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October 10, 1954 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-10-10

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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1954

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

IPAVM 9MMWW

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1954 A W~U' '3YVThW5W~
THE MJCUTGA~ nATTY

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urdueDuke Fight to 13-13 Tie

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The Morning After
... by HANLEY GURWIN
Forest Evashevski, the man who was going to lead his Iowa
Hawkeyes to a resounding victory over Michigan yesterday afternoon,
was sitting quietly in the corner of the dressing room still somewhat
shocked at the outcome of the game.
Reporters and old friends came up to him with the post-game
comments appropriate for the occasion. "Tough one to lose Evy, but
you're not out of it yet. There are still five games left on the schedule.
I guess the boys ran into a little more than they were expecting."
Evashevski managed to smile, and though understandably dis-
appointed at the all-too-familiar final score, offered no excuses as he
praised ,the Wolverine's marvelous showing. "Michigan deserved to
win. I have nothing but admiration for a team that can come back
the way they did"
In comparing yesterday's game to last 'year's squeaker, Iowa's
coach commented that he is not nearly as disappointed now as he
was last year at this time. "Last year I felt that we deserved to win.
This time we were outplayed."
When we asked what he thought the turning point of the game
was, he replied that he didn't know for sure. "There were a couple
of turning points," he answered. "Kramer's touchdown catch of the
pass or our failure to score in the closing minutes of the first half ...
either one might be called the turning point."
As could be expected, the gloom which prevailed in the Iowa lock-
er room was notably contrasted across the alley-way in the Michigan
camp with the joyous shouts that accompany a well earned victory.
Athletic Director "Fritz" Crisler and head coach Bennie Ooster-
baan, undeniably more than satisfied with the Wolverine's perform-
ance, smiled broadly. Crisler commented that the way Michigan got
up off the floor was an amazing thing. "They had desire and courage.
It was a great game," said the former Michigan head coach.
Considering what Michigan had to do to win it, calling the game
anything less than great would be an understatement. For seven min-
utes the Wolverines had everyone in the stands convinced that last
week's futile effort against Army was no fluke. It looked as though
it might be the worst route a Michigan team had suffered in years.
The Wolverines fumbled on the opening kick-off and a few min-
utes later were behind 6-0. They received another kick-off, fumbled
again a fete plays later and once more had lost the ball. After failing
to recover an Iowa fumble, the Michigan line seemed to be just going
through the motions as the Hawkeyes tallied again.
Up in the pressbox, the statisticians started looking through the
r record books to see what pages might have to be rewritten. They con-
tinued to look while the Wolverines under the direction of their new
hero, Jim Maddock, began a goalward march.
The record books were forgotten though when Michigan scored
and then went ahead for keeps midway through the second period.
'Throughout the second half, as the inspired Wolverines out-charged
their highly-touted foes, the excitement that naturally evolves from
the sensing of an upset grew to amazing proportions.
The interception of an Iowa pass by Fred Baer with about 30
seconds to go climaxed the afternoon of football and immediately set
the fans buzzing over who was responsible for the great upset.
They talked about Maddock, who- called a great game from the
single wing. They mentioned Ron Kramer, whose great catch and ex-
tra points gave Michigan the victory margin. They spoke of Ed Hick-
ey's great running, of Jim Bate's, who was back in the lineup for the
first time in two years, great linebacking, of Dave Hill, of Baer, of
the entire Michigan line.

