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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 15, 1954 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-10-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Ir Svc

THE MCHIGAN DAILY

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~K SX T E M CHI AN D TI~' _____________________________________________ J.LAa t1.t i DjE i1, L954

4

TURN IN AND

lIRWni6 e;ls.atdb

Rain

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DRIVE THRU
NO PARKING PROBLEMS

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4

"

KEG BEER
ICE CUBES
SOFT DRINKS

Smith Name
To Manager
PHILADELPHIA OP)-The Phil-
adelphia Phillies dipped into the
minor leagues-and for the fourth
time to the New York Yankee or-
ganization-yesterday and tapped
lean, greying Mayo Smith to lead
the National League ball club in
1955.
The 39-year-old, mild-manner-
ed Smith was introduced to a
gasping group of newspapermen,
radio and television reporters at
a specially summoned news con-
ference. When he walked into the
room with General Manager Roy

1 1, E. William St. Between Main and Fourth
PHONE NO 8-7191
Open 10 A.M. to 12 P.M., Sunday Noon to 7 P.M.

J

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91

Ank iTUUEIMIIT DIRECTORY

d by Phillies
ial Position
Hamey, Smith was a complete
stranger to the 50 waiting there.
Hamey, the last Yankee employe
y join the Phillies, said Smith
was named to succeed Terry
Moore, the former St. Louis Car-
dinals ball hawk, necause the Phil-
lies wanted an "experienced"
manager. Smith has managed for
six years in minor league ball,
ranging from class D to AA.
Hamey said Moore was released.
after a half-season tenure at the
head of the Phillies because he
was "inexperienced."
Smith was born in New London,
Mo., in. 1915 and 10 years later his
family moved to Lakeworth, Fla.,
where he learned to play baseball.
In 1933 he was signed by Dan How-
ley and went to Toronto of the
International League. From 19341
to 1936 he played for Wilmington,
N.C., of the Piedmont League.
A left-handed hitter, he startedl
out playing third base but switched
to theoutfield. For the next seven
years he was with the Buffalo Bi-
sons of the International League
and in 1945 played briefly with the
Philadelphia Athletics.
SOCK NEWS!
For Men who find
NYLON hard on
their feet.
dockeqC@
Brand
FEATURE SOCKS

RON WALLINGFORD
*. .runs against Irish
'' Cross-Country
Runners Face ND
Coach Don Canham will take his
cross-country squad to South Bend
tomorrow where the Wolverine
thinclads will take on the Irish in
a dual meet.
Although not a varsity sport,
cross-country provides track men
with a conditioning season in the
fall. Canham said that none of
his men would be entered in the
Big Ten cross-country meet this
year.

Sigma Chi Takes Early Lead
In Fraternity Track Contest
Shields, Lawrence Cop Shot Put, Pole Vault;
Becker and Schlicht Tie for High Jump Title

By HAP ATHERTON
Rain and muddy weather caus-
ed the postponement of the run-
ning events in the annual intra-
mural Track Meet, yesterday, but
the social fraternty~ field events
were held as planned in Yost Field
House.
Sigma Chi jumped into an unof-
ficial lead in the track meet with
twelve points, leading Phi Delta
Theta which posted eight and one-
quarter points.
The high jump event found two
Sigma Chi's, Bob Becker and Leo
Schlicht, with 5 foot 10 inch
leaps, tied for first, providing eight
of the points. Schlicht put on a
tremendous display of jumping
ability as he knocked the bar down
only once, at the 5 foot 10 inch
level, but was successful in his
next leap to clear the mark.
Becker Comes from Behind
Becker had to come from behind
at the 5 foot 4 inch and 5 foot
8 inch heights to earn the tie. He
had knocked the bar down twice
at each level, but came back on his
third and last tries to clear it.

on sale

Four men, Andy Samosuk of Phi
Delta Theta, Theta Xi's Jack
Burchfield, Chi Psi's Art Fair-
banks, and Dick Neil, tied for third
in the event, all clearing the bar
at 5 foot 8 inches,
Doug Lawrence gave the Phi
Delta Thetas an easy five points in
the pole vault. He cleared the bar
at 11 feet to lead his nearest op-
ponent by a foot and a half,
Cross, Cautro Tie
Jack Cross of Theta Chi, and
Don Cautro, another Phi Delta
Theta, passed the 9 foot 6 inch
mark to tie for second. Alpha Tau
Omega's Charles Gunn vaulted the
bar at 9 feet to cop fourth place.,
Fairbanks made a great 19 foot
6/4 inch leap on his second at-
tempt to capture first in the broad
jump. Theta Chi's Bob McKenzie
jumped 19 feet on two occasions,
good for second place. Mike Ka-
dens of Zeta Beta Tau was right
behind McKenzie on an 18 foot 9
inch jump. Fred Newman, leaping
for Sigma Chi, placed fourth with
a leap of 18 feet 1/2 inch.
With first place 4lready in the
bag in the shot put event, Sigma
Phi Epsilon's Ken Shields put the
shot 41 feet 51/4 inches to better
his own mark of 41 feet 4/2 inches,
previous high mark among the con-
testants. Sigma Chi's Leo Schlicht
hurled the 12 pound ball 40 feet
61/2 inches, previous high mark
among the contestants. Sigma
Chi's Leo Schlicht hurled the 12
pound ball 40 feet 6% inches for
a close second. Sikma Phi Epsilon's
Jim Martin and Chi Psi's Ji Nick-
elson captured third and fourth
places, respectively, after putting
the shot down 37 feet 1 inches
and 36 feet 10% inches from the
circle.

