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October 08, 1954 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-10-08

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PAGE MX

THIIL MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, OCTOBER, $, 1954

PAGE S!~ THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY. OCTOBER ~. 1954

_. .. ....e... ...' .. .... . r.. - ....s .. ...... ,.

Salk Method
Evaluation,
To Continue
Over 1,800,000 school children in
the first three grades have parti-
cipated in the nation-wide Salk
vaccine evaluation study now be-
ing conducted.
The center of operations is the
Poliomyelitis Vaccine Evaluation
Center here, which the National
Foundation for Infantile Paralysis
helped set up last January with a
$40,000 grant.
Under the direction of Dr.
Thomas Francis, Jr., chairman of
the Department of Epidemiology,
the program includes a complex
statistical analysis. During its
peak period at the beginning of
August, 117 students were employ-
ed in editing and coding records.
It is estimated that 150,000
workers were employed in the
field administering tests and pre-
paring records. The participants
have been taken from 220 sample
areas and cover 44 states.
The National Foundation for
Infantile Paralysis granted $850,-
000 for the Salk vaccine evalua-
tion program, one of the largest
grants ever given by the Founda-
tion for a project to take place in
a single year.
According to Dr. Francis, re-
sults will not be available until
sometime after April. At the pres-
ent time program workers are in
the process of examining the re-
ports of polio cases among parti-
cipants and their families.
World affairs
To Constitute
Essay Topics
International affairs are the
subject of an essay contest an-
nounced by the Foreign Service
Journal.
With the title of "The Organi-
zation of American Representa-
tion Abroad," the contest offers
prizes up to $1,080 or a $1,750 fel-
lowship at the School of Advanced
[nternational Studies of John Hop-
kins University in Washington.
A committee of six, including
Robert D. Murphy, Deputy Under
Secret~ry of State and John Sloan
Dickey, president of Dartmouth
College, will judge the essays.
The contest closes December 15.
Essays and questions should be
sent to the Foreign Service Jour-
nal, Contest Committee, 1908 G St.,
N.W., Washington 6, D.C.

Tower Construction

-Daily-Chuck Kelsey
FACE-LIFTING-Scaffolding marks the site of repair work re-
cently begun on the tower of the West Engineering Bldg. Origi-
nally constructed in 1902, the tower prepares itself for one of
the traditional long, cold, Ann Arbor winters.
New Architecture Magazine
Will Commence Publication

Religious Poll
Results Told
By Lane Hall
Representing one-ninth of the
student population, Catholics are
again the largest single religious
group on campus with 2,384 mem-
bers according to the annual re-
ligious census compiled by Lane
Hall.
A total of 16,651 students out of
the 18,000 enrollment filed their
denomination on registration "rail-
road tickets" showing a represen-
tation of 58 religious groups. Per-
sons having no preference totaled
2,800 while agnostics and Panthe-
ists numbered less than ten each.
Second largest group was Jews
with 2,005 members, an increase
of 52 over last year. Next are Me-
thodists with 1,937, Presbyterians
with 1,807, Episcopalians with 1,-
234 and Lutherans with 1,077.
All top six church groups show-
ed increases over last year's mark
except Episcopalians who dropped
one. Problems of enlarging church
seating capacity have followed the
record enrollment.
Other large campus groups in-
clude Baptists, Congregationalists,
and Protestants with smaller de-
nominations
Census statistics revealed sev-
eral little-known religious groups.
Although Druids listed in previous
years are no longer on campus,
small numbers of Armenian Apos-
tolic, Bahai, Berian, Ethical Cul-
ture, Gregorian, Holy Roller, and
Huguenot religions are represent-
ed.
First Concert
Stars Steber
Eleanor Steber, soprano of the
Metropolitan Opera, will open this
season's Extra Concert Series at
8:30 p.m. Sunday in Hill Audi-
torium.'
Miss Steber appeared here in
the May Festivals of 1945 and 1952.
Tickets priced at $3, $2.50, $2
and $1.50 are still available in the
offices of the University Musical
Society in Burton Tower.
Director Tryouts
Scheduled Today
Auditions for the 16th Annual
Varsity Night are now being held
in Harris Hall, on the corner of
State and Huron.

