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October 24, 1954 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-10-24

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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1954

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAs qM,1r

TI MCIGNDAL

P A (1W P1?1I AM

;

What's It Worth?
By Warren Wertheimer
'2ii::: i... .......... u:...~. }..... .............. .S...
UNDEFEATED in three conference games, including sensational
upset victories over Iowa and Minnesota, and a serious contender
for the Big Ten title and the trip to California that goes along with
it-that's the lofty and pleasant position that the Wolverine eleven
finds itself in today. Yet the person who could have predicted this
after Michigan's indifferent performance against Washington and
its horrible showing in the Army game wouldhave to be considered
a modern-day Nostradamus. This year's Maize and Blue eleven has
been one of the most puzzling teams that we have ever followed. It
has run the gauntlet from terrible through mediocre to terrific. And
the last mentioned is what the Wolverines were yesterday.
Bigger Upset ...
THE VICTORY over Minnesota was even more startling and im-
pressive than the triumph over Iowa which was rated the top
upset in the nation that Saturday. The ridiculous ease with which
the Maize and Blue routed the highly touted Gophers makes you
wonder if this isn't a good team after all-a really good team which
} comes up for a game when it has to and at other times plays jud
well enough to win. A lot bf the sting of Army's 'surprise' win over
Michigan departs as with each passing week it becomes more and
more apparent that this is one of Coach Earl Blaik's great Cadet
teams.
Bennie Oosterbaan commenting on yesterday's encounter said,
"It was our best game of the year, but don't ask me why we reached
such a peak. If I knew, I'd be a good coach." And the Wolverines
were truly at the top of their game. The line and backfield, the
offense and defense deserve equal credit for the sensational manner
in which they performed. To hold Minnesota's vaunted offense to 43
yards on the ground and 95 yards in 20 pass attempts is an accom-
plishment not to be sneered at. Equally notable is Machigan's show-
ing of 261 yards gained through and around a line that averages 218
pounds, and 182 yards via the air lanes.
Just as with the Iowa contest, yesterday's win was the result
of a tremendous team effort. But certain individual performances
stand out. Ron Kramer, the sensational sophomore end, played bet-
ter than usual, and his usual showing is pretty terrific. For that
manner, a number of ends sparkled yesterday. Tom Maentz, Mike
Rotunno and Charley Brooks played very well, especially on defense;
and with Kramer and the injured Gerry Williams, they give Michi-
gan one of the top if not the top collection of ends on any one col-
lege team in the country.
* * *
Who Was Better?..;
IT IS difficult to determine whether Lou Baldacci or Jim Maddock
shone more brightly on the gridiron yesterday as they alternated
at quarterback. Baldacci, back in the starting lineup for the first
time since the Washington game when he incurred a shoulder injury,
particularly stood out when he twice gave a beautiful exhibition of
open field running after taking short passes. He rolled up 68 yards
on the two plays. In addition he called the key play of the game
when a fourth and one on Michigan 39, Baldacci gambled for the
first down and it payed off. Maddock was his cool self as he directed
the Wolverine attack. He hit on two of three passes good for 62
yards and ran for 32 yards on a play where he seemed to be trapped
r for a loss.
Freddy Baer and Danny Cline also came up with top notch1
showings. Baer cracked the Gopher line for 94 yards and scored
twice while Cline clicked with 5 of 11 passes for 99 yards and carrieds
the pigskin across for one of the winners' five TD's. But probably1
the most important and significant performance, certainly it was
the most inspiring to the Wolverine gridders, was turned in by Tony
Branoff.
There had been stories circulating to the effect that Branoff
might be out for the season as a result of a bad knee. But the Flint
junior put all those stories to rest yesterday as he ran in the manner
that made him one of the Big Ten's leading rushers last year. Ooster-
baan used him only when Michigan got down near the Minnesota
goal line and Branoff, who was instrumental in four of the five touch-
down drives, racked up 38 yards in 8 carries. A Branoff in top shap'e
and with a sound knee could make one heck of a lot of difference in
the Wolverines' grid future.1
* 0 0 0
Injuries a Blessing?..."
THERASH of injuries which hit the Maize and Blue squad this
season may turn out to be a blessing in disguise before the season
runs its course. What with numerous starters and second stringers
hurt early in the season, Oosterbaan was forced to use players who
had seen little or no previous action. Many of these gridders perform-
ed so well that if and when Michigan returns to full strength, it will
be two and three deep with dependable performers at every position.
Men like Brooks, Maentz, Rotunno, Gene Snider, Jerry Goebel, Dick
and Dave Hill, Terry Barr, John Greenwood, and Ed Shannon (all
but Dave Hill are sophs, Hill being a junior), all of whom were
virtually unknown before the season started, have played so well
that Michigan's pigskin future, not only this year but in the next cou-
ple of years as well looks bright indeed.

