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October 09, 1954 - Image 4

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-10-09

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PAGE P©TM

E MCHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, OCTOBER % 1954

PAG! POU ~ TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY SATURDAY, OCTOBER 9.1954
________________________________________________________________________________________ U p

ATTENDS

'U':

Former 'Harmoncat'
To Entertain at I-Hop

College Roundup

By MARY LEE DINGLER
Gene Jones, '58, professional mu-
sician, draftsman, family man and
freshman extra-ordinary will en-
tertain couples at I-Hop tonight.
Jones, who enrolled in the Liter-
ary College this fall is twenty-sev-
en years old and a former member
of the well known Borrah Mine-
vitch Harmonica Rascals.
A native of Detroit, Jones joined
Stans Speaks
At Accounting
Conference
Speaking at the annual Michigan
Accounting Conference yesterday
Maurice H. Stans of the Alexander
Grant Company, Chicago, stated
that the accounting profession's
new challenge is "A balanced and
acceptable distribution of the im-
mense fruits of production."
Stans pointed out that unless this
balance is found, "All the advan-
tages of the highly geared produc-
tion system may be risked and
lost."
He explained that it would be
useless to think of returning to the
"good old days," for there will be
"'no voluntary surrender of the me-
chanical age for handmade sub-
sistence living."
According to Stans, the way to
achieve understanding is through
improved dissemination of the "ec-
onomic facts of life." He also add-
ed that aid could come from the
philosophical forces of religion, the
humanities, economics and states-
manship.
Also speaking at the conference
which was sponsored by the School
of Business Administration and the
Michigan Association of Certified
Accountants, was Dixon Fagerberg,
Phoenix, Ariz. accountant.
He addressed the group on the
topic of "Perspective in the Prac-
tice of Accountancy."

the group when he was sixteen
years old. "I heard them play at a
down town theater," he stated,
"And I was so impressed that I
went back stage and asked them
to take me along on tour. I couldn't
play a note at the time."
A month later, Jones received a
telegram informing him that the
group needed a new member and
his musical career was underway.
Jones appeared with the group
at the Paramount in New York and
Palmer House in Chicago and
doubtless would have toured abroad
if he hadn't been called to service.
Finishing his stint in 1947, Jones
was married and is now the proud
father of two girls,
Saves For College
For the past two years he has
been saving to attend the Universi-
ty since he has "always cherished
the hope" of obtaining a degree
from Michigan. "At one time," the
serious young veteran confided,
"I was attending night school,
working as a draftsman and en-
tertaining."
Besides getting used to the prob-
lem of studies, which he admits
"are rough," Jones has been spend-
ing a good deal of his time assem-
bling a prefabricated house to ac-
commodate his family.
Although he is eventually plan-
ning a career in business admin-
istration, the talented student in-
tends to retain music as a hobby.
Board Lauds
Health Group
Sponsored by the University, The
National Sanitation Foundation has
been commended by the Board of
Health of New York City.
An independant and voluntary or-
ganization, the Foundation was one
of several organizations honored for
focusing national attention on ad-
vances in the field of food protec-
tion and public health practices.

-Daily-Dean Morton
ERICO VERISSIMO, FERNANDO LOBO
DISCUSS LATIN AMERICA

.....

