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October 16, 1954 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-10-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

III MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY. A Sft X 19.44

THE MICHIGAN DAILY ~ATTTftflAY. nr~'PnW3!u 1a~ ie~

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9

'1

'U' Exhibits
Excavations
From Egypt
(Continued from Page 1)
water finally brought about their
downfall," Peterson said. "The
people wandered away to the valley
where water was plentiful.
How were these lost cities redis-
covered? "By the nineteenth cen-
tury constant irrigation had cut
off the supply of mud which the
floods regularly deposit in the val-
ley. So the farmers went looking
for fertilizer-black dirt in this
case," he said.
"They started digging in the
F'ayoum," Peterson explained, "and
began discovering antiquities. First
they threw them away. Then they
started to sell them.
"When the news of these dis-
coveries reached the late Prof.
Frances W. Kelsey, head of classi-
cal studies and museum founder,
he was delighted. Kelsey was in-
trested in Roman history and felt
the best way to study Rome was
through Egypt, a colony that sup-
ported the empire for years," he
said.
Objects Well Preserved
Exavations in the cities of
Karanis and Dimay began in 1923
and were completed in 1935. Pet-
erson, who served in Egypt from
1925 until the expedition's end,
has since his return worked on
sorting and classifying the many
objects found. Hundreds of the an-
tiquities are on display at the
museum.
"The exciting thing about work-
ing in Egypt," Peterson said, "is
that the dry climate of the coun-
try completely preserves almost
everything. The wooden doors and
windows from the cites which we
have in the museum are almost
completely preserved. Some of the
sheets could still be used today."
Wheat Doesn't Sprout
As to the popularly believed
story about ancient wheat sprout-
ing, Peterson says, "It is complete-
ly untrue. There is recent scienti-
fic proof to place the life span of
Egyptian wheat at about 30 years.
"But it is interesting to note
that some 1,500-year-old bread
is still edible. One of my friends
tried some a few years ago. Ex-
cept that it was rather dry and
gritty, he found it just as good as
modern-day bread," Peterson add-
ed with a laugh.
Local Candidates
To Speak at Rally
Democratic and Republican
candidates for state and federal
posts will give their respective
views at a political rally schedul-
ed for Oct. 28 at Masonic Temple.
Sponsored by local CIO and AFL
groups, the rally is the only one of
its kind scheduled before election,
Nov. 2. Eight candidates, four from
each party, will deliver five-min-
ute talks.
Democratic candidates are Lewis
C. Reimann (State Senate), J.
Henry Owens (representative in
Congress), John W. Carr (State
Legislature) and Aloysius P. Min-
ick (State Legislature).
Candidates representing the
Republican party are Lewis G.
Christman (State Senate), Incum-
bent George Meader (representa-
tive in Congress), Incumbent Jo-
seph E. Warner (State Legisla-
ture) , iandGeorge W. Sallade
(State Legislature).

