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February 24, 1954 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-02-24

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i

THE MCHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 1954

THE MICHIGAN D4iILY WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 24. 1954

WIM TICKETS SOLD:
Union Pool Result of Student Campaign

By JIM DYGERT

4>

+ew of those who take an oc-
casional and refreshing dip in the
Union swimming pool know the
story behind it, a story that vivid-
ly illustrates what determined stu-
dent action can do.
For nine years, from the lifting
of the first spade of earth in the
construction of the Union in 1916
to the opening of the poolin 1925,
the Union swimming pool lay in-
complete for lack of funds. It took
a spirited campus campaign to
raise one-third of $16,000 needed
to finish the pool and make the
pool a reality instead of an idle
dream.
AN OFFER by the Alumni As-
sociation to provide two-thirds of
the funds if students raised the
rest touched off the drive in Janu-
ary 1925. Within four days the
Union, with the cooperation of the
Inter-Fraternity Council, raised
$5,50,11, more than the quota, by
selling 1,101 books of swim tickets.
These books contained 25
tickets, each good for one swim
in the pool after it was opened,
and sold for $5 apiece. Frater-
nities sold most of the books in
a battle for the loving cup of-
fered by the Athletic Association
to the fraternity that raised the
most money.
A bronze tablet, it had been an-
nounced, would be inscribed with
the names of the five highest fra-
ternities and placed in the Union
billiard room. Beta Theta Phi
captured the loving cup by dis-
posing of 250 books of swim tick-
ets, more than twice as many as
112 sold by runner-up Alpha Del-
ta Phi. Other fraternities receiv-
iUg recognition for their work in
the drive were Phi Delta Theta,
Sigma Phi, and Chi Psi.
* * *
THE DRIVE'S success enabled
the pool to be opened by May 19-
25 through the installation of the
filtration, treating and heating
plant. Other work, such as the
Find Possible
New Medicines
There is a possibility, that new
antibiotics will be discovered from
subptances brought to the surface
by exploring scientists in Crystal
Cave, Ky.
Robert Richter, a New York mi-
crobiologist believes that he may
have unearthed clues to the pres-
ence of new antibiotics. Richter is
a member of an expedition explor-
ing Crystal Caves for the first
time. Biologists, genologists, me-
terologists and bacteriologists are
experimenting with animal life,
soil, rock and air conditions in the
caves 300 feet underground.
Richter has found what may be
a new type of fungus produced by
the reaction of the atmosphere of
the cave on dead insects. Fungus is
used in developing antibiotics and
there is hope that new antibiotics
may come from this fungus.
ORPHEUM
TODAV thru Sunday
"One of the screen's
most exciting experiences."
-LOOK Magazine

UNION POOL-Union members
re-opened pool in the basement
p.m. daily except Tuesday and
pool from 7 to 10 p.m.
concrete foundation, tiling, drain-
ing fixtures, brass ladders at each
end of the pool, and lockers, had
been completed in the latter part
of 1924 through funds collected in
previous pool campaigns.
At completion, the pool was
described by authorities on such
matters as "one of the very
finest in the country." The use
of a violet ray purifying sys-
tem, besides several layers of
rock and sand, made it a pioneer
in purification systems.

--Daily-Chuck Kelsey
may enjoy a dip in the recently
of the Union from 11 a.m. to 11
Thursday when women use the
which extended a three-foot tile
platform for the benefit of diving
enthusiasts. The recent remodel-
ing of the pool consisted mainly
in removing the balcony and low-
ering the ceiling to provide addi-
tional office room on the main
floor. Only a low springboard re-
mains for divers.
Group Offers
1 ibra.rv A warid

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the University
of Michigan for which the MichiganI
Daily assumes no editorial responsi-
bility. Publication in it is construc-
tive notice to all members of the
University. Notices should be sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 2552
Administration Building before 3 p.m.
the day preceding publication (before
11 a.m. on Saturday),
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 1954
VOL. LXIV, No. 97
Notices
The first Hatcher Open House of the
new semester is scheduled for wednes-
day, Feb. 24, from 4 to 6 at the Presi-
dent's home. Everyone is cordially in-
vited to attend and meet President and
Mrs. Hatcher.
Regents' Meeting, Fri., Mar. 19, at 9:30
a.m. Communications for consideration
at this meeting must be in the Presi-
dent's hands not later than March 11.
LS & A Students. No courses may
dropped from your original elections
after Fri., Feb. 26.
Schools of Education, Music Natural
Resources, and Public Health. Students
who received marks of I, X, or "no re-
ports" at the end of their last semester
or summer session of attendance will
receive a grade of "E" in the course or
courses unless this work is made up by
March 8 in the Schools of Education,
Music, and Public Health. In the School
of Natural Resources of date is Marg1l
5. Students wishing an extension of
time beyond this date in order to make
up this work should file a petition, ad-
dressed to the appropriate official in
their school, with 1513 Administration
Building, where it wil be transmitted.
All veterans who expect to receive
education and training allowance under
Public Law 550 (Korea G.I. Bill) must
pick up DEAN'S MONTHLY CERTIFI-
CATION in appropriate school office, get
instructors' signature for February, and
return that certification to the Dean's
office on or before March 3.
Scholarships: College of Literature,
Science, and the Arts.
Applications for scholarships for the
academic year 1954-55 are now available
in 1220 Angell Hall. All applications
must be returned to that office by
March 10. Applicants, must have had at
least one semester of residence in this
College.
Petitions to the Hopwoood Committee
concerning questions of eligibility must
be in the Hopwood Room by March 1.
ISA Invites Organizations. Any organ-
ization whose purpose is the promotion
of international understanding may pe-
tition for representation in the House
of Representatives of the International
Student Association for the current se-
mester. Petitions should reach P.O. Box
2096 by Fri., Feb. 26, 1954.
(Continued on Page 4)

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone NO 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .60 1.34 1.96
3 .70 1.78 2.94
4 .90 2.24 3.92
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Gold International watch with
black suede band. Reward. Call Jean
Cooper, NO 3-5974. )100A
FOR SALE
1949 FORD (CUSTOM), 2-door; good
tires, good running order. Body needs
some attention-cheap for cash. Call
at 416 S. 5th Ave., Apt. No. 2 any
time after 6 p.m. or all day Sunday.
)324B
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords-$6.88. Sox,
39c; shorts, 69c; military supplies.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington. )14B
1941 CHEVROLET-4-door, radio and
heater. Runs very well. 222 W. Wash-
ington, Phone 2-4588. )318B
1937 CHRYSLER-2-door, well cared for.
Greased regularly, good motor, bat-
tery, and tires; reliable transportation,
only $75. Phone NO 2-9020. )286B
A MEDIUM blue-grey gabardine suit.
Single breasted, sport style. Like new,
size 40 regular. Very reasonably pric-
ed. Call NO 3-1904 after 8 p.m. on
weekdays only. Ask for Steve. )299B
1941 FORD CLUB COUPE-New motor,f
radio and heater. Make us an offer.
222 W. Washington, Phone 2-4588.
)320B
1946 MERCURY CLUB COUPE-Radio
and heater. Loaded with extras. 2221
W. Washington, Phone 2-4588. )321B
TAN REGISTERED MALE BOXER-Call
Ken Pierce, NO 2-3143. )323B
BATTERIES $5 EXCHANGE
Guaranteed - Free Installation
BATTERY STORES ASSOCIATION
Liberty and Ashley )329B
RECLINING, UPHOLSTERED, tapestry
chair with wooden arms and footstool
-fair condition, $10. Two large side-
boards, $8 each. Coal hot water heat-
er with two stovepipes, $7.50. Muntz
table model 14" TV set with antennae
hardly used, $65. Majestic portable
radio with inside and outside aerial,
$50. Pocket size radio without batter-
ies, $15. Six compartment rabbit
hutch,well built, $15. Phone NO
2-9020. )328B
"PURCHASE FROM PURCHASE"
Argus C-3 with case and flash like,
new $48. Purchase Camera Shop, 1116
So. University. NO 8-6972. )327B
PLYMOUTH COUPE - 1940. Excellentf
rubber and motor. Radio and heater.
$125. Phone 8-9826 after 6. )326B
'39 NASH-Overdrive, extras. Name a
real low price. Call NO 3-1846. )325B

