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October 23, 1954 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-10-23

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SATURDAY, OCTOBER 23,1934

THE MICHIGAN UATLV

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SAURA, CI'BE 3,154211%1 a IWy~f 11\Al fl A W.V

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CHAIRMAN OF LYL:
Wofsy To Test Right
Of Public Assembly

By LOUISE TYOR
The question of whether "any
group in Ann Arbor has the right
to hold a public assembly to, hear
the Marxist view on any question"
will be tested this year by the La-
bor Youth League, according to
Leon Wofsy, national chairman of
the organization.
Traveling through the Midwest
to discuss the issues of the coming
elections, Wofsy mentioned that the
prohibition on the airing of views
Spinach May
Cause Harm
Doctor Says
By ELISSA PANUSH
"God never intended man to eat
spinach-He made it for cows."
Melbourne Murphy, health serv-
ice administrative assistant, quot-
ed the late Professor Thurman
Rice of the University of Indiana
when asked if the recent rumors
that spinach was harmful had any
valid medical basis.
Popeye, Children Differ
Some medical men currently be-
lieve that children's dislike for
spinach may be a defensive me-
chanism. In a recent letter to the
British Medical Journal, physi-
cians Joan and Normand Banj
state that "the food that builds
muscles in Popeye seldom does the
same in Junior."
Spinach contains .031 oz. oxalic
acid per 3.5 oz. of spinach. This
amount of acid, if taken internal-
ly, would cause the percipitation
of calcium from the blood stream.
This action might result in con-
vulsions leading to death. Most of
the oxalic acid in spinach is not
available for body use. Rhubarb,
beet greens, and Poke also contain
-4 large amounts of this acid.
Nails Suggested
"Parents who force their chil-
dren to eat spinach because of its
high iron content," a pediatrician
at the University hospital com-
mented, "might just as profitably
have their kids suck ten-penny
nails. They contain the same
amount of iron." The doctor con-
tinued, "Spinach is a good green
vegetable though, it contains chlo-
rophyll, if you like chlorophyll."
Dr. Henry Swain of the pharma-
cology department said, "I believe
spinach has its value. It's food for
the soul and makes kids learn who
Is boss."
Alumnus Gets
Research Post
Marshall D. Shulman, '37, has
assumed his duties as associate di-
rector of the Russian Research
Center of Harvard University.
Under Prof. William L. Langer,
director of the Center, Shulman
will administer basic studies of the
economic, political and social or-
ganization of Russia.
r He has just returned from
France where he studied opera-
tions of the French Communist
Party in relation to developments
in Moscow.
His study was made possible by
a $15,000 scholarship under the
Rockefeller Public Service Award
which he received in February,
1953.
While at the University, he was
a member of Michigamua and
managing editor of The Michigan
Daily.
After he was graduated from
the University, Shulman joined
the staff of the Detroit News and
was a State Department specialist.

During World War II, he was a
glider pilot and a psychological
warfare officer in the Pacific.