OSU Mauls
Illini, 40w7;
Watkins Star
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. UP)-Unbeat-
en Ohio State, riding on the fleet
heels of Bobby Watkins, mauled
inept Illinois, 40-7, yesterday to
become a bristling Big Ten foot-
ball title contender.
Watkins scored twice as five
Buckeyes produced touchdowns,
for Ohio State's second Conference
victory and third of the season.
The Buckeyes struck for an
opening, touchdown on Watkins'
41-yard ;run when the game was
about ten minutes old, rolled to a
21-0 halftime advantage and toyed
with the outclassed Illini in the
in the closing half.
Halfback J. C. Caroline, who last
season shocked Ohio State with
192 yards rushing and two touch-
downs in a 41-20 upset, was sha-
ckled until the opening minutes of
the fourth period when he romped
41 yards with a pass interception
for the only Illini touchdown.
Sophomore fullback Hubert Bo-
bo slashed three yards for the
second Buckeye touchdown late in
the second period.
Watkins' second touchdown came
on a three-yard slash to give Ohio
State a 21-0 halftime margin. Two
more Buckeye touchdowns rolled
across in the third period. Howie
Cassady darted over from the one
to cap a 98-yard march. Jerry Har-
krader, Cassady's sub, scooted 16
for the fifth Buck touchdown.
It was with Illinois trailing, 34-0,
that Caroline filched a pass by
Ohio State's quarterback, Johnny
Borton, and streaked 41 yards to;
score.
The sixth Ohio State touchdown
was scored by Borton, understudy
to Dave Leggett, on a one-yard
sneak. This Buckeye drive went 61
yards in ten plays.

Boilermaker's Dawson
Foiled by Pass Defense

LAFAYETTE, Ind., (1 -- Duke's
alert defenders ran sophomore
passing sensation Len Dawson out
of the airlanes yesterday but Pur-
due struck back in a second half
rally with the crunching runs of
204-pound fullback Bill Murakow-
ski to score twice and settle for a
13-13 tie.
Dawson, who had hurled eight
touchdown tosses in Purdue's vic-
tories over Missouri and Notre
Dame, found his targets caught by
the Blue 'Devils defensive men to
such an extent that Purdue was
forced to stay close to the ground
in the last half.
Duke, rated No. 6 nationally,
and Purdue, ranked No. 5, each
maintained their unbeaten rec-
ords before 47,000 screeching fans.
The Southerners previously had
romped over Penn 52-0 and edged
Tennessee 7-6.
A recovered fumble touched off
Duke's first touchdown in the sec-
ond period, with Bryant Aldridge
barrelling over from the two to
end a 29-yard drive.
Seconds before the end of the
first half the Blue Devils marched
60 yards with quarterback Jerry
Barger sneaking over from the
one. Jim Nelson booted the first
Duke extra point and Aldridge's
try after the second tally was wide.
Purdue Rebounds
Purdue smashed 65 yards in 17
plays to cut the lead to 13-6 in the
opening 10 minutes of the third
period. Gutman sneaked over from
inches out.
Jim Reichert's conversion at-
tempt was low and wide.
Late in the third Purdue started
another surge that carried 53 yards.
and was capped in the first 30 sec-
onds of the fourth on Murakow-
ski's smash from the seven. Daw-
son's boot was perfect and the
score was tied, 13-13.
At the outset of the second quar-

