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October 07, 1954 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-10-07

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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 7,1954

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 7,1954 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

L ZZ%.A Wi 4L Lii

Tau DeltaPhi

Gains I-ill Football Playoff Berth

Sammies Down Theta Xi;
AE Pi, Kappa Sigma Wins

4?

Wings Face
Maple Leafs
Iry Tin Cl a4h

MAY SELL OUT:

I

Club Owners To Weigh Fate of A's

In the most significant game of
the Intramural football season thus
far, Tau Delta Phi clinched a first-
place playoff berth yesterday by
overwhelming Alpha Sigma Phi,
28-0.
Chuck Baer threw four touchdown
passes for the winners, with Steve
Fishman and Aaron Podhurst both
catching two.
Podhurst scored two of the extra
points and Fishman one, while
Maury Friedlander wrapped up the
game with his team's 28th point on
the final point after touchdown.
Sammies Trounce Theta Xi
Sigma Alpha Mu won the other
lopsided game of the afternoon as
they continued on their winning way
by soundly beating Theta Xi, 33-0.
Warren Wertheimer threw touch-
down passes to Larry Pearlman,
Tom Kovan, Paul Richman, and
a pair to Paul Groffsky. The Sam-
mies were in complete control of
the game from the start, and dom-
inated play throughout the contest.
Three overtime contests were all
hard fought games, and the win-
ners were the team that gained
most yardage on four downs in the
U.S. 'Tennis
Team Wins
MEXICO CITY W-Vic Seixas
and Tony Trabert, aces of the
United States' Davis Cup team,
slipped through their second round
matches with ease Wednesday in
the 19th pan-American Tennis
Tournament. Both won in straight
sets, as did all seeded players in
the men's singles..

overtime period. Alpha Epsilon Pi
defeated Psi Upsilon in this man-
ner in the first of these affairs
while Kappa Sigma and Theta Chi
beat Sigma Delta and Triangle re-
spectively in the remaining over-
times.
Two other shutoutsrround out the
schedule of social fraternities for
the afternoon. Phi Kappa Tau
scored midway in the final half to
edge Theta Delta Chi, 6-0. The
score came on a pass from tail-
back John Keros to Dale Barker,
and enabled the Phi Kappa Tau
squad to concentrate on keeping
their opponents bottled up for the
remainder of the game.
Ewart Sparks Chi Psis
Chi Psi won with somewhat more
ease over Alpha Phi Alpha as Dale
Ewart sparked his team to a 12-0
victory. Ewart broke loose for 40
yards and his team's first touch-
down and then put the game on ice
with a scoring pass to Stu Schei-
fele.
In the Professional fraternity
game of the afternoon Delta Sigma
Delta scored three times to defeat
Tau Epsilon Rho, 21-6, in the only
game in which both teams scored.
the winners relied on the combina-
tion of Dave Nils' passes to Char-
ley Murray to win the game. The
duo combined for two touchdowns
and two conversions, via the aerial
route.
Today's schedule finds Phi Delta
Phi opposing Delta Sigma Pi; Phi
Alpha Delta vs. Psi Omega; Phil
Chi vs. Phi Rho Sigma; Alpha Kap-
pa Psi vs. Law Club; Nu Sigma Nu:
vs. Alpha Rho Chi; and Phi Delta
Epsilon vs. Delta Theta Phi. All of'
these games will be played at 5:05
at Ferry Field.

CAPT. BINKEY BROEDER AND COACH EVASHEVSKI
Branoff, Baldacci To Miss
Iowa Tilt; Upset Hopes Fade

. ceI JA .asI~II
DETROIT (--The Detroit Red
Wings face "triple trouble" tonight
when they open the hockey season
against the Toronto Maple Leafs in
Olympia Stadium.
First of all, the Red Wings are
worried because their string of
seven straight victories in home
openers is on the line.
Secondly, they are worried about
the ticket sales.
And, thirdly, they are simply
worried about the Maple Leafs.
The Red -Wings haven't lost a
home opener since 1938. In that
time they have won 11 times and
tied three, with the last seven
home openers resulting in victories.
Of equal importance ito the Red
Wings, however, is the surprising
lack of interest at the box office.
The single word "Toronto" always'
has meant a rush for tickets-but
not this time.
The Detroit front office says at-'
tendance may slip below the 11,-
500 figure-a low mark for a Tor-'
'onto game in many a year.
Lastly, the Red Wings are wor-.
ried that the Maple Leafs will be
somewhat inspired in the opener.
If you recall, the Leafs, a proud
tesam, were shut out the first five,
times they played in Detroit last
year.