1949 CHEVROLET-2 door, radio and
heater. One owner. Very clean. 222
W. Washington, Phone 2-4588. )330B
CANARIES-Beautiful Singers and Fe-
males. Parakeets-$5 each and up.
Any age. Mrs. Ruffins, 562 S. 7th.
)332B
NEW 33% R.P.M. Classical Records --
(RCA, Columbia, London, etc.) Regu-
lar $5.72. Reasonable. Call NO 2-0591
after 6 p.m. )333B
1950 CHEVROLET BELLAIRE - Black
and yellow, straight transmission, ra-
dio and heater. One owner. Shaip.
222 W. Washington. Phone 2-4588.
)331B
ROOM AND BOARD
MISS THAT HOME COOKING? Try the
next best thing for only $1.80/day.
Price includes lunch and supper. Call
or see House Mgr., NO 2-8312; 1319
Cambridge. )18E
ROOMS FOR RENT
ONE LARGE SINGLE room near campus
-maid service, refrigerator privileges.
Call NO 2-7108. )42D
OVERNIGHT GUEST ROOMS
'Rooms by Day or Week
Campus Tourist Homes. Ph. NO 3-8454
518 E. Williams St. (near State)
)25D
ROOMS for Male Students near Union.
Cooking privileges. Call NO 3-8454.
)40D
IMMEDIATELY AVAILABLE-Excellent
living quarters for male student in
house five minutes from campus.
Hot plates allowed, ice box furnished.
Call NO 3-0849. )48D
FOR RENT
UNFURNISHED 4 room flat for rent,
adults only. Heat and water furn-
)shed, 8985 Island Lake Rd. 1 mile
west of Dexter. HA 6-9411. )230
SIAMESE CAT-Stud service, call NO
2-9060. )33C
FOR RENT-Nice room, equipped for
light housekeeping with hot and cold
running water, electric plate, all utili-
ties. Must have a car. Phone NO
2-9020. )34C
ALTERATIONS
ALTERATIONS on ladies garments. Ph.
NO 2-2678. 510 Catherine Street near
State. Alta Graves.
PERSONAL
ARE YOU up on your studies but down
on life? Then try Life-sc a copy.
Phone Student Periodical, NO 5-1843.
) 65F
HELP WANTED
WANTED - Couple to care for elderly
man, will have very comfortable home
6 blocks from campus. Call 3-5606
days, 3-4047 evenings. )66H

FOR SALE

BUSINESS SERVICES
TEACHER OF SINGING and speaking.
Dr. Kenneth N. Westerman, 715 Gran-
ger, NO 8-6584. )291
TYPING SERVICES. Experienced in
manuscripts, theses, and term papers.
Call NO 2-7605, Mrs. Conner. )281
TYPEWRITERS! Portable and Standard
for rent, sales, and service.
MORRILLS
RADIO SERVICE
Auto -- Home - Portable
Phono and T.V.
Fast and Reasonable Service
ANN ARBOR RADIO AND T.V.
"Student Service"
1214 So. Univ., Ph. NO 8-7942
112 blocks east of East Eng. )51
314 State St., Phone NO 8-7177
WASHING, Finished Work, and Hand
Ironing. Buff dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-up
and delivery. Ph. NO 2-9020. )21
PIANO SERVICE -- Tuning, repairing.
Work guaranteed. Call University Mu-
sic House, NO 8-7515. )271
FERRY FIELD BARBER SHOP-806 So.
State. Men, Women and Children.
For appointments, phone NO 8-9507.
"Expert Service and Courtesy"' our
motto. )291

