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September 15, 1954 - Image 31

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-09-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 19M

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TAGS ELEVEN

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 1954 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAC~E ET1FVV?4

I

Dance Classes Given 'for Students,
Latest Steps Taught by Experts

Dance on your partner's feet?
You're pretty good, but would like
to learn some new steps?
Once again coeds and men will
have the opportunity to attend the
League dance classes which will
be offered during the coming se-
mester.
The' classes will be under the
direction of John Urbanic, former
dance instructor in a well-known
studio in Detroit.
Each'semester the League dance
class committee sponsors couples
classes for men and women who
attend on dates, in addition to two
singles classes for stags. and an
exhibition class.
All classes are open f r e e to
coeds. Any woman interested in
learning new dance routines and
meeting new friends can join and
act as a dance partner.
A fee of $4 is charged to men
at the beginning of the series.
'Couples will have a choice of
learning steps for well-known danc-
es like the waltz, fox trot, tango,
' rumba, or polka, or they may
choose to learn more intricate
steps like the Charleston, jitter-bug
or samba.
In the past, the dance classes
have visited the International Cen-
ter and become acquainted with
various activities of foreign stu-
dents. At the Center, they act as
partners for foreign students wish-
ing to master the steps of Ameri-
can dances.
The League dance classes will
follow this schedule:, Monday-
couples from 7:15 to 8:15 p.m.;
exhibition group from 8:30 to 9:30
p.m.; Tuesday-singles from 7:15
to 8:15 p.m.; couples from 8:30
to 9:30 p.m.; Wednesday-singles
from 7:15 to 8:15 p.m.; advanced
couples from 8:30 to 9:30 p.m.
Skirt 'nBlouse
Separates Star
In Fall Wardrobe
Separates will continue to reign
this fall, turning the typical co-
ed's ensemble into "skirt 'n
blouse" and "skirt 'n sweater"
'combinations.
Many of the skirts and blouses
can be bought separately, but
have been carefully color-match-
ed to appear as a dress when
worn together. Match-mates can
also be found in nylon, wool and
cashmere sweaters.
A boon to the coed's ironing
problem are the new gypsy skirts
and "dark fall cottons" which
need little care. They are gaily
full skirts made with two rows of
gathering guaranteed to eliminate
ironing. The dark cottons are also
made of crease-resistant materials
to save time and money.
A greater variety of colors is
now available in sailcloth play-
clothes, which can be worn year
'round. Once considered strictly a
working costume, the new sail-
cloth separates have been dressed
up with novel twists, such as the
Eisenhower-jacket style and huge
s|other-of-pearl buttons scattered
about generously. The sailcloth is
available in bright hues of green,
blue, red, yellow, orange, brown,
purple and also comes in black'
and light blue.
Denim, too, has been dressed
up, almost beyond recognition. A
full white evening denim skirt,
decorated with three huge wild
fishes, reminiscent of the popu-
lar felt skirts, and a scoop-necked
pastel denim evening blouse make
a striking combination.
Fall versions of the collegiate
"boy" shirt blouses are being
shown in short and long sleeves
with man-tailoring touches. They
come in all sorts of striped, polka-
dot, plaid, prints and plain de-

signs.
Tight-legged toreador pants and
bermuda shorts have also grown
extremely popular with college
women. Pedal-pushers and jeans
are worn to picnics, wiener roasts
and games, too.

Boutique 'Makeable' Items
Lead Fashion Wardrobe
Accessories with a boutique
look can be whipped up at home their belts, then write perso
using materials found on dime- themes on their shiny surfac
store counters.sAll that is needed with white paint. College team
is a spark of imagination and a beaux' names, bop sayings a
n o t-t o o-efficient hand detailing hit songs make these as person
these requisites of tempting bou- as a charm bracelet.
tique merchandise. Collar Studs
For college students and young The collar stud, featured in g
people, becoming fashion or fad or silver finished metal, has
conscious, possibilities are limit- mother-of-pearl tip. These are p
less for peppering their own ward- fect for the beloved boy-s h i
robes with conversation-makers, vogue, not only at the collar-butto
or for designing individual gifts. but can be used to replace butt
Many attractive themes are sug- entirely.
gested by the new assortment of All that must be done is tor
buttons and collar studs. move the original button, make
4
Autumn Fashions tiny hole in its place and pop I
Let's start with autumn's belov- stud through. Again, they g:
ed hat, the wool softy in jersey belts a smart new touch. Sl
or hand-knit. To give them a fresh made either all-around or co
look, sprinkle them with simulated centrated to the left or right
patent discs, alternating small to- the buckle, make an interesting d
ken-size buttons with the ten tail. They are utilitarian, too,f
cent size. On a red stocking cap, fountain pens or keys looped w
for instance, black buttons are gold thread can be hitched-on.
smart; on camel color, white or Decorated Slippers
brown or both, and red buttons are Right in step with the par
wonderful on gray. theme are felt slippers for at-ho:
The most whimsical hat of the wear. Smart with trouser fashi
year is a wool-knit cap with its are the squaw boots or tabby ty
own matching pony tail, a shank Collar studs can fasten these
of yarn affixed to the crown. This the side closings. A related b
pony tail may be braided, twisted of felt shaped like a mask mig
into a chignon or coronet, or worn also be adorned with collar stu
saucily like a horse's mane. Hair- especially useful at each sidea
pins, barrettes or pony tail clips, chor the ribbon streamers that
with simulated patent of pearl but- in back.
tons become effective anchors for Today's sweater looks inco
the "hair," and may be changed plete without its ornamental c
to pick up costume color accents. lar of felt, velvet or linen.t
Belts are always a coed's best basic collars, purchasable or ma
friend. Not only do they make an able buttons give a completely n
impeccable link for her favorite look. The list of possibilities
shirtwaist and skirt, but they endless. These buttons can
stamp her with originality. Us- found in a large assortment
ing the silver-dollar size patent cir- colors and sizes for decorative p
clet, school girls can sew them to poses.

DISPLAYS,

Homecoming Dates Back to*1897

ces
Ms,
and
nal
old
a
er-
rt
on,
ons
re-
ea
the
ive
its,
on-
of
de-
for
ith
rty
)me
ons
pe.
at
belt
ght
ds,
an-
tie
om-
col-
On
ak-
ew
is
be
of
ur-

DANCES IN HISTORY:

the University en masse 'to honor
the founders of their groups.
Homecoming Work
About the first week in October,
student carpenters will be busy
with hammers, saws; boards, and
paper-mache in preparation for
the judging of the now traditional
homecoming displays.
Each year the men's and wom-
en's residence halls and fratern-
ities and sororities on campus con-
struct a display to signify in some
way the strength or victory of the
"Michigan" team over the visiting
team for that particular game.
The opposing team isn't always
from the same school, and it may
be a conference or non-conference
game. Student designers pick and
use the school colors of the "ene-
my" together with the Univer-
sity's maize and blue, in bold,
bright colors. The teams' "nick-
name," such as the "Woverines"
for Michigan, is also used to ad-
vantage in the displays.
Most of the work is kept under
cover until the morning of the
homecoming game, and then it
is brought out into the open and
the campus is dotted with exhibits.
Trophies
First, second and third place
trophies are awarded to the three
best displayst inthe men's divi-
sion and the three most outstand-
ing in the women's division. Hon-
orabley mentions are also given.
The displays are judged on origin-
ality, appropriateness, artistic de-
sign, neatness and execution.
This year the homecoming game
will be the Minnesota-Michigan
game on Saturday, October 23,
which is the traditional rivalrous
game for the "little brown jug"
that dates back to 1903.

"WISHFUL THINKING"-Members of last year's Homecoming
Committee are doing some "wishful thinking" in hopes of getting
the traditional "Little Brown Jug" back in the University show-
case at the Union. The game will be played October 23.

