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September 15, 1954 - Image 26

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-09-15

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, I954

T..M.IG N ALYWENSD..SPTMBR15.15

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ORGAN 7ATIONS SET HIGH STANDARDS:

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thini's xx

onoraries Recognize Campus Leaders)

Women's Athletic Association, Union
Co-Sponsor Michigras, Spring Weekend
University Charity Projects Scheduled for Alternate Years;
Carnival Atmosphere, Student, Faculty Performances Featured

in ohd Wesh word meaning "pro- the League of Women Voters,
teng dragon.' The symbol for raised money for books to com-
y membership is a gold pin in the plete the Alice Crocker Lloyd Dra-
ns->f rA in- url r ound rl Ctn' llptinn in the LPA LP'nnaT i

se nckr ai e eno uw
erhi adprciarinamu
eommou. e en iUgop
a cetan pa fa ol1
Thyal , tao~t i ays~

t ter W". barary and has helped to- sponsor
Tapng usually takes place in SL movies. In addition, the Mortar-
S n Tie members are board's members raise money for
dre i b n skirts and yel- a $100 scholarship fund to be a-
swears, as they wander warded to an outstanding' junior
h the corridors and rooms woman.
o do s and sorority houses, The members wear a pin to
g their traditional chant, distinguish them. This pin is a
mn danm, damn to Michigau- black and gold mortarboard.
ie members are chosen Senior Society
bsis of seho1arship, camp- The Senior Society is a local
u ctiviies, aand leadership. honorary for independent women.
e C W -ynS hperform manyrw The new members are selected as
ic es to ut the year which examples of those who have shown
e ing votes at election leadership ability, participated in
an oney for a scholar- campus activities and maintained
sl fn a presenting record a high scholastic average.
The new members are dressed
rtarboard in white collars, as they walk
ThMrtboard Society, nation- through the Michigan campus sing-
for all senior women ing their traiditional song "In and
e their n e w ' members on out the halls we wander......",
of service, scholarship After each new member is re-
S egistered, they receive a yellow
Th eent Mortarboard mem- rose and the Senior Society pin,
Sd black caps and which is a black rectangle with
he unior members. two gold S's placed one over the
cosen members must other.
rortarboards the fol- The group works on such pro-
d everywhere they go. jects as counting votes during the
Tse of the society is SL elections, manning election
e campus by perform- booths and , selling 'Ensians and
ng certain activities. The group boutonnaires for the Assembly Ball.
has worked in the Student-Faculty Scroll )
L-ng e, aided the local chapter of Another local honorary for seni-

or women is Scroll, a local society
for affiliated coeds, who are tapped
on the basis of leadership, charac-
ter and service.
The new members must bike
through the campus, wearing black
robes. .As each member is tapped,
she receives a cardboard scroll
which she mtist wear around her
neck the following day. At the
initiation at the League, the mem-
bers receives a necklace with a
small gold scroll on it.
This organization raises money
from the sale of "Michigan Alum-
nus" magazines and the Scroll
Jazz concerts in order to finance
a $100 scholarship for an affiliated
junior woman.
Michigamua
There are several honorary so-
cieties which pay tribute to the
outstanding men of Michigan. One
of the very highest and most select
is the honorary for senior men,
Michigamua. This society was writ-
ten up in the June 7, 1954 issue of
Life magazine which described the
tapping and initiation ritual.
Covered with war paint and
eagle feathers, the Michigamuans
dragged the new members out of
bed, dumped them on the lawn,
stripped them, doused them with
beer by the light of kerosene fires,
where the candidates were ad-
jured to "beum, damn humble"
and left with a birchbark of in-
structions.

