100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 28, 1954 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-09-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.



k':IC°.. M ' WM

°t RE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDA'Y', E]'T MM 213, 1954

rAG! WiX THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 2~, 1954

$100,000 MUSIC LIBRARY:
'U' Buys Stellfield Collection Through Prof. Cuyler

By DAVID KAPLAN
Prof. Louise Cuyler of the School
of Music made a decision on only
her own feelings which resulted in
the University's purchase of the
Stellfield Music Collection of over
12,000 volumes for $100,000.
She had gone to Belgium on a
Fulbright Scholarship in the fall of
1953 and was told that mose of her
research material was in the inac-
cessible Stellfield Collection in An-
twerp.
The Belgian jurist, J. A. Stell-
field had indicated in his will when
he died in Dec., 1952, that he want-
ed the Collection to go to some in-
stitution which might preserve it
in its entirety and have it open to
scholars.
Invitation to Tea
While Prof. Cuyler was in An-
twerp, her hostess secured an in-
vitation to tea for Prof. Cuyler in
the Stelfield mansion. "I was com-
pletely bowled over by the Collec-
tion and its contents," said Prof.
Cuyler, relating her interview with
Stellfield's heir and daughter Ma-
dame von Strydonck.
Madame von Strydonck was get-
ting impatient, for the State wasn't
sure whether or not it wanted to
buy the Collection, and she had a
contract on her desk from a Ger-
man dealer, awaiting her signa-
ture.
Prof. Cuyler asked rather hesi-
tantly whether Madame von Stry-
donck would entertain an offer out-
side of Europe. The German's con-
tract would not have fulfilled her
father's wishes, so Madame von
Strydonck allowed Prof. Cuyler 10
days to contact Dean Earl V.
Moore of the School of Music.
She wired Dean Moore, who in
turn spoke to University President
Harlan Hatcher and President
Emer-tus Alexander Ruthven.
30-Day Option
Within a few days, University
vice - president, Wilbur Pierpont
called Prof. Cuyler and told her to
take a 30 day option on the Collec-
tion for $3,000.
Prof. Gordon Sutherland and
Hans T. David of the School of Mu-
sic and Frederick Wagman, Direc-
tor of the University Library, con-
ducted some high-speed survey and
with the rapid action of the Board
of Regents along with the availa-
bility of the Alumni Fund, the
purchase was coming close to re-
ality.
"Phone calls came at odd hours
of the night," she said, "and after
I stumbled through the dark to find
the light switch, I didn't know
whether to speak in French or Eng-
lish." By this time, Prof. Cuyler
had quit the work on her Fulbright

Rally!
Hillsdale, Mich (P)-A Hills-
dale County farmer buing in
federal court to have wheat
quotas declared unconstitution-
al, has called a "back to the
Constitution r a11y" for the
Hillsdale County Fairgrounds
next Sunday.
Ralph Shinaberry filed his
suit in U.S. Court at Grand Ra-
pids Sept. 7.
"We have been doing things
unconstitutional for the last
twenty years," Shinaberry said
regarding hiss Sunday rally.
"This is a meeting to get us
started back on the right track.
If the government is going to
say I can't raise all the wheat I
want, then I'm not going to
pay any more property taxes."
Shinaberry says he figures
his suit will cost him $4,000 to
$5,000. While he hasn't asked
any help, fellow farmers along
the Michigan-Ohio border have
started petitions pledging sup-
port of his stand and financial
assistance.
APO To Hold
Open Meeting
The Gamma Pi chapter of Alpha
Phi Omega, national service fra-
ternity, will hold an open meeting
at 7:30 p.m. tonight in Rm. 3-S of
the Union.
Addressing the meeting will be
Assistant Registrar Robert Gar-
field, and Assistant to the Presi-
dent Erich A. Walter.
The only prerequisite for Joining
the club is some previous member-
ship in the Boy Scouts of America.
All interested are invited