Halfback Tony Branoff and
Fullback Lou Baldacci will be ab-
sent from Michigan's line up when
the Wolverines take on the Hawk-
eyes from Iowa Saturday.
"Neither Baldacci nor Branoff
will be available for the Iowa
game," Coach Bennie Oosterbaan
said.
However, Jim Bates, who missed
the first two games, worked out
today and will probably see ac-1

The line and backfield went
through routine tuning up exer-
cises before beginning heavy
scrimmaging. In scrimmage the
first string backfield practiced de-
fense situations while reserves
provided offensive plays.
Offensive plays, with tackling
dummies used as the Iowa line,
rounded out the afternoon's prac-
tice.

CHICAGO (AP)-American Lea-
gue club owners will meet again
next Tuesday to determine if the
Philadelphia Athletics must be
sold by the Mack family.
The m e e t i n g at Chicago's
Blackstone Hotel was called Wed-
nesday by league president Will
Harridge, setting it exactly two
weeks after a New York session at
which Roy Mack was given 14
days to raise $750,000 to buy con-
trol of the A's.
The owners unquestionably will
confront M fack with a put-up or
sell-out attitude. Roy has strong-
ly opposed the wishes of his fa-
ther, Connie, and his brother,
Earle, to peddle the debt-ridden
A's to the highest bidder.
Mack To Hear Offers
At the New York meeting of
owners, it was reported Roy gave
the American League written as-
surance he will listen to outside
offers to buy the club, founded by
Connie in 1901, if he failed to raise
the $750,000. The money would be
used by Roy to buy out Connie and
Earle.
Also at the New York meeting
the owners heard details of two
plans to buy out the Macks. One
was from Arnold Johnson, Chicago
business executive, who wants to
shift the A's to Kansas City. The
other came from Thomas Richard-
son, an A's director and president
of the Eastern League.
Each offer reportedly is for $3,-
375,000 which would cover Connie
Mack Stadium and the franchise.
From the sale money. the Macks
would have to liquidate debts es-
timated at more than 1 million
dollars.
Plans Larger Ball Park
Johnson said at his Chicago of-
fice today he had his architects
and engineers in Kansas City this
week to study ways and means of

By DAVE GREY
The modern American football
game has changed a good deal
from the earliest days of the sport
in 11th Century England when
the pigskin was first a human
skull, and then an inflated cow
bladder.
Authentic history blames it all
on a poor Dane's skull found on a
battlefield by workmen, who had
fresh in their memories the Dan-
ish imperialism in England from
1016 to 1042. Work was abandoned
while the men took "sweet re-
venge" by kicking the skull back
and forth.
This proved hard on the feet,
especially for barefooted partici-
pants who took up the idea, but
t];e principle was retained when
an inflated cow bladder was sub-
stituted for the skull.
Game Resembled Soccer
The game caught on quickly aft-
er 1050 with the English. Teams
were made up of members from
neighboring towns, and the play
was somewhat similar to present
day soccer. The main difference,
however, was that the bladder,
dropped at some midway point be-
tween the villages, had to be kick-
ed to the middle of the opposi-
tion's town!
Needless to say, rivalry was
quite heated, with play getting so

enlarging the present Kansas City
ball park from 17,000 to 34,000 ca-
pacity.
Richardson, who says he is
backed by a small group of weal-
thy friends, said he would keep the
A's in Philadelphia in 1955, but
wanted league assurance the club
could be shifted to any one of six

or seven cities if "we decide Phi
adelphia definitely no longer is
two-team town."
Such action requires approv
by six of the eight clubs. Clar
Griffith of Washington and Spik
Briggs of Detroit have publicly ex
pressed opposition to an A's shi
to Kansas City.

wild that most non-participants
near the main street moved to the
safety of indoors until the pro-
ceedings were over.
The authorities finally asked the
citizens to calm down the wild-
ness, and this soon led to the
beginning of standardization of
the game as we know ,it today.
Play was restricted to a certain
area that was marked off with
goal lines, which had to be passed
to score points.
Thus the game of "kicking the
Dane's head" and "kicking the
bladder" was on its way, and by
the 12th Century the name of
"futballe" was popularized.

tion Saturday.
Baldacci, who was released from
Health ; Service yesterday, and
Branoff, suffering from a leg in-
jury, were to be excluded from
heavy drills for the remainder of
the week as Michigan's grid team
sharpens its defense against Iowa's
Captain Binkey Broeder and crew.
Broeder, a fullback, has a 35-
yard punt, average and has netted
45 yards for a 4.5 yard-per-try
mark. The Hawkeye's big ground
gainer is Earl Smith, left halfback,
who has rushed for 121 yards in
16 attempts.
Meanwhile with high spirits,
despite 45-degree weather, the
Wolverine varsity intensified drills
yesterday afternoon in anticipa-
tion of thwarting Iowa's bid for
its third straight win and second
Big Ten victory.

