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October 12, 1954 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-10-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

P ACEM

TilE MCHIIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1954

FOR 1800 STUDENTS:
Construction of New High School Begun

By RONA FRIEDMAN
A tangible result of much work
and planning, the new Ann Arbor
senior high school is gradually tak-
ing shape in the Stadium Hills
area.
Costing approximately six and a
half million dollars, the new school
will be ready to open in 1956, ac-
cording to Jack Elzay, Superin-
tendent of Schools.
Relieve Conditions
It will replace the old Ann Arbor
High School located on S. State,
which Elzay pointed out, is terribly
overcrowded. Built for 1,100 stu-
dents, the school now houses 1,400.
Some of the teachers have their
desks out in the halls, Elzay com-
mented.
Planned by the Cleveland archi-
tecture firm of Fulton Krinsky and
Dela Motte, the modern building
will comfortably hold 1800 students
and with additional classrooms
could facilitate 2,400. An enroll-
ment of approximately 1,500 stu-
dents is expected by 1956, Elzay
said.
The Board of Education bought
the Stadium Hills area from the
University for $250,000. The agree-
ment that it reached included the
transfer of Wines field from Ann
Arbor High School to the Univer-
sity for $115,000. Also Ann Arbor
High School agreed to park 5,000
cars on the Stadium Hills area
during football games.
'U' Uses
Another stipulation of the agree-
ment was that the University be
Senior Pictures
Senior picture appointments may
be made this week for all seniors
who have failed to sign up for
'Ensian pictures, or have missed
previously scheduled appointments.
Appointments may be made on
the Diag from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
today, or from 8 p.m. to 5 p.m.
daily in the Student Publications
Building.

Rushing Nets
Fraternities
515 Pledges
(Continued on Page 5)
born, '58; John H. Vise, '57; Frank
A. Willette,'58; Duane Willse, '58E.
THETA DELTA CHI: William
H. Armstrong, '59E; Frank Hop-
kins Duffy, '59E; John L. Etter,
'58; Donald A. Meier, '58; David
Peter Trautman, '58A&D; Con-
rad J. Van Tienhoven, '58.
THETA XI: Raymond Ward Bis-
sell, '58; Charles W. Carter, '58;
Michael D. Flynn, '57; Richard M.
Ham, '58; Frederick D. Harris,
'58E; Irwin A. Hicks, '58E; Wil-
liam F. Ichman, '58E; John R.
Peoples, '58E; Charles C. Wilson,
'58E.
TRIANGLE: George Rassweiler,
'58; Fred W. Zinger, '58.
ZETA BETA TAU: Michael I.
Cohen, '58; Jay S. Colen, '57; Kren
L. Connart, '58; Morton H. Dub-
now, '58; Michael B. Gordon, '58;
Richard D. Grauer, '58E; John A.
Harris, '58; Samuel R. Harris,
'58; Michael H. Jacobson, '58;
Thomas I. Klein, '58; Alan S. Kon-
op, '58; Charles Kriser, '58; John
A. Leslie, '58; Leslie M. Rodney,
'58; Thomas J. Lewy, '58; John J.
Macht, '58; Bernard Maza, '58;
James D. Meyers, '58; Mark Mel-
et, '58; Howard Ringel, '58; Steph-
an Rykoff, '58; Eugene R. Schiff,
'58; Robert Segar, '57; Ronald
Shorr, '58.
ZETA PSI: Peter L. Brechin-
man, '58; Carleton A. Heist, '58;
William Wiard, '58E; Larwrence
A. Wagner, '58E; Donald J. Way,'
'57E; Maurice R. Ramsey, Jr., 158E;
Stuart R. Allen, '58E; Bruce D.
Campbell, '58E; Henry M. Schaaf-
sma, '58; Nicholas Wassil; '58E;
John W. Hillver, '58.

TOTAL NUMBER DECREASES:
Plumbing Officer Says
No 'Flood' of Complaints

CYCLISTS! /eie% (4 feu.
A New 72-Page Cycling Handbook and Catalogue!!!

By JOEL BERGER
Stating t h a t complaints on
plumbing violations in apartment
dwellings often run in cycles, Ann
Arbor's Chief Plumbing Inspector
Fred E. Bauer said yesterday that
his department has been averaging
about two complaints per month
recently.
Number of complaints by stu-
dent residents in off-campus dwell-
ings has dropped considerably
since the great influx of students
here immediately following World
War II, he said.
Lived By Coal Bin
At that time, many violations
and complaints were centered
around sub-legal bathrooms. Bauer
received one complaint concerning
a basement apartment next to a
coal bin. Coal sifted across the
student's floor and under his bed.
During the past two or three
years, however, plumbing viola-
tions have been on the decrease,
Bauer said. Many apartment
houses and new dwellings have
been built in the past few years,
making it possible for University
students and others to find better
rooming accommodations.
Only off-campus housing and Ann
Arbor residences, and buildings
within a one-mile radius of the
city, are inspected by Bauer and
his assistant, he said.
University property is inspected
by the University's own plumb-