in Ann Arbor "stands out much
more so than at other places."
No Legal Sanction
Last semester members of the
LYL were unable to find a public
building in which to hold meetings,
and this semester they intend to
find out "if the First Amendment
does or does not prevail in Ann Ar-
bor," said Wofsy. "There is no le-
gal sanction that would in any way
explain the deprivation of these
rights," he added.
Wofsy also said that he feels
there are many people who would
like to come to a LYL meeting, or
hear the LYL point of view; some
of these naturally would come out
of curiosity, or "simply to heckle,"
he commented. However, the LYL
would be willing to have an open
meeting if a place could be found.
Formed For Young People
"The LYL was set up of, by, and
for young people," Wofsy ex-
plained. "The main concern is
with the problem of young people
based on the principle that the in-
terests of youth are tied up with
the immediate and long-range
needs of workers."
"It is an educational organization
which bases itself on the philosophy
which views all questions from the
interests of the working class -
Marxism.' The group is open to
all, regardless of whether they ac-
cept the principles of Marx; as
long as they are in sympathy with
the aims of the group.
The program of the LYL is "pro-
gressive, pro-labor;" the activities
"cover thegamut of any political-
ly-minded group," said Wofsy.
They include educational forums,
rallies and debates on all social is-
sues. The group also takes part in
all forms of legislative activity con-
cerned with young people.
English Law
Students Give
Views on U.S.
By MERLE MAYERSTEIN
David Barker, Grad. and Alan
Mewett, Grad., two Englishmen en-
rolled in the law school, are learn-
ing about America.
Both students already have their
law degrees in England, and are
members of the English Inns of
Court, composed of four profes-
sional law schools.
Barker is a member of Inner
Temple and has his law degree
from the University of London.
Mewett, on the other hand, belongs
to Gray's and has two degrees; one
from Oxford and the other from
the University of Birmingham.
Reasons For Trip To U.S.
Their reasons for coming to
Michigan lie in their desire to see
America, and the University law
school's international fame. Cook
fellowships from the law school
are taking care of their educational
expenses, and Fulbright travel
grants paid their expenses here,
and will take them back to Eng-
land.
America's friendliness and hos-
pitality have made the biggest im-
pression on them. "We haven't
met an unpleasant person yet,"
Mewett commented.
Discussing education he said,
'The professional schools of Amer-
ica are as good as any we've got."
Barker on the other hand, believes
that people mature quicker in Eng-
land than they do in America. They
don't leave high school until the
age of 18 or 19 and then go right
into professional schools.
Basic Difference
"The basic difference is that we
live to learn, and you learn to
live," Barker observed.
Mewett is majoring in compara-
tive constitutional law and intends
to teach, either at Oxford, Univer-

sity of Birmingham or University
of London. Barker, studying civil
law, will practice in England. ,

-Daily-Dick askili
ST. BERNARDS EYE PRIZE

Victorious St. Bernard To Win
Brandy Keg in Chariot Race

By LOU SAUER
With a wooden brandy keg as
the prize, Delta Upsilon and Lamb-
da Chi Alpha will hold the first
annual all-campus St. Bernard
Cha'riot Race at 11 a.m. today.
The race will begin at the north-
west end of the diagonal, finishing
at the engineering arch.
Phyllis Frank, '55, Delta Delta
Delta, will represent her sorority's
support of Delta Upsilon's Brandy
by leading him to the starting line.
Pi Beta Phi will send Dorothy Al-
laben, '56 Ed., to attend to Ma-
jor's needs at the beginning of the
race, as a sign of its support of
Lambda Chi Alpha.
Dick Buck, '55, said that he or-
iginally got the idea for the an-
nual race a few days ago when he
was thinking of the rivalry between
the two dogs, whichvare the only
two St. Bernards on campus.
Friendship To Start
"I thought that it was a shame
that these two dogs hadn't gotten
together before this, and the char-
iot race seemed a good way to be-
gin their friendship," he said.
The two fraternities and the sup-
porting sororitiies built Roman
chariots yesterday. The members
stressed that any St. Bernard is
welcome to enter, provided, of
course, that he brings his own
chariot.
At the start of the race, two
small dogs will be sitting in the
chariots. It is hoped that they will
remain in their respective vehicles
to cheer their St. Bernard on to
victory. The members, however,
think that this is too much to hope
for.
Both Major and Brandy love
to chase squirrels, but there the
similarity ends. There is a rumor
going around the two houses that
Major is madly in love with a
Mexican hairless that Brandy de-
spises.
Major, whose official title is Ma-
jor von Schwartzhold the Fourth,
ISTENLE EASPLE
EOPLEPE!
Que veulent les
jeunes files le
Samedi soir?
Why, anybody knows that
go to the
HOMECOMING
DANCE
the Brown Jug Ball
Saturday, October 23
Featuring:
WOODY HERMAN
and ORCHESTRA
$3.60 per couple