CHARLESTON CREW-Any student can learn to dance the
Charleston like this. The League sponsors dance classes which are
taught for beginners and advanced persons, as well as for stu-
dents attending in couples or alone.
President of League Active

Center of Women's Student Gov-
ernment on campus, the Michigan
League unites a large and varied
student community. If offers the
women who want training in or-
ganization and opportunity for ser-
vice to the University community,
a chance to express themselves.
Through these experiences at the
League, qualities of leadership are
developed that should assist wom-
en in becoming leaders in civic and
national affairs after they leave
college.
League President
As 1954-55 president of the Mich-
igan League, it is Lucy Landers
job to serve as chairman of the
Women's League Council and the
Women's Senate. She is also ex-
officio vice-chairman of the Board
of Governors of the League, ex-
officio member of the Student Af-
fairs Committee and serves on the
Ethel McCormick Scholarship Com-
mittee.
Miss Landers is a member of
Mortarboard, national senior wom-
en's honorary society, and was
affiliated with Wyvern, junior hon-
orary society, last year.
The League President has been
active in campus activities since
her arrival at the University in
September, 1951. She was on the
tickets committee of Frosh Week-
end, treasurer of Sophomore Cab-
aret and worked on make-up of
the Junior Girls' Play.
Miss Landers also serves on the
University Calendar Committee
and held sophomore and junior po-
sitions on Women's Judiciary Coun-
cil. Last year she was panhellenic
gate for her sorority, Pi Beta Phi
and will be rushing chairman this
fall.
Stadium Wear
The Saturday afternoon foot-
ball games are often more like
summer than fall. Cottons and
skirts and blouses are appropri-
ate dress for coeds for the first
few games, with sweaters, heavy
woolens, stadium boots and color-
ful blankets in order for the end
of the season.
I Try FOLLETT'S First I

Coming from Philadelphia, Miss
Landers "loves music and partici-
pates in hockey, tennis, golf and
swimming" during her spare time.
This summer she has been work-
ing in the cathology. laboratory of
a hospital.

By MAGGI BOYLE
Homecoming seems to be the
forgotten holiday as far as
historians are concerned.
Old records indicate that the
traditional Saturday football game,
with dance following it, the dis-
plays and all .that goes with home-
coming as the students know it
now, dated as far back as 1897..
Then the alumni came back to
the University to play the varsity
team. Beyond those facts, the why
and wherefore of the event is a
mystery.

IFO
Alumni Association officials have
expressed thebelief that the Inter-
Fraternity Council has had some-
thing to do with its beginning. An
old issue of The Daily stated the
IFC formerly established the of-
ficial annual Homecoming Day in
1933.
Officials at the IFC office seem
to think that it may have grown
out of the old Founders Day, a
day when graduates affiliated with
campus fraternities came back to

College
FGshiofls
For
Fail

"

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USED BOOKS
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WELCOME TO THE CLASS OF 1958
AND FORMER STUDENTS
VISIT US FOR ALL YOUR
NEEDED ACCESSORIES
0 BATES BEDSPREADS & DRAPES
0 DRESSER SCARFS
B LAUNDRY BAGS
O SHOE BAGS
* SMALL THROW RUGS
* BATH TOWELS & WASH CLOTHS
*DBLANKETS
9 SHEETS & PILLOW CASES

Mademoiselle .Wra qitte Picks Thenm
ia'pti Wlle Has Them.I
Those yummy campus fashions for fall ... you saw them in Mademoiselle Maga-
zine-you'll find, them exclusively at MARTI WALKER, the campus fashion shop at U. of M.
This is one fact every queen learns quickly and well here. Not only is MARTI
WALKER the shop chosen by MLLE to Feature MLLE fashions in Ann Arbor. It's the place
you come whenever wou're looking for something new . . .

COATS

SUITS
DRESSES

FORMALS
RAINWEAR
BLOUSES
SWEATERS
SKIRTS
LINGERIE
BELTS
SCARFS
JEWELRY
HOSE

Things eye-catching and beau-catching. Things darin
and cuddly. Things for class and things for classes. The unus
idea-when that's what you want, MARTI WALKER'S for you.

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Things cozy
the dreamy

Soon as you're settled, come in and get acquainted. Browse to your heart's delight.,
Marti and her staff are here to help you, not to pester. Just get oriented to MARTI WALKER
-and you'll be known as a smart belle on campus.

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