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October 03, 1954 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-10-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


SUNDAY OCTOiBER 3,19!54

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAC4X "r1'{tU''

SUDY-_T- ES 95 H IHIA AL

,cAI1W 'r F 7

0

Kids "Learn by Doing' at Art Centerl

Film

Series

r By PHYLLIS LIPSKY
The first project of the Dra-
matic Arts Center to get under way
this year, children's classes in
painting, dramatics and dancing
have started off with an enroll-
ment of more than 300 children
and a long waiting list for some
classes.
The 24 classes held in Ann Ar-
bor High School on Saturdays are
co-sponsored by the Center and
the Ann Arbor Board of Educa-
tion.
Designed to "offer creative ac-
tivity to children" according to

A boy draws a puppet ...
Frank W. Kline, assistant director
of recreation in the city schools,
the present program is an expan-
sion of an idea begun last year
by the Arts Theater Club.
Creative Dance
Creative modern dance classes
taught by Geraldine Miller were'
sponsored by the Club last fall,
and taken over by the Board of
evw Exhibit
On Campus
An exhibition featuring the de-
sign of the modern Olivetti type-
writer is being shown in the Mu-
,seum of _Art this week.
' The exhibit which is titled "De
sign in Industry" will show the
many new features of this radi-
cally different Italian typewriter.
Also on display at the museum
is an exhibit featuring the work
of postwar European photograph-
ers.
An exhibition titled "Women and
Woman" in Early America is cur-
rently being shown at Clements
Library. "Michigan in Four Cen-
turies" is the current display of
the Michigan Historical Collection.

Education after Arts Theater clos-
ed.
Both Mrs. Miller's classes and
an all boys class,. with Jim Sta-
sheff, '56, as instructor, had capa-
city enrollment last year and are
now part of the Dramatic Art
Center's program.'
Dante technique, aimed at de-
veloping body control and teach-
ing children to move gracefully,
as well as creative work are part
of the curriculum, Mrs. Miller ex-
plained.
Ballet Added
Also included in this year's pro-
gram are ballet classes, conducted
by Doris Taylor. Because so few
of the children have had previous
training Mrs. Taylor plans to treat
them all as beginning students.
Phyllis Wright wtio has been
handeling the project for the Cen-
ter explained that none of the
courses will be aimed at prepara-
tion for final production. Empha-
sis will be on a creative approach
in which the children will learn
to express themselves," she said.
Music, story telling, and the act-
ing out of stories through panto-
mime, will be used in dramatics
classes for children of pre -reading
age. In the older groups Gerhart
Lindemulder, who is in charge of
the dramtic program along with
Robin Hall, plans to give older
children more formal training.
Three Areas Integrated
Since many of the children havej
Steber Opens
Extra Concert.
Series Oct. 10
The first of the artists to ap-
pear at the Extra Concert Series,
will be Metropolitan Opera sop-,
rano Eleanor Steber.
Miss Steber's appearance on Oc-
tober 10 will mark the ninth year
of the Extra Concert Series which
supplements the Choral Union
Series.
Taking its first American tour
the Concertgebouw Orchestra of:
Amsterdam will appear as the sec-
ond attraction in the "Extra"
series.
The Robert Shaw Chorale on
December 6, Violinist Isaac Stern
on February 10 and Pianist Walt-
er Gieseking round out the series.
Information concerning tickets1
to these concerts can be obtained
by calling the offices of the Uni-
versity Music Society in Burton
Tower.

signed up for courses in dramatics.
dance and painting, offered at a
combined cost of $20 for 15 weeks,
attempts have been made to inte-
grate the three areas. N
For five and six year olds, for
example, a puppet dance in yes-
terday's creative dance class was
cognated with the making of card-
board puppets in the painting
class. Constructed with moving
joints and put together with paper'
fasteners, the puppets were de-
signed to give children an idea of

To Be Shown
Will Survey Different
Schools of Expression
A series of film-lecture pro-
grams on modern art will be shown
by the Ann Arbor Art Association
in conjunction with the Depart-
ment of Fine Arts beginning Oc-
tober 12.
The series will survey the prin-
cipal schools or types of expression
in the contemporary visual arts.
Films on major artists will be
shown, as well as experimental
art films representing the same
mood of expression.
"Post Impressionist Painters"
will be the topic for the films
shown during October. InhNovem-
ber the school of Matisse and Pi-
casso will be featured.
Films to be shown during March
will be those of the abstract school,
while "surrealism" will be the main
theme for May.
Some of the films to be shown
during the series are "Paul Gau-
gum," "Renoir to Picasso," "Pi-
casso's Guernica," "Alexander Cal-
der," "Mark Tobey," "The World
of Paul Delvaux" and Jean Coc-
teau's "The Blood of the Poet."
The place of showing and individ-
ual programs will be announced at
a later date.
Scheduled for an appearance in
January is the full length film
"Leonardo Da Vinci." This film
which was made to celebrate the
500th anniversary of the birth of
the Renaissance has recently been
shown to high critical acclaim.
Much of the film is drawn from
the actual drawings and manu-
scripts of Leonardo.
The chairmen of the series is
Frank Ludden of the Department
of Fine Arts. For further informa-
tion regarding the program con-
tact Mrs. Elna MacMullan at NO
2-9016.