er or wo o -,
Ther> _'. w .... .
onahoa
folx' e bya ho W

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After that the candidates had to
go through several days of initia-
tion procedures. The Michigamuans
get together once a week to dis-
cuss campus problems.
Druids
The Druids, another men's honor-
rary, honors senior men who are
outstanding in various campus act-
ivities. The new members are
chosen from the senior class or!
from members of the junior class
who will be seniors the following
fall.
The apping begins at night when
the older members quietly spirit
out the prospective members and
take them to a secret place where
certain rituals are performed.
The following day on the' Diagonal,
the new Druids perform certain
public demonstrations to symbol-
ize their loyalty to the society.
The ceremony terminates around
the Druid rock near the site of
the old Haven Hall.
Several days later, a banquet
and secret initiation are held for
new members. The men receive a
Druid pin of a sickle and a serpent
at the initiation ceremony.
The Druids have worked together
to sponsor parties at the Michigan
Children's Institute. They have al-
so worked with the Salvation Army
and the Dunbar Community Cetner.
Sphinx
The honorary which recognizes
outstanding Junior men is Sphinx.
This honorary acquired the name
Sphinx from the great Egyptian
monument of tlat name. It sig-
nifies the qualities of wisdom and
silence which the Sphinx embod-
ies.
The traditional tapping ceremony
is held on the lawn of the new
member's residence the night he
is tapped. On that night, the can-
didates are dragged out of bed,
carried outside, drenched with
water while the Pharoah reads a
proclamation concerning the ritual
of the River Nile. The following
day the candidates perform a de-
monstration in front of the library
in which they must publicly "swim
the Nile."
Later a formal initiation is held
which is followed by a banquet.
The new members are then pre-
sented with a gold pin on which
there is a sphinx head.
Sphinx holds meetings every two
weeks in order to bring the men
together and to provide time to
discuss problems. This society has
held parties at the University Hos-
pital. They have also worked on

Everyone from eight to 80 loves
a carnival or a parade.
Combine the two and the result
is Michigras, one of the biggest
and most gala weekends at the
University, which takes place ev-
ery two years.
There is fun and entertainment
for everyone on this weekend,
sponsored by the Women's Athletic
Association and the Men's Union

at Yost Field House. All proceeds
go to charity.
"Michiworm"
This year's Michigras depicted
the reading habits of the "Michi-
worm." Thirty-three floats parti-
cipated in the Michigras Parade,
which wound its way through the
streets of Ann Arbor. The parade
was televised and throngs of people
lined the streets to view it.

In accordance with the theme
of "Life's a Book," four divisions
were used. In the "pre-school" di-
vision were floats representing
spch books as "Pinocchio" and
"The Wizard of Oz."
The "grade school" division had
such books as "Moby Dick" and
"The Silver Skates." "Poe's Tales"
and "Monster Rally" were in the
high school division, while the adult
class had such floats as "Knock
on Any Door" and "War and
Peace."
The parade also included six
high school bands along with the
Michigan Marching Band, four cur-
rent sports cars, the Plymouth
Kiltie Band with the Dancing Las-
sies and an old fire enginle.
Booths
Preparation for Michigras, which
dates back to 1901, begins with
competition among campus organi-
zations for allotted space for booths
in the Field House. These feature
horror shows, skits, rides and re-
freshment concessions.
Trophies for these booths are
divided into three divisions: show
booths, refreshments and games
of skill.
In 1952 the theme was "Fifty
Years at Michigan," in honor of
the 50th anniversary of Michigras.
At this time the small beginning
of the University up to recent times
were depicted, and its many tra-
ditions were illustrated.
The parade included a Scholar
Ship, Prohibition Speakeasy and a
Keystone Cop chase,

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The society hn m - 'or w ,m-
a is callod the Wyvertn Hon-r

----- -------- - - - -- -- -----------

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.

"MICHIGRAS MADNESS"-This scene from the 1952 production
of Michigras was broadcast over a television network. Teams of
two housing groups worked on floats for the huge parade and
booths for the carnival in Yost Field House. Last year Michigras
was held April 23 and 24.

x

the J-Hop and on other campus
activities.
Vulcans
There are two societies which
honor outstanding men in the En-
gineering School. The Vulcans
honor the senior men and the Tri-
angles honor the outstanding junior
men. These honoraries tap their
new candidates, and hold informal
and formal initiations according
to the traditions of their society.
Triangles
For example, the new members
of the Triangles are blind folded
and driven away from the campus.
Then they are left to walk back
to campus. The purpose of this
is to enable the new members to
become better acquainted with
each other.
Each society has its own pin
which all the new members re-
ceive. The members are chosen
on the basis of activities and on
an acceptable scholastic average.
The main purposes of these two
honoraries are to perform services
4nd to promote the interest of the
University 'and the Engineering
School.
These are just a few of the
honoraries which serve to recog-
nize the earnest efforts of the stud-
ents of the University.