ing inspector, Bauer commented,
Under an agreement between City
Council and the University, he con-
tinued, Ann Arbor is paid $75 an-
nually for a permit allowing the
University to inspect its own prop-
erty for plumbing violations.
The city plumbing inspector re-
ceives monthly reports from the
University, 'Bauer said. Buildings
checked by the University inspec-
tor include all campus structures
and dormitories, in addition to the
stadium, Ferry Field and other
buildings.
Working under a new building
inspection setup, all complaints on
plumbing are turned into the city
health department, Bauer said.
His department has not had the
time to make a systematic check
of dwellings to see if sub-standard
conditions exist, Bauer comment-
ed. The only inspections which are
made follow complaints by resi-
dents or alterations to an existing
structure, in addition to the check-
ing of plans for new buildings.
Many violations are possible, he
said. The most common occurs in
new construction or alterations of
existing buildings when cross-con-
nections of pipes from water clos-
ets enable unsanitary water to
drain back into the water supply.
Bad water pipes cause still an-
other violation. They, are respon-
sible for sewer gas leaking back
into the home.

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allowed first option to buy the old
high school on State St. when the
Board of Education is ready to
sell the building.
"The University is seriously
studying the possible uses of the
building," Wilbur K. Pierpont, Uni-
versity vice-president, commented.
"However no decision has been
made yet."
Costs for the new school have
fluctuated since its conception. Or-
iginally estimated at four and a
half million dollars, the cost of
the school rose along with the ris-
ing price of materials. In Feb.
1952 the estimation reached nine
million dollars.
Go Ahead
Finally in Feb. 1954, the Board
voted 7 to 1, to go ahead with a
budget of $6,286,557 which was
$380,808 more than the amount in
the building fund.
The roomy modern building will
not only include space for all types
of athletic and shop activities but
will have a swimming pool, the-

ater and radio station from which
students will be able to give live
broadcasts through local stations.
Originally the Board of Educa-
tion in unprecedented action, asked
the community what it wanted in
the new school. Twenty communi-
ty leaders met at Haven Hall
Lodge near Pontiac, in April 1950,
and discussed what they felt the
school program should include.
Previously plans for the 210 acre
Stadium Hills site included the
construction of an elementary
school. The idea has not been
abandoned, said Elzay, but just
postponed to a future date.
When the staff and students of
Ann Arbor High School move to
the new building, the parking prob-
lem on State and surrounding
streets should be alleviated, Elzay
pointed out.

I

FOOTBALL WEEKEND

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Detroit Area Study Probes
Problems of American Family.

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By DEBRA DURCHSLAG
What is happening to the Ameri-
can family?
Is the increased divorce rate an
indication of disorganization, or
has the family group simply been
extended to a kinship group? These
and other questions about the ur-
ban family are the subject of this
year's Detroit Area Study.
Many recent sociological inter-
pretations of the family have seen
it as an institution on the road to
at least temporary collapse, chang-
ing from institution to companion-
ship. However, there has been lit-
tle research data on the problem.
Connecticut Survey
Last year's Detroit Area Study
came up with the unexpected evi-
dence that Detroiters associate
most frequently with relatives.
These results along with P. New Ha-
ven, Conn. study suggested that
the family structure has merely
changed, not disintegrated.
With the purpose of describing
the change, the present Detroit
project has been set up. A sample
will be made of the entire metro-
politan area according to the Sur-
vey Research Center's "random
sampling" method. Follow-up re-
search projects with farm families
and Japanese and Greek families
are under consideration.
Morris Axelrod, who is the most
recent addition to the Survey Re-

search Center's directional staff
and Prof. Robert O. Blood of the
sociology department have de-
signed the project in an attempt
to gather field information on the
family.
Three Objectives
The Detroit Area Study was set
up in 1951 with the three-fold ob-
jective of providing research fa-
cilities, practical training and so-
cial information. It is financed by
the Ford Foundation as a perma-
nent study, but operates in co-op-
eration with the sociology depart-
ment and the Survey Research
Center.
Axelrod, who has been with the
Study since its beginning as an as-
sistant to Prof. Ronald Freedman
of the sociology department, says
that the projects have been quite
a success.
He added that the Area study,
unique in its combination of ob-
jectives, is a practical way of in-
troducing students to wide-scale re-
search.
New Work
Axelrod's new job will concen-
trate on the interviewing process
which is the core of most Survey
Research Center projects. Having
worked at the center since 1946
when he was getting his doctorate,
he has been coder, assistant study
director and study director, work-
ing mainly on the Human Rela-
tions program and in Economic
Behavior.
In the new position he will assist
Charles Cannell, head of the Cen-
ter's Field Staff, and do research
on the psychology of the interview.

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