As for this year's Big Ten struggle, the Wolverines and Ohio
State at present are the two top choices for the title with the latter
~'having the better chance of making it. But should both teams win
their next three contests, then on November 20, Michigan will run
into a team which is undefeated and very highly ranked nationally
and one which will be favored to whip the Maize and Blue. And I
seem to recall that the Wolverines have encountered this situation
before during the 1954 season.

USC Edges Bears
In Vital Coast Tilt

Nice

LOS ANGELES (--Quarterback
Paul Larson and the California
Bears built a roaring fire under
the Rose-Bowl bound Trojans, but
it wasn't hot enough and USC
came out on top yesterday in a bit-
terly waged contest, 29-27.
Remaining unbeaten in Pacific
Cadets Stop
Lion Squad
NEW YORK AM)-Army's fast de-
veloping football team crushed
Columbia yesterday 67-12, the high-
est score ever made in a series
that began in 1899.
Fumbles Help
Everyone on the Army bench got
into the battle and 10 men had
a hand in the scoring. Columbia
fumbles were responsible for five
Army touchdowns. The longest run
of the game was made at the
start of the second half when Tom
Bell dashed 68 yards for a touch-
down.
This was the highest score ever
run up against a team coached
by Columbia's Lou Little.
Columbia gave the crowd of 30,-
000 something to cheer about in
the closing minutes of the first
half when the Lions scored two
touchdowns in a little more than
a minute of play.
Steelers TOP
Eagles, 17.7,
In NFL Game
PITTSBURGH (P) -Quarter-
back Jimmy Finks' sensational
passing and the accurate toe of
Ed Kissell gave the revenge-hun-
gry Pittsburgh Steelers a 17-7 vic-
tory over the Philadelphia Eagles
Saturday night and put them in a
tie with the Eagles for the lead in
the eastern division of the National
Football League.
Finks threw a 52-yard touch-
down to end Elbie Nickel in the
third quarter and set up Lynn
Chandnois' 5-yard touchdown run
in the final quarter. Kissel kicked
a 24-yard field goal and converted
twice.
A crowd of 39,075-largest of any
NFL football game at Forbes
Field--saw the Steelers gain their
fourth victory in five games and
get revenge for the 24-22 setback
at the hands of the Eagles two
weeks ago in Philadelphia.

Coast Conference play, and deal-
ing the Bears a near-fatal blow to
their bowl aspirations, the Trojans
marched to victory by the margin
of a safety scored in the third
quarter.
Trojans Score Late
Southern California all but elim-
inated the Bears with a sudden
scoring burst late in the final period
to go ahead, 29-21. But with the
clock running out and 66,342 fans
hanging on to the finish, Iron Man
Larson swept the Bears 54 yards
and completed a scoring strike to
end Jim Carmichael, bringing the
final score to 29-27.
The safety came when Larson
tried a pass from his own end zone
and was dropped for two points
by end Don McFarland.
Crow Scores Twice
Heroes were many for the Tro-
jans but the scoring ace was right
No Mercy?
CORVALLIS, Ore. (p) -- The
UCLA juggernaut rolled to its
sixth consecutive football vic-
tory Saturday trampling Ore-
gon State, 61-0.
For the winners, who ran over
nine touchdowns, it was the
second consecutive walloping of
a Coast Conference opponent.
Stanford was the victim last
week, 72-0.
The most sensational score
was halfback Sam Brown's 72-
yard runback of a punt.
halfback Lindon Crow. This fleet
one scored three of USC's four
touchdowns.
Larson kept the Bears alive with
both his running and throwing. He
completed 14 out of 18 passes for
167 yards and two touchdowns.
And he made a brilliant 84-yard
run on a kickoff early in the third
to the USC one-yard line and follow-
ed it with a scoring smash.
Big Ten Standings