ACLU Note Protests Firing
Of 26 Philadelphia Teachers

A report criticizing the dismis-
sal of 26 Philadelphia teachers in
connection with House Un-Am-
┬░rican Activities Committee hear-
ings thewe has been published by
;he American Civil Liberties Un-
ion.
Dismissals on the grounds of in-
competency followed a Board of
Public Education investigation of
Communist teachers in the school
system after the House hearings.
The ACLU group wrote to Fran-
cis B. Haas, Pennsylvania Super-
intendent of Public Instruction,
protesting the "denial of fair pro-
cedures" to any citizen.
Specifies Not Asked
Some teachers accused of refusal
to answer the superintendent
were never asked any specific
questions, the report points out.
Others offered to answer, but were
turned down on the grounds of ir-
relevancy.
Main conclusions of the ACLU
report were:
1. The technical charge of in-
competency was a convenient de-
vice to dismiss teachers against
whom no real evidence of disloy-
alty was produced.
TM Faculty Night
Activities To Start
Saturday night faculty-and-
family activities at the Intramural
Sports Building begins today from
7:30 to 10 p.m.
The sports program is intended
only for faculty members and
their families and will not be op-
en to students. Children will not
be admitted without their parents.
The swimming pool will be open
during the evening and the usual
indoor sport facilities will be avail-
able.
M~edical Library
Group Meets Here
The Midwest Regional Group
mneeting of the Medical Library
Association will continue their
two-day session today in the Rack-
ham Bldg.
Sponsored by the University Me-
dical Library the group of medical
school, dental school, hospital and
pharmaceutical librarians will dis-
cuss "Recruitment and Training
of Medical Librarians."
Get Better Grades
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Order by title. Mail $1 per bk.
Print name, address on envelope.
EXAMINATION GUIDES
657 Pleasant St. Woodstock, I.
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2. All had satisfactory records.
There was no evidence that any
taught communism, slanted their
teaching or tried to convert stu-
dents or other teachers.
3. Pennsylvania law does not
provide for dismissal of teachers
because they refuse to answer
questions. The firings substitute
"government of men" for "govern-
ment of laws."
4. The teachers did not have fair
hearings and were in most cases
denied the chance to dispel doubts
),bout their loyalty,
5. Teachers should not be auto-
matically fired for invoking the
Fifth Amendment, without being
allowed to explain why they in-
voked it.

'

"CHRISTIAN SCIENCE:
the UNDERSTANDING and
PRACTICE of GOD'S ALLNESS"
is the title of a FREE LECTURE by
JULES CERN .
Member of the Board of Lectureship of the Mother Church, the
First Church of Christ, Scientist, in Boston, Massachusetts
The lecture is presented by the First Church of Christ, Scientist,
Ann Arbor and will be in the Church Auditorium.
1833 Washtenaw Avenue, Ann Arbor
Saturday Evening, October 16th, at 8:00 P.M.

Read and Use Daily Classifieds

III

U-

j

CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed Churches
of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director
Res. Ph. NO 5-4205. Office Ph. NO 8-7421
10:00 A.M.-Morning Service
7:00 P.M.-Evening Service
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, Scientist
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
9:30 A.M.-Sunday School
11:00 A.M.-Sunday Morning Service
Oct. 17-Doctrine of Atonement
8:00 P.M.-Wednesday: Testimonial Service
A free reading room is maintained at 339 South
Main Street where the Bible and all authorized
Christian Science literature may be read, bor-
rowed or purchased,
Reading Room hours are Monday, 11:00 A.M.
to 9 P.M.; Tuesday-Saturday 11:00 A.M. to
5 PM.; and Sunday 2:30 to 4:30 P.M.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 West Stadium
(Formerly at Y.M.C.A.)
Sundays-10:15 A.M., 11:00 A.M., 7:30 P.M.
Wednesdays-7:30 P.M., Bible Study, G. Wheeler
Utley, Minister
Hear: "The Herald of Truth" WXYZ-ABC Net-
work Sundays-1:00-1:30 P.M.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
AND STUDENT CENTER
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
HenryKuizenga and George Laurent, Ministers
William S. Baker and Eduard Sue, University
Pastors
9:15 A.M.-Breakfast discussion, Gospel of
Mark
9:15 and 11:00 A.M.-Morning Worship. Ser-
mon: "Trial by Love," Dr. Kuizenga preaching
6:45 P.M.-Student guild meeting. Topic: "To-
ward Community Responsibility" Rev. Russell
Williams, of Cleveland, speaker.
8:00 P.M.-Ordination service for George Laur-
ent
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
Father McPhillip
William and Thompson Sts.
Sunday Masses-
8:00 - 9:30 - 11:00 - 12:00
Daily-7:00 - 8:00 - 9:00
Novena Devotions-Wednesday evenings-7:30
P.M.
THE FIRST UNITARIAN
1917 Washtenaw, Phone NO 2-0085
Edward H. Redman, Minister
Mr. and Mrs. G. C. Bailey, Advisor to Students -
Mrs. Fay A. Kincaid, Director of Religious
Education
Miss Betsy Gidley, Organist
10 A.M.-Adult Group and Church School. Dr.
Richard Hicks continuing: "Psycho-analysis
and Religion."
11 A.M.-Service of Worship-Edward H. Red-
man preaching on: "In the Days of Justinian."
5 P.M.-Unitarian Youth Fellowship-Freshman-
Sophomore group meet at League for trans-
portation to 1111 White Street and supper-
discussion meeting.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
William and State Sts.
Minister-Rev. Leonard A. Parr
Church School for all grades at 10:45 a.m. Nurserv
for small children during the church hour.
Public worship at 10:45. Dr. Parr's sermon will be
on "The Bystanders" There is to be a Recep-
tion of new members. Following the service
there will be a coffee hour in the Mayflower
room with Mr. and Mrs. George Lewis, Prof.
and Ms. Walter Hunt, Mr. and Mrs. Walter
Springer and Dr. and Mrs. John Bradshaw as
hosts and hostesses.
At Student Guild at 7:00, Marilyn Mason Brown,
Instructor in organ will give a program, "Sacred
Music in Perspective"