Brazilian Novelist Calls
For Exchange o Ideas
By LOUISE TYOR of a disease-an irritation-in the
"I think that the United States o ies-nirtto-nih
oyster. A novelist also has to be
should send more of its best peo- irritated to write a novel.;'
ple, writers, artists, teachers, stu-
dents, to Latin America-we have However, to continue hi2 work
businessmen," on a trilogy, based on Brazilian
had our share ofb.e history, Mr. Verissimo will return
advised Erico Verissimo, Brazilian to his native Brazil next year.
novelist and director of culturaltohsnivBrzlexyar
affairs for the Organization of "It is bad for a novelist to be
American States, here yesterday. away from his own country. That's'
Mr. Verissimo noted that the the only reason why I am going
only contact Latin Americans have back," he said.
with people from the United
Staes is through motion pictures
and comic books. "The most legi- Statistics
timate representations of our (Am- Statistics-Engineering Review
erican) culture are never shown I, a University extension course
down there," he saidtt e designed to prepare candidates
"Many people say that Amern- for civil service and other en-
cans have no conception of poetry. gineering exams, will meet at 7
but many aspects of American life iernexmwlmeta7
are poetical-a lovely campus full p.m. Monday in Rm. 165, Busi-
of young people, gardens, houses ness Administration Bldg.
-all express poetic feeling. Living 9. for 8 sessions may be paid
in America is like living in a beau- at class.
tiful picture post-card." aclass.
Exchange of Ideas - -- -- _ -
The novelist, accompanied by4
Fernando Lobo. Brazilian ambas-
sador to the OAS, is presently
making one of his frequent lecturea
tours throughout the country
In conjunction with his position,.A& -
Mr. Verissimo visits universities ILK h A ul
throughout the United States, ex-
changing views and information RESTA1
with people interested in intellec-
tual cooperation within the hem- Open 131 A.M
isphere. 3730 Washtenow N
"In acquainting people with L8-
tin America, I would rather speak ORDERS TO GC
as a novelist than as an adminis-
trator," he said, "and draw para-
llels between Latin America and
the United States."#
"Too Busy"
His work at the Organization of
American States, which is a re-
gional organization of the United
Nations, keeps Mr. Verissimo "too'
busy to write."
He also added that he is "tooF
happy in this country to write. It
is said'that the pearl is a product
Met So rano

The Student Legislature of the
University of Alabama votes this
week on proposals which would
initiate action for a school honor
system.
Final approval of the Legislature
decision must come from the Uni-
versity president. Student opinion
favors the introduction of an hon-
or system.
* * *
The Men's Independent Associa-
tion at the University of Illinois
has voted to support a Student Sen-
ate proposal urging students to stop
patronizing the only barbershop on
campus which still practices Ne-
gro discrimination.
* * *
At Purdue a program for training
house officers has been initiated
by the IFC. Chapter presidents will
receive special training in public
relations. Treasurers will be in-
structed in formulating budgets and
keeping records and pledge trainers
will be advised on pledge pro-
grams.
Harris Hartzler, president of Phi
Delta Theta at the University of
Chicago, who helped lead the fight
to remove bias clause restrictions
from his fraternity's national con-
stitution, labeled student govern-
ment pressure for removal of the
clause as "missing reality."
Help Wanted
At Arts Center
An open meeting for anyone in-
terested in working on scenery,
props, ticket sales or any other
phase of the Dramtic Arts Cen-
ter's program this year willbe held
at 5 p.m. tomorrow at the Ma-
sonic Temple, 327 S. Fourth Ave.
This is an opportunity for stu-
dents and townspeople to ge ac-
quainted with Joe Gistirak, direc-
tor of the Center's seven play sea-
son, and other people closely con-
nected with the undertaking, Prof.
Warner G. Rice, chairman of the
English department and one of the
Center's directors said.
Readt and Use
Daily Classifieds i

liI

"Such pressures as we have been
subjected to since 1951 seemed to
me only to have further entranched
those who opposed change," he
stated.
Jazz Tickets
Tickets for "Jazz at the Phil-
harmonic" may be bought at
the Administration Building
from 9 to 12 a.m. today.
Prices are $1.00, $1.50 and
$2.00.

or

HEADQUARTERS FOR
MICHIGAN BLANKETS
54x72 All Wool-Yellow Felt Block M, .. ..$10.00
54x72 All Wool-Yellow Felt Block M ........ $13.00
54x72 All Wool-Yellow Chenille Block M....$16.00
60x80 All Wool-Chenille Block M .......... $19.50
72x84 All Wool--Extra Large Chenille Block M.$22.50
60x80 Extra Soft Wool--Yellow Felt Mich. Seal,..$25.00
60x80 Extra Soft Wool-Felt Michigan Seal. .. . $27.50