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[GRID SELECTIONS]
(Consensus selections appear in capitals)

"

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

Michigan vs. IOWA
CALIFORNIA vs. Oregon
PURDUE vs. Duke
GEORGIA TECH vs. LSU
Illinois vs. OSU
Indiana vs. MICHIGAN STATE
MINNESOTA vs. Northwestern

8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.

Navy vs. STANFORD
OKLAHOMA vs. Texas
UCLA vs. Washington
Rice vs. WISCONSIN
USC vs. Texas Christian Univ.
Missouri vs. SMU
MARYLAND vs. Wake Forest

15. ARMY vs. Dartmouth

L

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Shownabove are, the Sussex button-down in a neat tatter.
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} .>: _,.
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SELECTIONS
PHIL DOUGLIS-(23-7, .766)--Iowa, California, Purdue, Ga. Tech.,
OSU, Michigan State, Minnesota, Navy, Oklahoma, UCLA, Wis-
consin, USC, SMU, Maryland, Army.
KEN COPP-(22-8, .733)-Michigan, California, Purdue, Ga. Tech.,
Illinois, Michigan State, Minnesota, Stanford, Oklahoma, UCLA,
Wisconsin, USC, SMU, Maryland, Army.
DAVE LIVINGSTON-(22-8, .733)-Iowa, California, Purdue, Ga.
Tech., OSU, Michigan State, Minnesota, Stanford, Oklahoma,
UCLA, Wisconsin, USC, SMU, Maryland, Army.
JIM DYGERT--(21-9, .700)-Iowa, Oregon, Purdue, Ga. Tech., OSU,
Michigan State, Minnesota, Stanford, Oklahoma, UCLA, Wiscon-
son, USC, SMU, Maryland, Army.
HANLEY GURWIN-(21-9, .700)-Iowa, California, Purdue, Ga.
Tech., OSU, Michigan State, Minnesota, Stanford, Oklahoma,
UCLA, Wisconsin, USC, SMU, Maryland, Army.
DON LINDMAN-(21-9, .700)-Iowa, California, Purdue, Ga. Tech.,
OSU, Michigan, State, Minnesota, Stanford, Oklahoma, UCLA,
Wisconsin, USC, Missouri, Maryland, Army.
CORKY SMITH-(21-9, .700)-Michigan, California, Duke, Ga. Tech.,.
OSU, Michigan State, Minnesota, Stanford, Oklahoma, UCLA,
Wisconsin, USC, Missouri, Maryland, Army.
DAVE BAAD-(20-10, .667)-Michigan, California, Duke, Ga. Tech.,
Illinois, Michigan State, Minnesota, Stanford, Oklahoma, UCLA,
USC, SMU, Maryland, Army.
ALAN EISENBERG-(20-10, .667)-Michigan, California, Duke, Ga.
Tech., OSU, Michigan State, Minnesota, Navy, Oklahoma, UCLA,
Wisconsin, USC, SMU, Maryland, Army.
WARREN WERTHEIMER-(20-10, .667)-Iowa, California, Duke,
Ga. Tech, OSU, Michigan State, iMinnesota, Stanford, Oklahoma,
UCLA, Wisconsin, USC, SMU, Maryland, Army.
JACK HORWITZ-(19-11, .633)-Iowa, California, Purdue, Ga. Tech.,
OSU, Michigan State, Minnesota, Stanford, Oklahoma, UCLA,
Wisconsin, USC, SMU, Maryland, Army.

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This is the FINAL
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r(
the case
0of the,
saues-ap
When police arrived at the college haberdashery, they
shook their heads in disbelief. Instead of being gagged
and bound, the salesman was actually glued to the floor.
They took quick stock of the clues . . an empty glue pot,
several odd-shaped pieces of cloth scattered about, an
empty show-case, an empty cash drawer: Ingenious
shirt-robbery !
"Ugg glub," said the salesman, still all stuck-up u * a
stuck down, rather.
When they finally got him extricated with hot water and
chisels, he thanked them nicely and said, "What's the
matter with you jerks? I haven't been robbed."
"No," he explained, "I was simply making a demonstra-
tion of the Van Heusen Century shirt for some of the
boys. Showed them why the revolutionary one-piece
Century collar just won't wrinkle ever. Told 'em how reg-
ular collars are made of three layers of cloth, "glued'
and stitched together. I glued a set, just for emphasis a
learned to demonstrate in Woolworth's."
"Get on with it" sid the detective.

THE

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t e e C ." _ _ __t_ ___

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