ter, junior guard W. D. Sesper-
mann recovered a Purdue fumble
by Murakowski on the Boilermak-
er's 29. In eight plays the Blue
Devils ripped across, driving be-
hind the line blasting of halfback
Bill Connor and sophomore Fred
Beasley.
Aldridge, 197-pound senior full-
back, capped the thrust by drill-
ing over from the two.
Aldridge Sparks Duke
Later, Aldridge stole Dawson's
pass, the second interception of
the first half for the Purdue pitch-
er, and Duke smashed 18 yards
to mid-field before the drive fiz-
zled out. But Aldridge's theft
seemed to add more steam to the
Blue Devils who promptly forced
Purdue to punt after smothering
Dawson's aerials.
It was then that Duke raced the
clock to score on a 60-yard thrust
50 seconds before halftime. The
touchdown was set up on Barger's
32-yard screen pass play to Lutz.
The play carried to Purdue's four.
Barger scored on a quarterback
sneak. Aldridge's try for the point
was wide.
Duke............0 13 0 +0-13
Purdue ............0 0 6 7-13
Duke scoring-Touchdowns, Al-
dridge, Barger. Conversion, Nelson.
Purdue scoring -- Touchdowns,
Gutman, Murakowski. Conversion,
Dawson.
'Gophers Slam
Northwestern
For 26-7 Win
MNNEAPOLIS () -- A new,
swashbuckling Minnesota s p i t
Northwestern wide open on the
swift strikes of Bob MNamara
and John Baumgartner yesterday
to herald its return as a Big Ten
force with a 26-7 victory.
The Gopher split T first wore
down early Wildcat resistance
and then befuddled the nine point
underdogs with sudden power that
sprang MNamara for two 24
yard touchdown gallops and Baum-
gartner for one of 43 yards.
From the time reserve right half
Ralph Goode circled right end for
six yards and a touchdown early
in the second quarter, Minnesota
strangled the Northwestern of-,
fense and maneuvered its own at-
tack with sureness and finesse.
Northwesterndgrabbedha 7-0
first quarter lead when halfback
Dick Troglio swept left end for
three yards to top a 44 yard drive.
Minnesota's second string respond-
ed with a 66 yard march, steered
by quarterback Dale Quist and full-
back Frank Bachman and sent'
Goode over for the score.
Minnesota trailed 7-6 at that
point, but McNamara shook offI
three tacklers minutes later on his
first touchdown trot. He repeated
to end an 80 yard parade following
the second half kickoff, and Baum-_
gartner wrecked the Cats four
minutes later with a power smash
off left guard.

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone NO 23-24-1
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES -
LINES 1DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .60 1.34 1.96
3 .70 1.78 2.94
4 .90 2.24 3.92
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
11:00 A.M. Saturday
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Principles of Geomorphology;
probably in Wahr's. Reward. Phone
NO 2-4401, Room 203, Allen Rumsey.
)13A'
LOST: White gold Bulova watch, black
band, in Health Service. Call NO
2-2591. )10A
FOR SALE

FOR SALE
"PURCHASE FROM PURCHASE"
Kodak reflex camera with f 3.5
lens, including case $65.
Purchase Camera Shop, 1116 South
University. )11B
1932 FORD MODEL B, 4 door, new rub-
ber tires, heater and radio. The big
lot across from the car port. Huron
Motor Sales. 22 W. Washington. NO
2-4588. )50B
1954 CHEVROLET, USED, very low mile-
age. Call George, NO 2-7293. )43B
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords-$6.88. Sox,
39c;shorts, 69c; military supplies.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington. )26B
STANDARD PICA typewriter. Good con-
dition. Reasonable, 830 S. Main. )21B
FOR RENT
CAMPUS APT. for four"men. Furnish-
ed two bedroom apt. $140. Inquire
518 E. William. NO 3-8454. )3C

FURNISHED HOUSE near Dexter. Piano.
FORD, 1947, 2 door $125, and drawing Write 18800 Margaeta, Detroit 19, or
table $5.00. Call NO 2-1140. )68B call KE 4-1281. 10D