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone NO 23-24-1
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 ,66 1.47 2.15
3 ,77 1.95 3.23
4 .99 2.46 4.31
Figure 5 average words to, a tne.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
11:00 A.M. Saturday
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Man's plain gold wedding band
on campus. If found write 204 E.
Henry St., Saline, Mich. )27A
LOST-Blue Schaeffer Snorkle F9un-
tain pen. Lost Thursday. Reward.
Gerry, NO 2-3121. )26A
LOST: BROWN lizard skin purse, Tues-
day eve, between Angell Hall and
Williams at State. Phone, day NO
3-1511, Ext. 304; night NO 3-1455. )25A
FOR SALE
SETCHELL-CARLSON Radio AM-FM
table model, original cost $100, yours
for $50. NO 8-9085, Ask for Wally. )96B
ONE PAIR 0. W. 7x35 power binocular
with leather case. Brand new. $25.
NO 8-9670, 6-9 P.M. )100B
4x5 PRESS CAMERA and accessories, 35
mm, 2x3% enlarger, $20. Child's
bed $15; Sun-Beam mix master, $15;
chair, rug, blond coffee table, toidey
chair, 2 student lamps, 2 table lamps.
NO 2-3245. )106B
The Best for Less
1950 PLYMOUTH CONVERTIBLE
with radio and heater. A
real good buy, $545.
1947 PLYMOUTH CONVERTIBLE
radio and heater, one year old
top, $195.
1950 FORD CUSTOM 6, two door
radio, heater and over-drive.
$495.
1948 FORD STATION WAGON,
four door, excellent condition,
$345.
1948 KAISER four door, won.
derful transportation. $145.
1942 CHEVROLET two door, $65.
1946 FORD CLUB COUPE, V-8
engine, good tires, good body.
$245.
1936 FORD two door, runs good.
$65.
Two used car lots: 503 E. Huron,
NO 2-3261; East Ann Arbor, cor-
ner of Packard and Platt, NO
2-0171. Both lots open evenings
till 9:00.
Herb Estes, Inc.
)89B
1955 MODEL SPORTSMAN Trailer. 19
foot, all modern, sleeps 4, $500 equity
and take over payments. Call Yps
1141 1. )105B
TEN CARS ALL PRICED UNDER $100.
Chevies, Fords, Plymouths. The big
lot across from the downtown car-
port. Huron Motor Sales. 222 W.
Washington, NO 2-4588. )103B
1947 PLYMOUTH four door sedan, radio
and heater. The big lot across from
the downtown carport. Huron Motor
Sales. 222 V. Washington. NO 2-4588.
)104B
1949 CHEVROLET two door, blue, radio,
heater. One owner, real nice. The
big lot across from the downtown
carport. Huron Motor Sales. 222 W.
Washington. NO 2-4588. ) 10B
1947 DODGE two door, green, radio
and heater. The big lot across from
downtown carport. Huron Motor
Sales, 222 W. Washington, NO 2-4588.
)102B
REVERE STERO CAMERA with acces-
sories, Exakta VX f2, telephoto and
wide angle lenses, electric flash. Far
below list. NO 3-0902. )98B