California
Trip Taken
BySlosson
While most of us are looking
gloomily towards the cold winds' of
a Michigan winter, Prof. Preston
W. Slosson of the history depart-
ment is teaching and lecturing in.
warmer climes.
Taking a one year leave of ab-
sence from the University, Prof.
Slosson is at the University of Red-
monds in Redmonds, California for
a semester on a Hayes grant.
He is teaching two courses, Cur-
rent Events and Europe from 1500
to 1815, besides giving a series of
lecttures.
"The outstanding feature of this
institution," said Slosson in a let-
ter to his eldest daughter, "is its
incredibly beautiful location. There
'is a backdrop of 10,000-foot moun-
tains with orange groves and palm
trees in front. "The town is small-
er than Ann Arbor," he continued.
"It has a desert climate, in the 90's
in the afternoon and in the 50's at
Inight."
At the end of January, Slosson
will sail on the Queen Mary for
Europe with his wife, daughter
Edith '58, and another daughter
and her husband.
"I want to study the relative po-
sition of various political parties in
France, Italy, and Germany," he
added towards the end of his let-
ter. He will also tour through Eng-
land.
"He is one of the most genuine-
ly modest persons there is," said
the history professor's e I d e s t
daughter, Lucy Slosson Stephen-
son.

LECTURE COURSE:
Gen. Clark To Discuss
Asia; Initiate 'U' Series

Tickets for the University's
Lecture Course may still be ob-
tained at the Hill Auditorium box;
office.
The first of the "Seven Stellar
Attractions," as the series is tit-
led, will be an address on Oct. 12
by General Mark W. Clark, former
Commander-in-Chief of the Far
East Command in the Korean War
and director of negotiations at
Panmunjom. General Clark will
speak on "Struggle in Asia."
Other events scheduled are the
dramatic offerings "The Caine
Mutiny Court Martial," starring
Theater Tickets
Tickets for the Michigan Union-
sponsored trip to Detroit on Oct. 4
to see the stage production, "Mrs.
Patterson," starring Eartha Kitt,
are on sale from 3 to 5 p.m. in the
Union student offices.
Purchase price of $3 includes an
orchestra ticket and bus fare.
Sinnott Honored
Prof. Maurice J. Sinnott of the
University Chemical and Metal-
lurgical Engineering, has been
awarded $2,000 by the American
Society for Metals.
At present, the professor is on
sabbatical leave.

Paul Douglas and Wendell Corey
and "Great Words to Great Mu-
sic," dramatic readings by Claude
Rains.
There will also be lectures by
John Dos Passos, contemporary
novelist, Dr. Harry Schwartz, spe-
cialist on Soviet affairs for the
New York Times. William O. Doug-
las, Associate Justice of the United
States Supreme Court, and John
Mason Brown, Associate Editor of
The Saturday Review.
Season tickets are being sold at
$7.50 for main floor seats and $6.50
for seats in the first balcony.
There is a special low rate of $3.00
for students only. Single admis-
sions will go on sale Oct. 11.

z

i

Check List

PART OF THE STELLFIELD COLLECTION IN ITS ORIGINAL LIBRARY

and was made the University's spe-
cial agent for the Collection.
The biggest difficulty, besides the
weeks of negotiations for the ex-
change of currency, was in pro-
curing the export license. Without
the license, the. Collection could
not be purchased.
The Belgian Government felt that
the Stellfield Collection was a na-
tional treasure and was reluctant
to let it go out of the country. Prof.
Cuyler hired a lawyer, Albert Li-
lar, through the American Embas-
sy in Antwerp.
.Lilar looked throguh the statute
books to see what the Ministry of
Education had defined as national
treasure or "Objets d'art." The
Ministry, who grants the export li-
censes, had listed paintings, sculp-
ture, furniture; everything except
books. Lilar brought this to the at-
tention of the Ministry and the 11-
cense was granted.
Prof. Cuyler gave Madame von
Strydonck the remaining $95,000
which the University had sent her
and the Collection was turned over
to the packers.
Special Boxes
Special boxes, lined with zinc,
were built for the trans-Atlantic
transportation. In all, there were
94 boxes, each weighing 350 pounds,
built at a cost of between eight and
15 dollars. After two and a, half
weeks of packing, the Collection