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
120 South State Street
Merrill R. Abbey, Erland J. Wangdahl,
Eugene A. Ransom, Ministers
9:00 and 10:45 A.M.-Worship: "From Census
to Salvation." Dr. Abbey, peraching.
9:30 A.M.-Student Seminar, Topic "Major
Methodist Beliefs."
10:30 A.M,-Student Seminar, Topic, "Great Ideas
of the Bible."
5:30 P.M.-Supper and Fellowship.
6:45 P.M.-Worship and Program at First Bap
tist Church. President Benjamin Mays of
Morehouse College to be the speaker. Will
meet in Wesley Lounge and go as a group.
Welcome to Weslay Foundation Rooms, open daily.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 9:30 and at 10:45: Two Opportunities
for Worship, with sermon by the pastor, "Con-
tending Earnestly for the Faith."
Sunday at 6:00-Gamma Delta Lutheran Student
Club, Supper-Program. "Fireside Forum" at
6:45.
LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill and Forest Avenue
Dr. H. O. Yoder, Pastor
Sunday-
9:00 and 11:00 A.M.-Worship Services and
Holy Communion
10:00 A.M.-Bible Study-The Parables
7:00 P.M.-"The Situation of the Church Ir
Germany," Heinz Kohler, German Student.
Tuesday-
7:15-8:15 P.M.-"From the Bible to Our Day,"
Dr. George Mendenhall.
FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETING
Lane Hall
11:00 A.M.-Sundays. Visitors welcome.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East Huron, Phone NO 8-7332
Rev. C. H. Loucks, Minister
Beth Mahone, Asst. Student Counselor
Sunday, October 17-
9:45-Student Class in Guild House studies First
Corinthians
11:00-Church Worship. Sermon: "Christian In-
ter-dependence"
6:45-Guild Meeting in Guild House. President
Benjamin Mays of Morehouse College.
EVANGELICAL UNITED BRETHREN
CHURCH
Broadway at Plymouth Rd.
10:00 A.M.-Sunday School
11:00 A.M.-Morning Worship
7:30 P.M.-Evening Service
R. L. Lewis, Minister, Phone NO 3-4061
ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT FOUNDATION
306 North Division St.
Sunday Services at 8, 9, 11 A.M., and 8 P.M.
Lectures on The Faith of the Church at 4:30 P.M.
Supper Club at 6:30 P.M.

Top Off Your Evenings
at the
MILK MAID DRIVE-INN
RESTAURANT
Open 11 A.M. - 12:30 P.M.
3730 Washtenaw Near Pittsfield Village
ORDERS TO GO - NO 8-7146

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FIRST CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE
Corner Lawrence and Thayer
Phone NO 3-2139
Rev. Herbert Nation, Minister
Phone NO 2-5361
11:00 A.M.-Morning Worship.
9:45 A.M.-Sunday School
7:00 P.M.--Young People's Meeting
7:45 P.M.-Evangelistic Service.
WJcneo. 7:45 P.M.-Prover Meeting.

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I

11

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