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October 24, 1954 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-10-24

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Homecoming Weekend:SomethingtoRei

mtember

HOMECOMING WEEKEND-
FIRST THE WORK, PUTTING UP THE DISPLAYS ...

BUT A ROUSING CHEER ... A FEW BLOCK 'M' STUNTS.. .AND AKE IT SOMTHING TO REMEMBER
* * * * * * * *H

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THE INDEPENDENT
VOTER
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Latest Deadline in the State FAIR, MMD

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VOL. LXV, No. 30 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1954

EIGHT PAGES

IlL

I

Pact To Permit
wGerman Army
15 Allied Nations Sign Agreements
Following Saar Basin Compromise
PARIS (Mi - Inceremonies of the greatest historic significance, 15
Western nations signed agreements yesterday to bring 500,000 rearmed
West Germans into the Allied defensive alliance against Communist
aggression.
The action brought immediate and unfavorable Soviet reaction.
The last hurdle was dramatically cleared by an 11th hour com-
promise settlement of the long and acrimonious dispute between France
and West Germany over the future of the coal-steel rich Saar--once
German, now tied economically to France.
As the foreign ministers solemnly affixed their signatures to the
pacts, the Soviet Union denounced them as war-breeding instruments.
In notes to the United States, Britain and France the Russians proposed
once again that the Big Four meet next month and wrestle with the
r German problem-on Soviet terms.

Little Brown Jug
Regained by'M'
Wolverines Surprise Homecoming
Crowd of 70,303 in Crucial Test
By HANLEY M. GURWIN
Associate Sports Editor
Michigan did it again-and this time in grand style.
Scoring in every quarter, the Wolverines dominated the game
from the opening kick-off till the closing seconds to completely stun
a favored and previously unbeaten Minnesota eleven, 34-0, before a
Homecoming Day crowd of 70,303 fans here yesterday.
For the second time this season, Michigan overcame the odds
to dump one of the nation's top teams, the first time being the
14-13 victory over Iowa.
An Easy Victory
Unlike the Hawkeye clash, when the Wolverines had to fight

Soviet Note
Seeks New
Conference
MOSCOW (RP)-The Soviet Un-
ion yesterday vehemently de-
nounced the London-Paris agree-
ments for rearming Western Ger-
many and proposed again a meet-
ing of the Big Four foreign min-
isters to settle the problem of re-
unifying Germany.
The Soviet note, suggesting that
the meeting be held next month
was handed to the American, Brit-
ish and French ambassadors at
the very time the London accords
bringing Western Germany intc
the Western defense alliance were
being signed in Paris.
This decision of rearming West-
ern Germany, the note said, "rad-
ically contradict the interests oI
the maintenance of peace and in-
tensifies the threat of a new war
in Europe."
West Not Surprised
Few Western diplomats were
surprised by the timing of the
note which, in effect, rejected pre-
vious Western conditions for a Big
Four meeting. These included de-
mands that the Soviet Union agree
to sign an Austrian independence
treaty and to hold genuinely free
all-German elections before any
such conference takes place,
The note condemned the Lon-
don-Paris agreements as "opening
the way for reestablishment of
German militarism."
"Western Germany would be

Must Be Ratified
All agreements reached
are subject to parliamentary ratifi-
cation. This may be difficult in
France and West Germany where
many political leaders favor an-
other try at ending the cold war
with Russia first.
Aside from the Saar agreement
-which isn't textually final as yet
-these things were done:
1. The United States, Britain,
France and Germany agreed to
end the Allied occupation of West
Germany and to restore all but full
sovereignity to the West Germans.
2. Britain, France, Belgium, the
Netherlands, Luxembourg, West
Germany and Italy joined in an
enlarged Brussels pact which con-
, tains more definite controls over
armament of its members than
does the North Atlantic Treaty Or-
ganization pact.

-Daily-Dick Gaskill
TONY BRANOFF, WOLVERINE BACK RETURNING TO ACTION, RIPS THROUGH THE MINNESOTA LINE. BILL GARNER
MAKES THE TACKLE, MICHIGAN WON THE TRADITIONAL 'BROWN JUG' GAME, 34 TO 0.
Surris--Ad Eerone e-& Happy

back after spotting Iowa two qui
Maize and Blue virtually ran away<-
with the game.
They went around, through, and1
over the Gopher line with amaz-
ing success while on defense they
stopped the hard-charging Min-
nesota backfield men dead in
their tracks.