left eBlgium on April 18. That very
morning, the Belgian Government
called Madame von Strydonck and
said they would purchase the Col-
lection. She informed them that
they were too late.
Upon arrival in Ann Arbor, the
Stellfield Collection was unpacked
in a fire-proof vault in the Gener-
al Library by Frank Stillings, an
Instructor in the School of Music.
Too Many Books
Dean Ralph Sawyer of the Grad-
uate School offered a room in
Rackham for the Collection. The
books were so numerous that only
one quarter of the Collection was
able to fit into the room.
Prof. Cuyler said that the Col-
lection will always be a research li-
brary not open to circulation. The
Collection will take five yearsto
catalogue, but the parts for imme-
diate use will be completely cata-
logued within a year.
The Collection contains books

dating back to 1531, collected works
of ballets, operas, theory, music
criticism; first editions of Mozart,
Haydn and Beethoven; and many
choral, quartet, octet and septet
works, mostly originals.
"The Stellfield Collection is a
musician's and scholar's dream,"
said Prof. Cuyler.
IHC Tryout Result
President of the Inter-House
Council, Stan Levy announced yes-
terday that six men had shown in-
terest thus far in trying out for
IHC this year.
The tryout program is new this
semester and Levy was very pleas-
ed with the turnout. The first IHC
business meeting of the year will
be held at 7:30 p.m. Thursday.

Q Fraternity Pins
Q Sorority Pins
Q Pledges Pins
Q Recognition Piu
L Stationery
Q Programs
Q Invitations
Q Favors
Knitwear
Mugs
Paddles
Q China Ware
Q Michigan Rings
Q House Flags

ms

RIGHT FROM THE START!
Your dry cleaning and laundry
with extra care
ACE HAND LAUNDRY
and DRY CLEANING
1120 South University

S

Check your needs and
visit our store now.

L. G.
1321

BALFOUR CO.
South University

Subscribe to The Daily

"... . i T ......,.,'. ............. ?.. .. _ ...,-,_ ;-rrir - - . .. , .~",.,. . _. 1_' < / : ! rFY -;_- .'
6.4Yc ms'. ._.. a, d>K:..... ,., .. , -. x. ._,.t ... .k x. . ,. . . . . . . . . .. .... 0'01, :. . a... .. ..

4I

Adventure Series To Present
Six Lecture-Film Programs

A travel film-lecture series, en-
titled World Travel and Adventure,
will present six programs this year,
all performances being held at 3
p.m. on Sunday afternoons in Pat-
tengill Auditorium, Ann Arbor High
School.
The series, sponsored by the Ex-
change Club, Beta Sigma Phi, In-
stitute for Regional Exploration and
Ann Arbor Public Schools, will com-
mence with a documentary color
picture, filmed and presented by
Col. Arnold M. Maahs on Oct. 10.
The program will be about the
Pacific area.

Iceland will be featured on Nov.
14, with the film's producer, Rob-
ert Davis, to narrate the show.
On Dec. 12, a film entitled "Into
the Mexican Jungles" will be fea-
tured, while "Across Tropical
Africa" will be shown on Jan. 9.
Ory Feb. 13, Dr. J. Gerald Hoop-
ex will present his film called "Ital-
ian Interlude."
The series will end with a docu-
mentary film on one of South
America's least known countries.
The movie, entitled "Colombia Cav-
alcade," will be shown March 13.

i j-

will

Y

ItFAO

need

V

THIS YEAR

SEMESTER RATE

... $4.00

YEAR RATE

... $6.50

If Mailed ... $1.00 extra
A NATIONAL & INTERNATIONAL NEWS

9 ASSOCIATED PRESS WIRE NEWS

* LOCAL & STATE NEWS
* NATIONALLY KNOWN COLUMNISTS

* UNIVERSITY'S DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

* FASHIONS

r.

Ad" 10 T- t. eA Tl

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan