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October 28, 1954 - Image 5

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-10-28

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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 28,1954

THE IUCHIGAN DAILY

PAGE FINE

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 28, 19~4 TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE lIVE

Band To Make Debut
At 16th Varsity Night

University Symphony Band, un-
der the direction of Prof. William
D. Revelli will make its season's
debut at the 16th annual Varsity
Night at 8:15 p.m. tomorrow in Hill
Auditorium.
Featured In the band's perform-
ance will be stirring marches, fa-
miliar "pop" selections and other
colorful numbers.
A medley of Michigan songs en-
titled "Michigan Fantasy" will be
performed by the band conducted
by Donn Chown, program director
of station WJR in Detroit and
former University bandsman. The
medley was written when Chown
was a student here.
The "Novelaires," a quartet com-
posed of Reid Wakstaff, Barry
Floyd, Gus Gianakaris, and Tom
Lester, will sing Carmen Spadaro,
University Bands business man-
ager, remarked that, "this group
is popular on campus and should
make a big hit."
Included on the program will be
performances by Gene Jones, har-
monica player, formerly with the

Borrah Minevitch Harmonica Ras-
cals. Previous Union Opera tenors
Earl Sayer and John Geralt will
present several song selections.
Other featured acts are imper-
sonator Fritz Bell and cornetist
Emerson Head. Newt Loken, gym-
nastics coach, and four gymnastic
students will perform maneuvers
on the trampoline. Baton twirler
of the Marching Band and United
States National Champion William
Modlin will demonstrate intricate
new baton twirling methods.
The final Varsity Night act will
consist of a performance by sev-
eral members of the School of
Music faculty. Percussion instruc-
tor James Salmon will play a xylo-
phone solo.
Faculty voice instructors Dolor-
es Lowery, soprano, and Harold
Haugh, tenor, will perform. Haugh
will present a selection of Barroom
Ballads, accompanied at the piano
by John Flower. Oliver Edel, cell-
ist instructor, and Robert Courte,
violinist, will present a comedy
skit.

I

Swim Trials
To Continue
For Women
Houses Will Compete
In All-Campus Meet;
Dives, Races Featured
Preliminary tryouts for the all-
campus women's swimming meet
will continue at 8:15 p.m. today at
the women's pool.
Participating in tonight's trial
events will be representatives from
Alpha Chi Omega, Alpha Delta Pi,
Alpha Omicron Pi, Alpha Phi. Col-
legiate Sorosis, Couzens Hall, Del-
ta Gamma, Gamma Phi Beta, Kap-
pa Alpha Theta and Kappa Kappa
Gamma.
Races and Diving
Twenty-five and 50 yard races
will be held in the free style,
breast stroke and back crawl. A
free style relay will complete the
racing events. A period has also
been set aside for the judging of
diving.
Palmer, Prescott, Stockwell, Ty-
ler, Vaughn, Betsy Barbour, Chi-
cago, Chi Omega, Hobbs, Klein-
steuck, Martha Cook, Mosher and
Helen Newberry residences were
represented at a preliminary swim-
ming meet held Monday.
Top Six To Compete
Women who swim the six fast-
est times for the races and who
earn the six highest diving scores
will compete in the final swim-
ming meet. The date of this con-
test will be announced later. Mi-
chifish, WAA synchronized swim-
ming club, will also present a
swimming exhibition at this time.
Judges are members of the wo-
men's physical education staff,
physical education majors and
members of the WAA speed swim-
ming club.
Student manager of these swim-
ming events is Cynthia Camp,
chairman of the Speed Swimming
Club. Fritzie Gareis is faculty ad-
visor.
This will mark the first time
that the new women's pool will be
the scene of the meet.
Spring Weekend t
Anyone interested in peti-
tioning for the central commit-
tee of Spring Weekend can pick
up petitions at the Union Stu-
dent Offices, League Under-
graduate Office, Barbour Gym
and the WAB. All petitions are
due at 5 p.m. Tuesday at the
League or Union.
Interviews will be held Thurs-
day and Friday, Nov. 4 and 5,
at the League. For additional
information, students are asked
to call Barb Burstein at NO
2-3119 or Stan Leiken at NO
3-8505.

[

Fifty

Union Dance
To Spotlight

'U' Students To Usher
At Arts Center Plays

-Daily-Chuck Kelsey
CONFUSED TWIN-Bob Gersabeck looks for brother Norm while
more twins look on. They are, left to right, Priscilla and Anne
De Forest; Shirley and Phyllis Abbott.
Identical Twins Experience
Mix Ups, AmusingIncidents!

Red Johnson Combo
To Play for Students
At Anniversary Event
Portraying 50 years of Union ad-
vancement, decorations will carry
out the theme of the Anniversary
Ball from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Satur-
day in the Union ballroom.
Decorations chairmen, Al Dre-
bin, Lorne Singer, and Fred Zech-
man, have planned an extensive
maize and blue false ceiling. On
the walls will be two huge draw-
ings; the first depicting the Union
50 years ago and the second show-
ing the present Union.
With an eye on the years to
come, "a model of the futuristic
Union will be featured," Dance
Publicity Chairman Steve Shlanta
said.
Johnson To Play
Red Johnson and his eignt-piece
orchestra will provide music for
the Anniversary Ball. Tickets,
pricedat $1.50 per couple, will in-
clude dancing and special enter-
tainment during intermissions.
Three saxophones are spotlights
ed in the Johnson aggregation.
Playing the lead is Dave Cavitch,
with Mal Campbell on tenor and
Buz Decker on alto. Jack Straub
plays trumpet and Jim Harring-
ton handles the trombone. Pro-
viding the rhythm are Jim Pullin
with the drums and Pete Horst
and his bass.
Besides arranging all the dance
music and novelty numbers, John-
son will be seated at the piano.
Late Permission
Dressy dresses for women and
suits for men will be approapriate
attire for the evening, Dance
Chairman Harvey Rutstein de-
clared.
Late permission will be granted
coeds.
The dance will climax a day of
Union festivities beginning at 10
a.m. with the dedication of the
new Union addition.

Coeds will have an opportunity
to see the Dramatic Arts Center
plays free while they usher for two
of -the 16 performances presented
each month at the Masonic Tem-
ple.
As part of the. League Service
Committee's newest project, stu-
dents are being recruited for ush-
ering. One play is presented each
month, running from Thursday
through Sunday each week, start-
ing today.
Four women are needed each

1 1 1

They're ALL counting on ...

0i

v'

CAR

-
Fine Letter Papers

night. Coeds are especially needed
Friday and Saturday evenings.
Each student would usher twice
a month and would see the plays
one of the two nights.
Volunteers are asked to report
to the Masonic Temple at 7:30
p.m. each night they are ushering.
The plays start at 8:15 p.m.
The first Arts Center production
today is George Bernard Shaw's
"Arms and the Man." Six more
productions are scheduled.

EATON'S

Years

i

By LOU SAUER
Have you ever rushed up to one
of your best friends with an en-
thusiastic greeting only to be si-
lenced by a puzzled look and a
weak "hi"?
Look again. There is a good
chance that you weren't address-
ing your friend at all, but his iden-
tical twin. One of the most com-
mon complaints of look-alikes is
that acquaintances are constantly
accusing them of "snubbing,"
when in reality the friends had
been trying to get the attention
of their doubles.
Norman and Bob Gersabeck,
juniors from Roseville, Mich., look
so much alike that they have this
trouble constantly. The Gersa-
becks said some of their fraternity
brothers have not yet learned to
tell them apart. In fact, they
found out a few days ago that one
pledge was surprised to learn there
were two of them.
Identification Method
When they were babies, their
mother found a novel and accur-
ate method for keeping them
straight in her mind. One day she
accidentally picked Bob with a
pin, and from then until the little
wound healed she had a fool-proof
way of recognizing him.
Another pair which the reporter
found it impossible to distinguish
between insisted that they didn't
look very much alike. Shirley and
Phyllis Abbott said that once a
year their uncle, who claims they
are the image of each other, takes
a picture of them, posing them
carefully to bring out the likeness.
One of them stated (the reporter
wasn't sure which), "The funny
thing about it is that when he
shows the pictures to his friends,
no-one will believe that we are
twins!"
Two brothers who never have
this trouble are Jack and Bert
Wardrop, of Motherwell, Scotland.
Jack once had pneumonia. When
the men came to take him to the
hospital, he and Bert were asleep
in the same bed, and had somehow
rolled over and switched sides.
They were entering the hospital

room when the doctor said the boy
they had brought wasn't sick;
they realized then that they had
brought Bert instead of Jack.
Dress Alike
Emily Hauss has trouble con-
vincing her friends that she has
a twin brother, because she and
Quincey look so little alike. When
they were in grade school they
sometimes would dress alike, a sub-
ject for much teasing from friends.
Once Quincey fell and caught
his leg in a grating walking home
from school. While Emily tried to
help him, her leg got caught in
the same way. School-mates quick-
ly countered, saying, "Can't one
twin do anything at all without
the other one copying him?"
Most of the twins interviewed do
not dress alike now that they are
in college.

0
' 5

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Events Around Campus

L

FOOTBALL CLINIC-A Football
Clinic will be held from 7:15 to
8:15 p.m. today in Waterman
Gymnasium. All men and coeds
interested in learning more about
football are invited.
* * *
CONCERT - Jean Goldkette,
American pianist, will play music
of the jazz era and semi-classical
compositions at 8:15 p.m. today in
Pease Auditorium, Ypsilanti. Tick-
ets for University students will be
$1, and may be purchased at Bur-
ton Tower or at Pease Auditorium.
* * *
SOPH SCANDALS - Floorshow
rehearsal will not be held today.
* * *
SKATING CLUB-There will be
an organizational meeting of the
co-recreational Skating Club at
7:30 p.m. today in the WAB. Both
beginners and advanced skaters
are welcome.
* * *
FORTNITE-Students interest-
ed in working on Fortnite Publi-
city are requested to sign up to-
day in the League Undergraduate
Office.

A T H L E T I C' MANAGERS -
House athletic managers from
both men's and women's residences
are asked to pick up sign-up
blanks for the co-recreational vol-
leyball tournament and return
them by Monday.
* * *
MODERN DANCE-The Co-re-
creational Modern Dance Club
will meet at 7:30 p.m. today in
Barbour Gym.

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