0

CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed Churches
of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director
Res. Ph. NO 5-4205. Office Ph. NO 8-7421

FIRST
and

METHODIST CHURCH
WESLEY FOUNDATION

10:00 A.M.-Morning Service
7:00 P.M.-Evening Service

AVOID
The bank is
THE FIRST PLACE
to be notified of a
change of address.
THE ANN ARBOR BANK
MAIN AND HURON STREETS
STATE STREET AT NICKLES ARCADE
1108 SOUTH UNIVERSITY
WHITMORE LAKE, MICHIGAN
COMPLETE BANKING FACILITIES

/lInch's
Ann Arbor's Busy Bookstore
549 East University

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iar Evenings
the

IDRIVE -iN

.UIRANT

. 12:30 P.M.
ear Pittsfield Village
0 -NO 8-7146

ow-- - -ww--- m

WEEKEND
RAK

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FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, Scientist
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
9:30 A.M.-Sunday School
11:00 A.M.-Sunday Morning Service
Oct. 10-Are Sin, Disease, an dDeath Real?
8 :00 P.M.-Wednesday: Testimonial Service
A free reading room is maintained at 339 South
Main Street where the Bible and all authorized
Christian Science literature may be read, bor-
rowed or purchased.
The Reading Room is open daily except Sundays
and holidays from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday
evenings from 7 to 9 p.m. and Sunday after-
noons from 2:30 to 4:30 p.m.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 West Stadium
(Formerly at Y.M.C.A.)
Sundays-10:15 A.M., 11:00 A.M., 7:30 P.M.
Wednesdays-7:30 P.M., Bible Study, G. Wheeler
Utley, Minister
Hear: "The Herald of Truth" WXYZ-ABC Net-
work Sundays-1:00-1:30 P.M.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
AND STUDENT CENTER
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Henry Kuizenga and George Laurent, Ministers
William S. Baker and Eduard Sue, University
Pastors
9:15 A.M.-Breakfast Discussion, Gospel of
Mark.
9:15 and 11:00 A.M.-Morning Worship
6:45 P.M.-Toward an Ecumenical Church in a
series 'The Shaking of the Foundations."
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
Father McPhillip
William and Thompson Sts,
Sunday Masses-
8:00 - 9:30 - 11:00 - 12:00
Daily-7:00 - 8:00 - 9:00
FRIENDS '(QUAKERY MEETING
Lane Hall
11:00 A.M.-Sundays. Visitors welcome.
THE FIRST UNITARIAN
1917 Washtenaw, Phone NO 2-0085
Edward H. Redman, Minister
Mr. and Mrs. G. C. Bailey, Advisor to Students
Mrs. Fay A. Kincaid, Director of Religious
Education
Miss Betsy Gidley, Organist
10 A.M.-Unitarian Adult Group-Dr. Richard
Hicks on: "Psycho-Analysis and Religion."
11 A.M.-Sermon: "What Is Universalism?" by
Rev. Edward H. Redman.
5:00 P.M,-Unitarian Youth Fellowship meets at
Michigan League.
7:30 P.M.-Unitarian Student Group meets at
the church,