FOR SALE
VM TRIOMATIC 3 speed turntable, var-
iable reluctance, G.E. Cartridge with
diamond stylus. Call NO 2-2834)at
6 p.m. )95B
FALL CLEARANCE
SALE
USED CAMERAS
Voightlander Vitessa-F 2.0 Ultron
lens, 1-1/500th Sec. Shutter, full
M/X Synch, Case, Filters. LIKE
NEW, $110.00.
Exa 35mm Single Lens Reflex-F 2.8
lens, case. LIKE NEW, $60.00.
Argus C-2-F 3.5 lens, $15.00.
Argus C-4-1952 Model with 1/200th
shutter, $65.00.
Graflex Series B-4x5 with 6%" F 4.5
Kodak Anastigmat, $45.00.
Grafnex-Latest model Super D 4x5
with automatic diaphragm. 190mm
F 5.6 Ektar, Pack Adapter,, Roll
Film Adapter. LIKE NEW, $175.00.
Voightander Bessa-F 4.5 Heliar
lens, 1-1/400th Sec., with cae,
$49.50.
xl2cm Cut Film Camera with F 4.5
Schneider Xenar. Ideal for Por-
trait or copy work. $25.00.
Uniflex-Like new with case and
flash, $19.50.
Keystone A-7-16mm roll load with
F 2.7 lens $45.00.
Kodak Reflex-F 3.5 lens, with case
$69.00.
Flexaret-Twin Lens Reflex with
F 3.5 lens, 1-1/200th Sec., Crank
Film advance, Case, $55.00.
Ansco Speedex-F 4.5 Ions. % to
1/250th Sec. $19.50.
Zeiss Nettar-2%x3% Folding cam-
era with F 3.5 lens, 1-1/400th Sec.
Shutter, Case, $29.50.
"Purchase from Purchase"
PURCHASE CAMERA SHOP
1116 S. University Phone NO 84972
)94B
1946 CHEVROLET CLUB COUPE, new
overhaul, good rubber, radio and heat-
er. The big lot across from the car
port. Huron Motor Sales. 222 W. Wash-
ington. NO 2-4588. )76B
1949 PLYMOUTH Convertible, Radio,
Heater, runs perfect, good top. The
big lot across from downtown car-
port. Huron Motor Sales, 222 W.
Washington. NO 2-4588. )64B
.PURCHASE FROM PURCHASE"
Kodak reflex camera with f 3.5
lens, including case $5.
Purchase Camera Shop, 1116 South
University. )11B
1949 FORD, 2 door Sedan. Radio, heat-
er, and overdrive. Price $365. Fitz-
gerald-Jordan. 607 Detroit. Phone NO
8-8141. )69B
STANDARD PICA typewriter. Good con-
dition. Reasonable, 830 S. Main. )21B
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords-$.88. Sox,
39c; shorts, 69c; military supplies.
Sam's Store, 122 . Washington. )26B
FOR RENT
FURNISHED 3 rooms and bath. Private
entrance, South Division. Phone aft-
er 5:30. NO 8-6631. )OC
ROOM AND BOARD
ROOM for SEVERAL BOARDERS. Con-
tact House Manager at NO 2-8312. )6E
ROOMS FOR RENT
TWO SINGLE ROOMS for rent, refrig-
erator privileges, furnished. Few
blocks from campus. Inquire 906
Greenwood. Phone NO 2-7108. )14D
TWO SINGLE ROOMS for students.
314 N. Thayer, Phone NO 3-5400. )13D
DOUBLE ROOM for rent, modern furn-
ishings, near campus. 1111 White

ROOMS FOR RENT
ROOMS FOR FOOTBALL WEEKENDS.
Reserve rooms now. Student Room
Bureau. No fee charged. NO 3-8454. )4D
ROOMS FOR FOOTBALL WEEKENDS.
Reserve rooms now at the Campus
Tourist Homes. 518 E. William (near
State St.) Ph. NO 3-8454. )3D
PERSONAL
YIP-open we are. Student Periodical,
NO 2-3061. )24F
TRANSPORTATION
EUROPE $399-30 day 4,500 mile auto
tour, 7 countries. Free insurance and
NTC membership. As leader you may
qualify for transportation free tour.
TEMPLEMAN TOURS, 337 W. Mason,
Jackson, Michigan. )60
HELP WANTED
WANTED: 5 ambitious male students
by national firm for training for sales
positions. Earn $35.00 to $55.00 weekly,
No canvassing. Car necessary. Inter-
view in Room 3528, Ad Building,
Tues., Oct. 26 from 1 to 4 p.m.
WANTED: PIANO MAN for three piece
orchestra. Steady Saturday night
club job. Call NO 3-2576. )13A
PHOTOGRAPHERS - (Perfectionists
Only) for part time work on campus.
If you want that ROLLEI to pay it's
own way. Call GARDNER'S PHOTO-
GRAPHIC, Ypsilanti 5948W3. )14H