became a part of the Lambda Chi
house two years ago after the
death of their third St. Bernard,
Major Better Behaved
According to Dick Good, '56
A&D, president of Lambda Chi,
Major is a much better behaved
dog than were his three predeces-
sors. "Our other dogs used to
frighten the mailmen and butt their
heads into trees. Major is a very
good-natured dog," noted Good.
Every year Major attends the an-
nual Christmas party, where he
plays with the children and even
lets them ride on his back. Con-
cerning other canines, though, Ma-
jor's affability is subject to suspi-
cion. At the present time he is
nursing a wound on his leg re-
ceived in a scuffleiwith another
member of his species.
Brandy, on the other hand, is
appalled at the idea of a human
sitting on his back. The DU's got
him about six years ago when one
of the members, on a trip to Cana-
da, sent him to the house as a
present. His history is not as tran-
quil as that of Major.
Five years ago, Brandy ran for
SL on a write-in campaign. Had he
won he would have revolutionized
student government at the Univer-
sity. Last year he won the contest
which elected the most popular
dog on campus.
The wooden keg (empty, how-
ever) to be awarded as the prize
in this morning's race, is encircled
by a metal band upon which will
be engraved the name of the win-
ner. Everyone is invited to watch
the race and cheer for their favor-
ite dog.

Regents OK
New Slate
For Degrees
(Continued from Page 1)
Scholarship, which will be con-
tinued.
Two emeritus titles were approv-
ed by the Regents. Frank E. Rob-
bins was given the title of assist-
ant to the president, emeritus, and
director emeritus of the Univer-
sity Press. Prof. Orlando W. Steph-
enson was given the title of pro-
fessor emeritus of the teaching
of history.
Prof. Charlotte I. Hayner was
appointed visiting associate pro-
fessor of libary science, two-thirds
time, for the 'second semester of
the 1954-55 year.
Approval of Towsley
Approval was given to the ap-
pointment of Prof. Harry A. Tow-
sley of the Medical School as as-
sistant director of the Depart-
ment of Postgraduate Medicine.
A vacancy on the Board of Gov-
ernors of the Michigan League
was filled by the appointment -of
Mrs. Natalie Mattern Frey of De-
troit. Mrs. Frey will complete the
unexpired term of Mrs. Jessie Mc-
Call Taggart, who has resigned.
Prof. George Piranian of the
mathematics department was
granted leave, without pay, for the
second semester of 1954-55 so that
he may accept a contract from the
Office of Ordinance Research for
investigation in his special field
of mathematics.
Approval of the assignment of
Prof. Laurence C. Stuart to field
work in Guatemala from Jan. 1
to Sept. 15, 1955, was given.
Thomassen Gets Leave
Prof. Lars Thomassen of the
chemical and metallurgical engi-
neering department was granted
sabbatical leave for the first se-
mester of 1955-56 to continue an
investigation of the oxidation of
certain nickle alloys.
Prof. Lloyd E. Brownell of the
chemical and metallurgical engi-
neering department was granted a
half-time leave, without salary, for
1954-55, to continue his work as
supervisor of the Fission Products
Laboratory in the Engineering Re-
search Institute.
Charles M. Thatcher of the
chemical and metallurgical en-
gineering department was given
leave, without salary, for 1954-55
so that he might obtain industial
experience in the area of his
teaching work.
Dean of Law School E. Blythe
Stason was given leave from Oct.
30 to Dec. 15, 1954, in order that;
he may go to England and Europe
for special investigations into the
field of legal problems in nuclear
enterprise.

Amsterdam's Concertgebouw Or-
chestra conducted by Edvard Van
Beinum, will appear at 8:30 p.m.
Wednesday in Hill Auditorium as
part of its first American Tour.
The State of Michigan is the
only state on the Orchestra's
schedule with more than two ap-
pearances listed. They will appear
in Detroit Tuesday, here Wednes-
day and then perform in East
Lansing and Grand Rapids.
"It's a chance of a lifetime,"
said Charles Sink, president of the
University Musical Society, as he
discussed the local concert by the
Concertgebouw. "Music-lovers go-
ing to Europe usually have the
Amsterdam Concertgebouw on
their list of 'musts'," he said, "and.