120 South State Street
Merrill R. Abbey, Erland J. Wangdahl,
Eugene A. Ransom, Ministers
9:00 and 10:45 A.M.-Worship: "Do Ends
Justify Means?" Dr. Abbey preaching.
9:30 A.M.-Student Seminar, Topic: "Major
Methodist Beliefs."
10:30 A.M.-Student Seminar, Topic: "Great
Ideas of the Bible."
5:30-Supper and Fellowship
6:45-Worship and Program. "November 2nd
and You" by a panel of speakers.
Welcome to Wesley Foundation Rooms, open daily.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Saturday at 4:30: Open House after the Game
Sunday at 9:30 and at 10:45: Two Worship Op-
portunities, with sermon by the Rev. Martin
Zschoche of St. Joseph, Mich.
Sunday at 6:00: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
Club, Supper-Program. At 7 o'clock new mem-
bers of Gamma Delta will be initiated in a
candlelight ceremony in the chapel.
LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill and Forest Avenue
Dr. H. 0. Yoder, Pastor
Sunday-
9:00 A.M.-Matins Service
10:00 A.M.-Bible Study of the Parables
11:00 A.M.-Worship Services
6:00 P.M.-Supper and Student Talent Program
Tuesday-
7:15-8:15 P.M.-"From the Bible to Our Mod-
ern Age," Dr. George Mendenhall.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East Huron, Phone NO 8-7332
Rev. C. H. Loucks, Minister
Beth Mahone, Asst. Student Counselor
Sunday-
9:45-Student Class studies the First Corin-
thians
11:00-Rev. Claiborn Erickson of New York, guest
speaker.
6:45-Roger Williams Guild Meeting. Rev. Cloi-
born Erickson speaks on "The World Respon-
sibilities of a Christian Student."
EVANGELICAL UNITED BRETHREN
CHURCH
Broadway at Plymouth Rd.
10:00 A.M.-Sunday School
11:00 A.M.-Morning Worship
7:30 P.M.-Evening Service
R. L. Lewis, Minister, Phone NO 3-4061
ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT FOUNDATION
306 North Division St.
Sunday Services at 8, 9, 11 A.M., and 8 P.M.
Lectures on The Faith of the Church at 4:30 P.M.
Supper Club at 6:30 P.M.
FIRST CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE
Corner Lawrence3and Thayer
Phone NO 3-21 39
Rev, Herbert Nation, Minister
Phone NO 2-5361
9:45 A.M.-Sunday School
11:00 A.M.-Morning Worship. The Gideons will
speak.
7:00 P.M.-Young People's Meeting
7:45 P.M.-Evangelistic Service.
Wednesday, 7:45 P.M.-Prayer Meeting.
A hearty welcome is extended to all students.
iiI

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To Open Extra
Series at Hill
Eleanor Steber. soprano of the
Metropolitan Opera, will open this
season's Extra Concert Series at
8:30 p.m. tomorrow in Hill Audi-
torium.
Her program will include works
by Mozart, Puccini and Stravinsky.
As winner of the Metropolitan
Opera Auditions of the Air, shej
was presented with a contract and
made her Met debut as Sophie in
Strauss' "Der Rosenkavalier" on
Dec. 7, 1940.
Since then, Miss Steber has mas-
tered 18 roles in such operas as
"Faust," "Der Meistersinger,"
"La Traviata" and "Madame But-
terfly."
Entirely American in training,
Miss Steber has made but one trip
abroad. In 1947 she was invited to
sing with the Glyndebourne Opera
i the Festival in Edinburgh.
Tickets for tomorrow's concert
are available up until noon today
at the offices of the University Mu-
sical Society in Burton Tower. They
will also be on sale after 7 p.m.
tomorrow at the Hill Auditorium
box office.
Liebee at Meeting
Howard C. Leibee, supervisor of
physical education at the Universi-
ty, recently attended the National
Conference of Physical Education
for college men and women held
in Washington D.C.
Approximately ninety educators
naortipinatre in the meetin .

""..
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et'

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It Costs No More!

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4 Luxurious Room with Bath

SBreak fast in Bed

NUNN-BUSH
and
EDGERTON SHOES

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2 DAYS and 1 NIGHT
Friday and Saturday or Saturday and Sunday
$9 per person, Iwo in a room
$11 per person, one in a room
3 DAYS and 2 NIGHTS
$17 per person, Iwo in a room

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Sold Exclusively ilt Ann Arbor
by Saffelli Bush

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
William and State Sts.
Minister-Rev, Leonard A. Parr
Morning worship at 10:45. Subject of Dr. Parr's
sermon, "What a World!"
Student Guild at 7:00 P.M. in the Mayflower
Room. Peter Vandervoort, Gershom. Morn-
ingstar, Marguerite Long, and Lois Nowak
will conduct a panel on "Appraising and Us-
ing My Religious Heritage."

$1250 o $2415

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