Skit Night, Derby-Run
Highlight 'U' Weekend

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USED BOOKS
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BARGAIN PRICES

Skit Night, sponsored by the
Women's Athletic Association and
Men's Union was presented as a
part of their Spring Weekend pro-
ject for the first time in 1952.
Six groups were selected on the
basis of scenerios, submitted to a
skit committee, to participate.
Each group was composed of a
men's and a women's residence
house.
Proceeds for the show were do-
nated to charity. The Union pre-
sented its share of the profits to
the Damon Runyan Cancer Fund,
while the WAA gave its mart to
the Phoenix Project.
Variety of Skits
The skits showed a variety of
subjects. Winners were Gamma
Phi Beta and Sigma Phi Epsilon,
who pantomined the well-known
poem, "The Face on the Barroom
Floor."
Other skits included head-hunt-
ing Amazons in an "African Safa-

U"' 1 11 l p .,
,.. , . a ,n .,_ r ns_ . a.e,_ .

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ri," a "typical" freshman's life
in "Little Lord Flunkeroy," a take-
off on television programs in the
"Happy Medium," an interpreta-
tion of the opera "Die Valkyrie,"-
' and a new version of "HMS Pina-
fore"-"MSC Pinafore."
Three faculty members joined
in the fun by presenting a short
skit and a juggling act.
Skit Night is part of the new
Spring Weekend project which will
replace such events as Tennis Ball
and Winter Carnival. The com-
mittee hopes to alternate it with
Michigras every other year.
"Wolverun Derby"
Also featured during the week-
end was the second "Wolverun
Derby." Men's and Women's resi-
dences went together in building
soap box derby racers. A women's
housing group ma'y enter a racer
only if they have a male driver.
Prizes and trophies are award-
ed the cars reaching the finish line
in the fastest time, or for reaching
th'e finish line at all. Judged on
the basis 'of workmanship, origin-
ality and make of the car, a-
wards are given for the best look-
ing racer.
The best dressed driver com-
peting in the race is also awarded
a prize.
A $2 entry fee is charged for
each car, and any group may enter
as many cars as it wishes. Racers
must clear the road by at least
three inches and not be over 45
inches in height.
Weight must not be over 200
pounds and when loaded cannot
exceed 375 pounds.

-i

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at the University we extend a hearty welcome, and a cor-
d van to r-ae Goodyear's your home store, as do so many upperclassmen.
Having b in Ann Arbor since 1888, we are old hands at serving University stu-
d oILl find the lates t fashions in Ready-to-Wear, Sportswear, Shoes, Ac-
Ces iesand oI tric\ at our downtown store at 124 S. Main Street.
)(N iG RosI and SNACK BAR at 215 S.
0 itrect. Annex have a delightful atmosphere, where
yh cicest foods are served . . . Breakfasts, Lmnch-
T Ue£e ff7am/s nami1,lie prodc/s are avaiable at Good year's:

i,
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3
M
" #

A 4

INDIA ART SH.OP
IMPORTERS
330 MAYNARD STREET

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fr0 PERSIAN PRINTS
fr' BED SPREADS
t DRAPES

o' WALL 'HANGINGS
o JEWELRY
fr' GIFTS

Daily
Classifieds

fr' JAPANESE PRINTS

Bring
Results

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_ __ _ ____ _ ® ._____-___ .___-._-,- ..--- -

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AL M 01:1 ';1 N 1 II!A U(1A1
i A V 0) (,l(VSTAT.
,51111' 'N\,SIIORT
yBh1i ,! jC1T
A o I V I IV

HARVEY BERIN
PAUL PARNES
IIANDM ACII LR.
FRANK GALLANT
IRVANA
CRAIGLEIGJH
KtIMBERLY
DAVONSHIR
SIDNEY HELLER
LEvI
VASSAR
r AVK -

14

Business and
Secretarial Training,
ACCOUNTING -TYPING
BUSINESS MACHINES
CL-JID TLJ A I CDITBf\A/RITIKl;

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