak on "Our Stake in the Struggle
of Present Day Italy."
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 West Stadium
(Formerly at Y.M.C.A.)
Sundays-10:15 A.M., 11:00 A.M., 7:30 P.M.
Wednesdays-7:30 P.M., Bible Study, G. Wheeler
Utley, Minister
Hear: "The Herald of Truth" WXYZ-ABQ Net-
work Sundays-1:00-1:30 P.M.
FIRST CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE
Corner Lawrence and Thayer
Phone NO 3-2139
Rev. Herbert Nation, Minister
Phone NO 2-5361
11:00 A.M.-Morning Worship.
9:45 A.M.-Sunday School: "Fish Swallowing e
Man"-come and see
7:00 P.M.-Young People's Meeting
7:45 P.M.-Evangelistic Service.
Every evening-7:45 P.M.-First Revival Ser-
vices
A hearty welcome is extended to all students.
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
State and Huron Streets, Phone NO 2-2112
Wm. C. Bennett, Pastor
9:30-Mission Sunday School on Carpenter Road
10:00-Sunday School
11:00-"Knowing Christ and Being Sure of It"
6:00-Student Guild
7:30-"Dreams of World-Empire"
Wednesday 7:30-Prayer Meeting
A cordial welcome awaits you here.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
120 South State Street
Merrill R. Abbey, Erland J. Wangdahl,
Eugene A. Ransom, Ministers
9:00 and 10:45 A.M.-Worship. "Does Error
Have Rights?" Dr. Abbey preaching.
9:30 A.M.-Student Seminar, Topic: 'Major
Methodist Beliefs."
10:30 A.M.-Student Seminar, Topic, "Great Ideas
of the Bible."
5:30 P.M.Supper and Fellowship.
6:45 P.M.-Workship and Program: "Modern
Missions" Mr. Morse Saito speaking.
Welcome to Wesley Foundation Rooms, open daily.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Saturday at 4:30: Post-game Open House
Sunday at 9:30 and at 10:45: Reformation Day
Services, with the pastor preaching on "A
Lutheran Manifesto." (Holy Communion in
both services).
Sunday at 6:00: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
Club, Supper-Program. At 7 o'clock a choral
service, "God Is Our Refuge and Strength,"
will be held in the chapel, commemorating
Reformation Day.
Tuesday at 7:15: Chapel Choir Practice
Wednesday at 9:00 P.M.: Fellowship Hour.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw, Phone NO 2-0085
Edward H. Redman, Minister
Mr. and Mrs. G. C. Bailey, Advisor to Students
Mrs. Fay A. Kincaid, Director of Religious
Education
Miss Betsy Gidley, Organist
10 A.M.-Unitarian Adult Group-Dr. James
Groves on "Psycho-Analysis and Religion."
11:00 A.M.-Service of Worship, Sermon: "Things
Most Needful" by Rev. Edward H. Redman
12:05 P.M.-Coffee Hour
5 P.M.-Unitarian Youth Fellowship at 1111 White
Street
8:00 P.M.-Unitarian Student Group and Uni-

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New Saddle-Bag Type
BICYCLE BASKET
f 4 Ap
~. \
No. 146 SADDLE-BAG

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Set of two baskets "V x 61 1 x2')
clamped securely to rear hub of bi-
cycle, then fastened over rear fender
with rubber cushioned steel clamp.
Ideal for carrying notebooks, news-
papers, groceries.
$3.50

LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER AND
CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill and Forest Avenue
6r. H. 0. Yoder, Pastor

EnglishuI

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