National
Roundup

touchdowns, yesterday

the

By The Associated Press

By JON SOBELOFF
Daily Editorial Director
According to the boys in the press
box, it was a 'crazy game,'
A big surprise, that is. None of
the experts expected the Wolver-
ines' razzle-dazzle display of pow-
er. Afterwards, they were saying
the team hadn't looked so good
in four years.
It was perfect weather for base-
ball. The seventy thousand fans
couldn't have asked for a better
homecoming demonstration as the
Maize and Blue took command with
line power, shifty running and
sharp passing to hand the nation's

number eight team a five touch- Elbel walked slowly onto the field, it was just a great big Michigan
down drubbing. took the podium, and led the band afternoon."
Bounce Balloons in a vigorous rendition of his song.
End zone fans got so confident He walked off faster, stopping to
during the second half they start- wave to the cheering crowd. M d Bo
ed bouncing a couple of balloons Everyone Happy
around just to keep amused. Football shared the spotlight
The Block-M section looked sharp. Campus police expected to have with a male beauty contest in
And the band looked so good at their hands full with happy unap- the annual Mud Bowl played
half-time that its Charleston rou- proved party goers. by Phi Delta Theta and Sigma
tine brought cries of "more" and Everybody was happy, in fact, Alpha Epsilon yesterday.
it encored with stiff-legged inter- even a few lawyers whose class w
pretation of Sh-Boom. was drowned out by a homecoming The Phi Delts won the game
Alumni, students and 'just plain' display recording blaring across 15 to 12, and Jim McGarvey,
Alumi, sudens an jut plin'55, sponsored by Kappa Delta
fans responded with a prolonged the street. was pronounced Mud Bowl
standing ovation for Louis Elbel, According to the oldtimers, Field- squeenB
'01, composer of "The Victors." ing Yost would have said, "Well,

HAYDEN TAKES ILIC TROPHY:
DslyPrizes Awarded to Si Ep'k
}--Alpha Phi and Sigma Phi Epsi-
ion won the awards for the best
Homecoming displays yesterday.
A special award given by IHC
to independent men's dormitories
was awarded Hayden House, EQ.
Alpha Phi's slogan was "Min-
nie's the Time They've Been
Moused." The display showed a>
mouse for each year that Michi-
gan has captured the Little Brown
Jug.
Sig Ep's display showed UPA s
cartoon figure "The Nearsighted
(More display pictures on Page 5) ,
~ ~ ,, ~

For a change, the statistics do
tell the true story of the contest.
Michigan piled up an astronomi-
cal total of 443 net yards for the
afternoon while the Gophers could
muster only 138. In racking up a
17 to five advantage in the first-
downs column, the Wolverines
rolled to 261 yards on the ground
compared to Minnesota's 43.
From the moment that Wolver-
ine Danny Cline returned the
opening kick-off back to his own
39-yard line, it was evident to the
cheering crowd that the Maize
and Blue were primed for another
upset.
After an exchange of punts,
Michigan began a drive on its own
30-yard line which was not stop-
ped until the Gophers stiffened
and held on their own one.
Branoff Scorers
Not to be thwarted, Cline gath-
ered in a Minnesota punt on the
next play and ran it back to the
13. Tony Branoff, back in the
line-up for the first time in three
weeks, galloped with the ball the
rest of the way in two plays.
Kramer converted the first of
four perfect extra-points (he has
not missed one this season) and
the Wolverines led 7-0 with 12:35
gone in the quarter.
Midway through the second per-
iod, Michigan culminated an 80-
yard march as fullback Fred Baer
cracked over left guard for the
first of his two touchdowns. The
drive took only eight plays and

Attacks Williams...
IONIA, Mich. - Postmaster Gen-
eral Arthur E. Summerfield delet-
ed a "goose" reference from his
prepared speech at a Republican
campaign rally here last night.
In his prepared text issued to
newsmen by Republican National
Headquarters, Summerfield, at-
tacking Democratic Gov. G. Men-
nen Williams, said:
"The time is long past when we
can afford to continue in office a
governor who tries to play the
goose to every Michigander."
* * *
Prison Riot ...
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. - Ano-
ther riot broke out in Missouri's
trouble-ridden state prison yester-
day.
One convict was killed and about
20 were hospitalized. Gun-wield-
ing officers quelled the uprising in
about an hour.
* * *
FHA Dismissals...
WASHINGTON - President Ei-
senhower said yesterday 21 officials
appointed to the Federal Housing
Administration prior to 1953 have
been dismissed as a result of an
FHA investigation of housing scan-
dals.
* * *
GI's Ousted.. .
WASHINGTON - The Arnmy said
yesterday it has ousted 15 GI's

Alpha Phi

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