BUSINESS SERVICES
R. A. MADDY-VIOLIN MAKER. Fine
instruments, Accessories, Repairs. 310
S. State, upstairs.,Phone NO 2-5962.
) 101
WASHING-Finished work and hand
ironing. Rough dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately, Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone NO 2-9020. Spec-
alize in winter cottons and biouses,
wool soxs washed also. )81
RA DIO-PHONO-TV
Service and Sales
Free Pick-Up and Delivery
Past Service - Reasonable Rates
"Student Service"
ANN ARBOR RADIO AND TV
1217 S. University, Phone NO 8-7942
1% blocks east of East Eng. )481
HELP WANTED: WOMEN
MAKE EXTRA MONEY. Address, Mail
postcards spare time every week.
BICO, 143 Belmont, Belmont, Mass.
)EP
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds.
I RENT-A-CAR1

.ICENSE
Nye

Standard Rates
Include:
Gas and oil
and Insurance.
Phone
NO 3-4156
NO 8-9757
Motor Sales
Inc.

WANTED: Students interested in form-
ing Marionette Theater group. De-
signs, construction, lighting, acting,
playwriting, etc. NO 3-3854 even-I
ings. )12H1

uN

f
Restaurant and Pizzeria
PIZZA IS OUR SPECIALTY
1204 South University
10:30 A M. to 11 P.M. Closed Saturdays

W L
Ohio State ....4 0
Michigan .......3 0
Wisconsin ......2 1
Minnesota ......2 1
Purdue .........1 1
Iowa..........2 2
Michigan State .1 3
Northwestern .. .0 2
Illinois ..........0 2
Indiana ........0 3

T
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

Pct.
1.000
1.000
.667
.667
.500
.500
.250
.000
.000
.000

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NHL HOCKEY
Montreal 7, New York 1
Boston 3, Toronto 3 (tie)
Chicago 4, Detroit 2

Collegiate Grid Scores

EAST
rtmouth 13, Harvard 7
Holy Cross 14, Boston University 13
Pitt 14, Northwestern 7
Temple 19, Brown 14
Colgate 13, Yale 13
Cornell 27, Princeton Q
Navy 52, Penn 0
Army 67, Columbia 12
California Teachers 34, slippery Rock
Teachers 13

SOUTH
West Virginia 40, VMI 6
North Carolina 14, Wake Forest 7
Kentucky 13, Georgia Tech 6
Tennessee 14, Dayton 7
Miss. St. 12, Alabama 7
Georgia 7, Tulane 0
Auburn 33, Florida St. 0
Duke 21, North Carolina State 7
SOUTHWEST
Rice 13, Texas 7
Arkansas 6, Mississippi 0
Oklahoma 21, Kansas St. 0
SMU 36, Kansas 18
TCU 20, Penn St. 7
Baylor 20, Texas A&M 7
FAR WES'T
Utah 14, Wyoming 7
UCLA 61, Oregon St. 0
Stanford 13, Washington 7
USC 29, California 27

MIDWEST
Michigan 34, Minnesota 0
Purdue 27, Michigan State
Fordham 14, Marquette 14
Nebraska 20, Colorado 6
Iowa 27, Indiana 14
Missouri 32, Iowa State 14
Illinois 34, Syracuse 6
Ohio State 31, Wisconsin 14

13

Street. .___... P oeNO 2,..., raD
. _ _ _

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