Phi Delta Phi
Crushes Psi
Omega, 33-0
Phi Chi Wins on Last
Second Scoring Pass
Water enough to turn most of
the intramural football fields into
wading ponds last night proved
to be not quite enough of a haz-
ard to stop Phi Delta Phi as it
marched over Psi Omega in the
pro fraternity league, 33=0.
Dave Ray started the scoring
for the winners early in the first
half when he connected with Roug
Ray on a TD pass. A few moments
later Ray again passed to Cutler
who in turn tossed a scoring pass
to Bill Cassebaum.
Phi Chi scored on the last play
of the game to top the Law Club,
'6-0, in a bitterly, fought contest in
e ud. Bull Lukash threw a des-
peration 30 yard pass to John
Fushman in the end zone for the
tie breaking score.
Phi Delta Epsilon Wins
In a protested battle, Phi Delta
Epsilon downed Alpha Kappa Kap-
pa, 13-7. Fred. Horowitz ran the
opening kickoff 50 yards down the
left sideline for the first score for
the winners. In the second half
he took in a pass from Henry Gur-
alnick for the other TD.
John Hess sparked the Nu Sigma
,Nu team to a 21-0 victory over Del-
ta Theta Phi. Hess tossed two
touchdown passes to Tad Stanford,
and one to Chris Christensen for
the scores.
Phi Rho Sigma easily brushed
aside Al Kappa, Psi, 19-2. eGorge
Steel tossed scoring passes to Jack
Ison and Al Allie for two tallies,
and Ison added another on a pass
to Roy Correa.
Phi Alpha Kappa out-distanced
Phi Alpha Delta in overtime to
win a bitterly contested game that
ended- in a tie, 1-0.

WE D

OCT.

20

8 -.M

Confusion Develops Over Sale
Of Athletics; Mack Undecided.

i

Over 18,000 Names, Addresses,
and Telephone Numbers

PHILADELPHIA (M-The status
of the Philadelphia Athletics fran-
chise last night was a lot like the
nursery rhyme-button, button,
who's got the button.
Arnold Johnson, Chicago real es-
tate man, said he was all but
signed - sealed - and - delivered
owner of the ball club with inten-
tions of moving it to Kansas City.
Roy Mack, executive vice presi-
dent of the A's, said that wasn't
quite so. Mack said he hadn't
agreed in so many words at an
American League meeting in Chi-
cago Tuesday to sell his interest
in the team.
Were not the Biggest.
But ask your Buddy
He will tell you who's the Best.
6 EXPERTS TO SERVE YOU
74 f tN. Uv6eiy
715 N. University

Will Harridge, president of the
American League, said it was his
impression the loop had taken up
"and disposed of" the sale of the
club to Johnson with Mack given
until 10 a.m. (CST) next Monday
to make up his mind for good and
all.
However, Harridge added, while
the league made the way clear
for Mack to sell, there is no way
the league can force him to do
that. Harridge summed the situa-
tion up this way:
"There is nothing further to say.
We just have to sit and wait."
Mack surprised just abont ev-
eryone Thursday by issuing a
statement in which he denied he
had reached the actual point )f
selling out. Quite the contrary, he
said he still retains some hope of
keeping the team in the city where
the dynasty founded by his father
had fielded a Major League team
for more than a half century.

F,

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Revised Front Section with
a Student Organizations Listing

'9

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Bythe
House of
Here are long-wearing Nylons
that you can enjoy without
any of the "hot-foot" discom-
fort of ordinary Nylon. Ab-
sorbo treated socks absorb
perspiration and keep your
feet dry and comfortable.
More absorbent than wool!
Come in and get several pair
today.

An Enlarged Yellow Page
"Classified" Section

HARBERT'S MARKET
121 7 Prospect - North of Wells
SUNDAY MORNING SPECIAL
Bagels, onion rolls, bread, sweet rolls-from
Epstein Bakery
KOSHER salami, lox, herring
NO 2-9844
There s One Whale Of
They ore the originot waterproof' suickeri
made of soft genuine oilskin (not plostic, fea.
turing solid brass snaps, jumbo patch pockets
and Standard's own "captivating colors.
StANDARD YELLOW SKY BLUE
RED!PINK
NAVY SHINY $lAC"
JM4so and Junior Sizeo....About $10.9
Cloche or Sou'wester ...........About $ 1.9
"WOerproof! (Not Merely Water Repellent)
At your favorite store in town.'<<
Write for free color chart.
STANDARD OILED CLOTHING .COi. Ic.
810 East 152nd St. New York 55, N. Y. :

$100

pair

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"Michigan Men"!
Your Best Date Book on Campus

Walk a few steps
and save dollars
KUOHNS
217 E. Liberty
Phone NO 8-8020
Open Monday evening
till 9:00 P.M.

I

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Newest for Fall-
the Tab Collar i
II
The Tab Collar has always been popu- "
lar with meticulous dressers. And it is 4:{
truly coming into its own this season ::..""..:
with the trend toward smaller neck-
tie knots and the 'Edwardian Touch,.
We now have a fine selecion of Tabs
in white and striped broadcloths.
from 5.95

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ARE THE BEST
YOUR MONEY CAN BUY
Whether you select *the lowest or
the highest priced SAFFELL & Busm
Suit or Outercoat, you receive the
same exacting precision in fit, the
same smartness of styling, the same
measure of good taste. Our SAFFELL
& Busi. tailors make only good
clothes . . . clothes that are a credit
to you and that give you satisfaction
far beyond others. They cost a little
more but what a difference those few
dollars make. Stop in and ask to see
a SAFFELL & BUSH .. .

J,

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CHARCOAL SUITS
IN BLACK OR BROWN
by

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$350
MANHATTAN SHIRTS
ADAM HATS
FREEMAN SHOES
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KHAKI - GREY - FOREST GREEN
1Anfv,10 A LITC

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1111

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