Exchange
Students who have not yet
received their checks or un-
sold books from the Student
Book Exchange may pick them
up at the quonset hut near Wa-
terman Gym from 11 a.m. to 1
p.m. tomorrow and from 1 to
3 p.m. Monday.
Ryan Heads
Local Housing
Crackdown
(Continued from Page 1)
Correct Existing Conditions
"We're not in business to prose-
cute," noted Ryan. "We just want
to correct existing conditions."
However, if landlords refuse to co-
operate, penalties up to $500
and/or 10 days in jail for each day
the violation continues may result
from court action.
Ann Arbor's new building depart-
ment organization was approved by
the common council last April,
and went into effect in July.
Before then, a building inspec-
tor, working under an Ann Arbor
building code, had operated with
the Engineering office.
Five Inspectors
Now headed by Ryan, the new
department has five inspectors and
operates under a code issued by
the Building Officials Conference
of America.
"The BOCA code is one of four
nationally recognized codes," said
Ryan. "It's the only code that
covers performance as well as spec-
ifications."
To supplement its building code,
Ann Arbor uses a housing code
passed by the state in 1917.
Faculty Members
To Appear on TV
A concert by the all-faculty
Woodwind Quintet and an inter-
view with Prof. Allan Seager of
the English department will be
featured on "Understanding Our
World" at 1 p.m. tomorrow over
WOOD-TV, Grand Rapids.
Members of the quintet are Nel-
son M. Hauenstein, flute; Lare
Wardrop, oboe; Prof. Albert Lu-
coni, clarinet; Lewis H. Cooper,
bassoon; and Ted M. Evans,
French horn.
Calenders Ready
Union-League calendars are now

e

By DAVID LEVY

"In this election year, with a
two or three margin either way in
the senate chamber and every seat
a crucial factor, the recently va-
cated Nevada senatorship is a cru-
cial factor," commented Prof.
George A. Peek of the Political
Science Department.
The fwo year unexpired term of

the late Senator Pat McCarran
(D-Nev:), is being heatedly con-
tested. Republicans late Wednes-
day won a permanent injunction
from District Judge A. J. Maes-
tretti against a November elec-
tion to fill that position after a
three hour court battle.
Republican Nevada Governor
Charles Russell had alfeady ap-

pointed Reno Attorney Ernest
Brown to fill out the unexpired
term when the court hearing oc-
curred.
Prof. Peek further commented,
"Although the election law is not
precisely clear, perhaps even ob-
scure, reasonable men disagree as
to the Nevada court decision.

}

Peek Comments on Nevada Elections

"Student Publication: Architec-
ture and Design," is the latest
news in campus magazines.
In the discussion stage for over
a year, the student-planned mag-
azine has now reached the posi-
tion of an organized publication.
It will be an independent project,
set up by the students of the
School of Architecture and De-
sign as a vehicle for their inter-
ests and activities.
The new magazine is also vis-
ualized as a connection between
alumni and present and potential
students of the School, as well as
between students of other col-
Stiidents Will Tell
Scholarship Story
Four University students will
tell the story of the Evans' schol-
arship, a tribute to amateur sports
and higher education, on "Michi-
gan Report," at 5:45 p.m. tomor-
row over WWJ-TV, Detroit.
Jim Dygert, '56BAd, Robert Mc-
Masters, '56BAd, John Schubeck,
'57 and Roland Zangoli, '55, all
former golf caddies, will be fea-
tured on the program.

leges. It is hoped that the maga-
zine will bring other fields togeth-
er, and clarify the efforts of the
School.
In addition to publishing two
issues a year, the publication plans
to sponsor panels and invite guest
speakers.
Jose Teran, '56, and Carolyn
McKechnie, '55, will be co-editors
for the coming year. The position
of circulation manager will be
filled by Ken Kaji, '56, and Rob-
ert Stevens, '56, will be business
manager.
On a financial basis, the publi-
cation will be sponsored entirely
by subscriptions. Student subscrip-
tions will be two dollars a year.
Patron subscriptions from faculty
and state architects will be the
main financial backing.
Medical Confab
Eight University psychiatrists
and neurologists will participate
in the 13th annual Convention of
the Central Neuropsychiatric As-
sociation when it meets here to-
morrow for the final day of the
three-day gathering.

Appointments can be arranged available in the lobby of the Un-
by calling 3-1511, ext. 2114, or by ion and in the League Undergra-
applying at Harris Hall. duate Offices.

Retuat

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S,

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