yet we are able to see them in our
own community here at Hill Au-
ditorium."
Orchestra Receptions
In some cities, local committees
are being organized to welcome
the Orchestra. Receptions, after-
concert parties as well as enter-
tainment for the orchestra per-
sonnel by local music enthusiasts
are being planned. In addition, the
Dutch flag will be displayed at
concert halls in many of the cities
on route.
Their first concert appearance
was in New York's Carnegie Hall'
Oct. 12 and will continue through
Dec. 3, with stops being made
throughout the eastern part of

the country and as far south
New Orleans.
Royal Patronage
The tour of the Concertgeb
(which means "Concert Hall"
under the "Patronage of Herf
jesty the Queen of the Nett
lands."
Until the end of 1952 the
chestra was managed by the C
certbebouw Ltd. Now, it has b
made into a Foundation on
own.
Wednesday's concert will
elude works by Beethoven, Dem
sy, Escher and Stravinsky.
Tickets priced at $3.50, $3, $2
$2 and $1.50 are still availablf
the offices of the University r
sical Society in Burton Tower.

FIRST AMERICAN TOUR:
Dutch Orchestra To Perform Here

EVANGELICAL UNITED BRETHREN
CHURCH
Broadway at Plymouth Rd.
10:00 A.M.-Sunday School
11:00 A.M.-Morning Worship
7:30 P.M.-Evening Service
R. L. Lewis, Minister, Phone NO 3-4061
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL AND
REFORMED
423 South Fourth Ave.
Walter S. Press, Pastor
Warren Winkler, Director of Student Work
10:45 A.M.-Worship Service: Sermon by Rev.
Press: "The Renewal of Our Life."
7:00 P.M.--Student Guild at the Bethlehem
Church. Speaker will be Rev. Press.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed Churches
of Michigan)

Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director
Res. Ph. NO 5-4205. Office Ph.
10:00 A.M.-Morning Service
7:00 P.M.-Evening Service

NO 8-7421

U

I

ATTENTION
Enlgineering Graduates
and
Nr. Engineering tudents
Majoring in electrical, mechanical and
aeronautical engineering and in physics
and math.
Start your career 'with Sperry, leading engineering
company enjoying an enviable record of stable,
consistant growth through the development of new
and better products since 1910
Following are some of the engineering fields Sperry
is engaged in:
Electronics - Microwave - Radar - Servo-Mechanisms
Computers - Aircraft Navigation - Electronic tube
development including Klystrons - Fractional H.P.
motors and transformers - Communication equipment
Loran - Sonar - Fire control equipment - Controls for
Guided Missiles - Technical writing - Standards
engineering work - digital computers - solid state
devices, etc.
O 9 graduate schools available in vicinity of laboratory
for further studies through company paid tuition re-
fund program.
O Modern lab facilities and equipment available to you
for the further development of your technical educa-
tion.
O Association with top men in the field
O Top rates
. Full employee benefits
O Modern plant, in suburban area, 45 minutes from the
heart of New York City
O Convenient transportation
O Recreational facilities and congenial friendly associates
* Adequate attractive housing available
* A satisfying, well paid career awaits you at Sperry
SUMMERTIME POSITIONS OPEN
FOn R TUDENT S I JUIOR YEvsARn

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FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, Scientist
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
9:30 A.M.-Sunday School
11:00 A.M.-Sunday Morning Service
Oct. 17-Doctrine of Atonement
8:00 P.M.-Wednesday: Testimonial Service
A free reading room is maintained at 339 South
Main Street where the Bible and aff authorized
Christian Science literature may be read, bor-
rowed or purchased.
Reading Room hours are Monday, 11:00 A.M.
to 9 P.M.; Tuesday-Saturday 11:00 A.M. to
5 P.M.; and Sunday 2:30 to 4:30 P.M.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 West Stadium
(Formerly at Y.M.C.A.)
Sundays-10:15 A.M., 11:00 A.M., 7:30 P.M.
Wednesdays-7:30 P.M., Bible Study, G. Wheeler
Utley, Minister
Hear: "The Herald of Truth" WXYZ-ABC Net-
work Sundays- 1:00-1 :30 P.M.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
AND STUDENT CENTER
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Henry Kuizenga and George Laurent, Ministers
William S. Baker and Eduard Sue, University
Pastors
9:15 A.M.-George Laurent preaching on "The
25th Hour"
11:00 A.M.-Receiving of Affiliate Members. Ser-
mon :"Lost in the Crowd"
6:45 P.M.-Student guild meeting.
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
Father McPhillip
William and Thompson Sts.
Sunday Masses-
8:00 - 9:30 - 11:00 - 12:00
Daily-7:00 - 8:00 - 9:00
Novena Devotions-Wednesday evenings-7:30
P.M.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw, Phone NO 2-0085
Edward H. Redman, Minister
Mr. and Mrs. G. C. Bailey, Advisor to Students
Mrs. Fay A. Kincaid, Director of Religious
Education
Miss Betsy Gidley, Organist
10 A.M.-Unitarian Adult Group--Dr. James
Graves on "Psycho-Analysis and Religion."
11 A.M.-Service of Worship. Sermon: "There Are
No Angels," by Rev. Edward H. Redman
12:05 P.M.-Coffee Hour
5 P.M.-Unitarian Youth Fellowship at 1111 White
Street
7:30 P.M.-Unitarian Student Group at the
Church