By DEBRA DURCHSLAG
LaurenceScott, '55, emerging
from a stack of rare art books
bound in silk, and pushing away a
few pairs of leather dancing boots,
explained his program of tapping
the "cultural commodities" mar-
ket.
The current exhibition at Rack-
ham is the result of Scott's re-
quests sent to iron-curtain coun-
tries. Actually the project began
with requests for newspapers and
magazines, but by leaps and
bounds developed into the collec-
tion now on elisplay
Rumored as Weapon
Poland, Czechoslovakia, Ruma-
nia, Hungary, Bulgaria and China
are among the countries repre-
sented. With a certain degree of
modesty, Scott explains that "any-
one could have done the same, but
I was the first to think of it."
However, one rumor has it that
the cultural-exchange program is
in reality a secret weapon. Actual-
ly, a few casual observers imply,
this may be a nation-wide project
to flood iron-curtain countries
with requests for these goods,
forcing workers from munitions
factories, etc. to sit at home and
embroider native costumes.
Scott denies this emphatically.
Wide Interests
By no means are cultural com-

is familiar with French, German,
Italian, Polish, Greek, Czech, Slo-
vac, and to top the list with the
most recent addition, Finnish.
Gargoyle Illustrator
Those readers who have ven-
tured into the pages of a certain
campus magazine known as Gar-
goyle may remember his "campus
types" series. One of the more apt
depictions, he intends to think was
a demure young thing with ruffled
dress and bonnet labeled as "Mar-
tha Cook girl."
Scott's full-bosomed ladies and
aristocratic men in Gargoyle il-
lustrations are only the surface
aspect of his artistic talents. In-
tricately drawn in tempera and
gold-ink, his Russian and Byzan-
tine ikons have attracted a great
deal of admiration. He has painted
over a hundred of them, mostly
given to friends.
"One of my great interests," he
adds, "is Ezra Pound, with whom
I have been corresponding for sev-
eral years." T. S. Eliot, Gertrude
Stein, and Sir Thomas Browne
are others among his select fa-
vorites,

While a girl busily cuts hers out.
how the limbs of a puppet and of
a human body work.
The painting classes are under
the direction of Bonnie Wilt and
Ann Goodyear. In these as well
as in the other classes University
students are working as assistants.
Student aid was sought, Mrs. Wilt
said, because enrollment was so
large that classes had to be in-
creased beyond the original limit
of 15.
Fees for the classes cover the
cost of instruction and materials
only, Kline said, since the Board
of Education is providing class
room space free of charge.

LAURENCE SCOTT DISCUSSES EXHIBIT

LANGUAGE & THE ARTS:
Scott Specializes in Cultural Activity

modities the last of Scott's in- "dreadfully intelligent," but that
terests. He is a sort of self-styled they are still quite fond of him,
painter, scholar and gentleman, Enrolled in the Slavic languages
with a Phi Beta Kappa key at his and literature program, Scott's
waist. His friends admit that he is linguistic ability runs rampant. He

Daily Classifieds
Read and Use

Roberta Peters Sings

By DAVID KAPLAN
Roberta Peters, the diminuitive
coloratura soprano of the Metropol-
itan Opera, believes that opera
singers have to have muscles and
haveto be strong but in the right
places.
Miss Peters, who will open the
Choral Union Concert Series at 8:30
p.m. tomorrow in Hill Auditorium,
said that "a muscular-looking sing-

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1
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Y

-'
ROBERTA PETERS
er would be even worse than a fat
one. The muscles that really mat-
ter are the ones that have to do
with breathing, and they can't be
seen.
Born in the Bronx, 24 years ago,
Miss Peters has spent much of her
life preparing for her musical ca-
reer. Four years ago, however, al-

though she had won coveted con-
tracts with Impresario Sol Hurok
and the Metropolitan Opera, her
name was still practically unknown
to the musical world, because she
had sung only in her teacher's stu-
dio.
Lzst-Minute Debut
Then, with five hours notice, she
stepped on the stage of the Met,
substituting for an ill soprano, and
made her debut to the plaudits of
the critics the next morning.
The following July, Miss Peters
was chosen to sing the leading role
in the Festival of Britain's pro-
duction of "The Bohemian Girl."
In the spring of 1952, the soprano
went to Hollywood to appear in Sol
Hurok's biography, "Tonight We
Sing." When the movie was com-
pleted, she sang her first "Lucia
di Lammermoor" in Cincinnati and
made several concert appearances
at New York's Lewisohn Stadium
and Philadelphia's Robin Hood
Dell.
Although only 24 years old, Miss
Peters has mastered 20 leading
coloratura roles and has also ac-
quired an extensive recital reper-
toire. She speaks Italian, French
and German fluently. She has ap-
peared on radio and television pro-
grams and has made several re-
cordings.
A limited number of tickets for
tomorrow's concert are still avail-
able in the offices of the University
Musical Society in Burton Tower.
Prices for tickets are: $3, $2.50,
$2.00 and $1.50.

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