AMECHE RAMPANT:
Wisconsin Edges Rice, 13-7
In Closing Seconds of Game

1949 PLYMOUTH Convertible, Radio,
Heater, runs perfect, good top. The
big lot across from downtown car-
port. Huron Motor Sales, 222 W.
Washington. NO 2-4588. )64B
1949 FORD, 2 door Sedan. Radio, heat-
er, and overdrive. Price $365. Fitz-
gerald-Jordan. 607 Detroit, Phone NO
8-4141. )69B
1949 STUDEBAKER, 4 door, maroon,
radio, heater, over-drive, real clean
car. The big lot across from down-
town carport. Huron Motor Sales. 222
W. Washington. NO 2-4588. )65B
1948 FORD Two Door, radio, heater,
black color, the big lot across from
downtown carport. Huron Motor
Sales, 222 W. Washington. NO 2-4588.
)60B
1940 MERCURY Club Coupe, good trans-
portation, heater, $100. -Call NO
2-0420. )66B
1951 ANGLIA, one owner, very good
condition, new heater, up to 35 m.p.g.,
parts locally, reasonable, NO 2-5128.
)57B
Herb Estes, Inc.
)55B
For the Bestes
See Herb Estes
1941 Oldsmobile Sedan......$75
1947 Plymouth Convertible .. $245
1946 Dodge two door ...... $175
1947gChevrolet fourndoor station
wagon. Really in excellente
shape .................... $345
1947 Ford four door sedan. Very
good mechanically....... $245
Every used car backed by a 6
months warranty. Oil change
and grease job with every pur-
chase. Open Evenings. 503 E.
Huron. NO 2-3261.
1949 FORD Custom Made radio, heater,
good rubber, real clean. See Smitty,
the big lot across from downtown
carport. Huron Motor Sales, 222 W.
Washington, NO 2-4588. s )61B
XMAS CARDS from $1.95 up. Represent-
ing National Detroit. 10% and 15%
discounts. Contact Bob McCarty, 301
Michigan House, W.Q., Mail only. )9I
1941 CHEVROLET, 2 door, radio and
heater, new rubber tires, one owner.
The big lot across from the car
port. Huron Motor Sales. 222 W.
Washington. NO 2-4588. )51B
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

ROOMS FOR RENT
ROOMS FOR RENT-Close to campus.
Desirable single for man. Phone NO
2-0631.
FREE BOARD AND ROOM for couple
in exchange for wife's housekeeping
services. Large room, private bath,
private entrance in modern home 3
miles from campus. NO 2-9294. )9D
ROOMS FOR FOOTBALL WEEKENDS.
Reserve rooms now. Student Room
Bureau. No fee charged. NO 3-8454. )4D
ROOMS FOR FOOTBALL WEEKENDS.
Reserve rooms now at the Campus
Tourist Homes. 518 E. William (near
State St.) Ph. NO 3-8454. )3D
ROOM AND BOARD
HOME COOKING for men. Well bal-
anced meals. Rebates. 1319 Hill St.
Call NO 2-6422. )4E
HELP WANTED
WANTED: Carriers for the Michigan
Daily. Morning hours, very good sal-
ary. Route open in U. Terrace and
Hospital area. Call NO 2-3241.

HELP WANTED
DIRECTOR WANTED for arenia-style
production of Student Players. Pro-
fessional experience or equivalent
necessary. Call Robert 'Colton, NO
3-3892 or Norm Hartweg, NO 2-3892;
)3K
STUDENTS WIVES wanted for part
time work either mornings or after-
noons. Apply in person, Goldman
Brothers Cleaners, 214 S. State St. )7H
PERSONAL
COME to our big, bountiful, beautiful
BIRTHDAY PARTY, October 13.,)12F
YES, WE WILL TAKE ORDERS for the
New Yorker (8 mos.-$3.00) or any
other mags today. -Student Periodi-
cal. NO 2-3061. , )19F
GIRLS: four budding "barristers want
to meet YOU! Write Box 71 LAW
CLUB. Snapshot if available. Satis-
faction guaranteed or your picture
back. DON'T MISS THIS CHANCE!!
})17P,
BUSINESS SERVICES
WASHING-Finished work and hand
ironing. Rough dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone NO 2-9020. Spec-
-alize in winter cottons and blouses.
)8I
RADIO-PHONO-TV
Service and Sales
Free Pick-Up and Delivery
Fast Service - Reasonable Rates
"Student Service"
ANN ARBOR RADIO AND TV
1% blocks east of East Eng. . )48I
DR. KENNETH N. WESTERMAN, re-
search member of the National As-
sociation of Teacher's of Singing,
author of "Emergent Voice," class
and .private lessons in singing and
speaking. Studio, 715 Granger. Phone
NO 8-6584. )31
DO YOU WANT a.new dress made, al-
terations, or hems turned up? Call.
NO 3-0783. )21
WANTED TO BUY
SAXAPHONE, second-hand tenor want-
ed, call Jack Snavely; NO 8-6320. )1J

Iif

"Keep A-head.
of Your Hair"
. Collegiate styles to please
@11 Hoircutters--No Waiting
* Complete tonsonial service
The DASCOLA Barbers
near Michigan Theatre

SPORTS
KEN COPP
Night Editor

0

BOOKS for CHILDREN

Visit

our Children's

Book Depart-

ment with its excellent selection of
the newest and best books for the
younger groups.
OVERBECK BOOKSTORE
1216 South University

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By The Associated Press
MADISON, Wis. -- Alan (Th
Horse) Ameche, ripped through a
tiring Rice line, which had thrown
back two previous fourth-quarter
drives, for the winning touchdown
in the last 50 seconds, yesterday
in a 13-7 Wisconsin triumph over
the Southwest Conference Owls.
The Texans' front line had
smashed two other thrusts on their
own one and five yard lines be-
fore Ameche, battering 210-pound
fullback, hurtled through a -gap
over his own right tackle for the
winning points.
Rice Storms Back
Ameche, who had one of the
hardest-running days of his ca-
reer also rammed over the first
Wisconsin touchdown in the open-
ing quarter to cap a 70-yard march
the first time the Badgers had the
ball. But the Owls stormed back
on a surprise pass attack to go
ahead midwayin theopening
period on a 20-yard pitch from
John Nisbet to Lamoine Holland,
all alone in -the end zone. Phil
Harris' conversion stood up until
the clock showed only 50 seconds
to go in the game.
The No. 3 ranked team in the
nation started its first fruitless
drive in the waning minutes of
the third period, driving 80 yards
to the Rice one yard line, where
a wide play on a pitchout failed
as Bob Gingrass was rolled out of
bounds just short of the corner
flag by Gordon Kellogg.

e
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The Owls marched out to their
37 where Paul Shwaiko intercept-
ed a Nisbet pass, and the Badgers
started rolling again. This time
they went only to the five, where
Jimmy Miller's fourth-down pass
fell incomplete.
The Owls punted out, but Nis-
bet's kick went only 31 yards to
the Rice 41 where it rolled dead.
This time the battering Badgers
wouldn't be denied. Miller, alter-
nating a short passing attack with
Ameche's line battering, piloted
Wisconsin to the five. There, with
one yard needed for a first down,
sophomore Pat Levenhagen got
three on a dive over the line.
The young halfback picked up
another yard on a slash off tackle.
Then Ameche blasted over the
weary Owls and into the end zone
for the payoff. Buzz Wilson came
in to kick the point.

IR

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GOTHIC FILM SOCIETY announces its 1954-55 season
"FILMS OF THE FANTASTIC"
Opening OCTOBER 18 with'
JEAN COCTEAUS'E "ORPHEUS"
and the first showing in this country of "The Name of the Capital is Warsaw"
-A Venice Film Festival Award Winner from Poland
NOVEMBER 15 FEBRUARY 28
MAD WEDNESDAY, with Harold Lloyd THE INVISIBLE MAN,
the story of a comeback with Claude Rains
the story of a duty
NOVEMBER 29
FALL OF THE HOUSE OF USHER, MARCH 21
by E. A. Poe THE CRAZY RAY,
the story of a decline directed by Rene Clair
the story of a freeze
JANUARY 3 APRIL 11
THE ROCKING HORSE WINNER, IT'S A WONDERFUL LIFE,
with John Mifls directed by Frank Capra
the story of a lust the story of a thaw
JANUARY 24 MAY 2
n CT ! I V .. t& , L. c.._ ...J ._ ._... . ._.

I
JAZZ attMe HILNA
a
55y ... 4,
I 4c
.r.
-J
ELLA FITZGERALD DIZZY GILESPIE
OSCAR PETERSON
And 10 Other Top Stars of Jazz

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