FIRST CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE
Corner Lawrence and Thayer
Phone NO 3-2139
Rev. Herbert Nation, Minister
Phone NO 2-5361
11:00 A.M.-Morning Worship.
9:45 A.M.-Sunday School
7:00 P.M.-Young People's Meeting
7:45 P.M.-Evangelistic Service.
Wednesday, 7:45 P.M.-First Revival Services.
A hearty welcome is extended to all students,
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
State and Huron Streets, Phone NO 2-2112
Wm. C. Bennett, Pastor
10:00-Sunday School
11:00-"When a Christian Sins"
6:00-Student Guild
7:30-"Daniel Speaks Today"
Wednesday 7:30 Prayer Meeting. Special speaker
-Richard E. Scheel, M.D., returned mission-
ary from Africa.
We welcome you!
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
120 South State Street
Merrill R. Abbey, Erland J. Wangdahl,
Eugene A. Ransom, Ministers
9:00 and 10:45 A.M.-Worship: "How Can We
Be Secure?" Dr. Abbey preaching.
9:30 A.M.-Student Seminar, Topic: "Major
Methodist Beliefs."
10:30 A.M.-Student Seminar, Topic, "Great Ideas
of the Bible."
5:30 P.M--Supper and Fellowship.
6:45 P.M.-Worship and Program: Movie, "Be-
yond Our Own."
Welcome to Wesley Foundation Rooms, open daily.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Saturday 4:30 to 6:00: Open House after the
Game.
Sunday at 9:30 and at 10:45: Worship services,
with sermon by the pastor, "The Miraculous in
Christianity."
Sunday at 6:00: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
Club, Supper-Program. Sound-color, "God
and the Seven Thousand Emeralds."
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER AND
CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill and Forest Avenue
Dr. H. . Yoder, Pastor
Sunday-
9:00 and 11:00 A.M.-Worship Services
10:00 A.M.-Bible Study
6:00 P.M.-Supper-Program following: Speaker,
Miss Helen Shirk, Sec. of the Foreign Mission
Board of the United Lutheran Church.
Tuesday-
7:15-8:15-"From the Bible to Our Day"-Dr.
George Mendenhall.
FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETING
Lane Hall
11:00 A.M.-Sundays. Visitors welcome.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East Huron, Phone NO 8-7332
Rev. C. H. Loucks, Minister
Beth Mahone, Asst. Student Counselor
Sunday, October 24-..
9:45-Student Class studies Second Corinthians
10:00-"Christianity Starting Point"
6:45-Ma Swe Hman of Burma will talk on
"Student Life in Burma"
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. George Barger, Minister
10:45-Morning Worship. Sermon: "Our Offen-
sive Christ"
9:45 A.M.-Church School
CONGREGATIONAL-DISCIPLES STUDENT GUILD
6:00 P.M.-Supper (reservations)
7:00 P.M.-Congregational Church, speaker-

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S T A TE

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L IB E R T Y

I

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Lady Macintosh Raincoats
as advertised in "The New Yorker"
Delightfully smart-light in weight, wind
as well as weatherproof. These coats styled
and made in England, serve admirably
for light weight toppers as well as raincoats.
.-- Y 1 .Y.1 1.1.

ST. NICHOLAS GREEK ORTHODOX
CHURCH
414 North Main
D-1 r .r:-44-A r

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