BUSINESS SERVICES
TYPING - Reasonable rates, accurate
and efficient. Phone NO 8-7590. 830
So. Main. }31
GRAD STUDENT available for baby-sit-
ting. Call 3-0471. )301
TYPING expertly done and guaranteed.
3YP-5877. )321
Today and Thursday
OUT UF EVERY
GREAT CONFLICT
HAVE COME GREAT
MOTION PICTURES
All Quiet On The
Western Front
The Big Parade
Wake Island
AND NOW
HAL WALLIS'
CEASE
FIRE!-10

~.G'

t

The Idea of a pool originated J
with the initial construction of
the Union in 1916 when the hole Librarians who have made out-
for the pool was excavated. All standing contributions to the
Union construction was delayed reading of children and young
during the First World War when people are eligible for nomination
the Student Army Training Corp for the first annual Grolier Award,
took over the premises. After the sponsored by the American Li-
war, the pool project lagged be- brary Association.
cause of insufficient funds until The award is available to any
student action made completion librarian in any type of library
possible. who has provided reading g id-
When first opened, the pool was ance for children and young peo-
surrounded by a balcony from ple above the requirements of
daily routine.

Read and Use
Daily Classifieds
HELD OVER!
NOW.They're In The Movies!
...and In COLOR!
L UCILLE .
in M-G-M's hlarious comedy
LONG
ALL IN GORGEOUS COLOR
Extra
DISNEY CARTOON
"RUGGED BEAR"
SPORT * NEWS

'1

Political Group
To Form Today
An organizational meeting of
the Student League For Industrial
Democracy will be held at 7:15
p.m. today in Room 3-S of the
Union.
Aims of the new campus politi-
cal group will be discussed and a
passage vote taken on the club's
constitution. Anyone interested ifs
the organization has been urged
to attend.
Israel Governor
To Address Club
Colonel Basil Herman, military
governor of Negev of the state of
Israel, and Senior Israel Delegate
to the Israel-Egypt Mixed Armis-
tice Commission under the aus-
pices of the United Nations, will
address the Thursday Luncheon
Club at noon tomorrow at the.
Methodist Church.
Rodenhiser Talk
Dr. Herman A. Rodenhiser, head
of the cereal crops and diseases
section of the Agriculture Re-
search Service of the agriculture
department, will speak on "Cereal
Breeding and Cereal Diseases," at
4:15 p.m. today in the Rackham
Amphitheater.

Nominations for the award will'
be accepted from organized groups
or individuals, and must be sub-
mitted to the Association before
April 10.
The presentation of $500 and a
scroll or plaque, will be made by
the Association at its Annual Con-
ference in June.

BAD NEWS . .ELLIT.....MA$.
Never a
motion picture
story like this!

ih,

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LLT. THOMP3ON...KIM up.. oll

Only

4

Shopping Days
Left

J Carton-Novelty--News

.. .'... : t

~~~~~.a... .. . . ...

M1.113

Ihe *tuic CehteI'
LP SALE
COLUMBIA -VICTOR - MERCURY
SALE ENDS FEBRUARY 28th
300 South Thayer

LEE CLUB

U NION

""""""""

ALL-CAMPUS

,!

SPECIAL ENGAGEMENT/

LRREMNE OLIVIER
by WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE
A l. Arthur ankOrganization Presentaion
Showing at 6:30 & 8:50

I

PURCHASE
from
"PURCHASE"

INFORMAL
PAUL BUNYAN
DANCE
Saturday, featuring Paul McDonough
(TICKETS AVAILABLE AT THE UNION)

Miss Ajnerica

.kJ EAGUE

£

i

DON'T FORGET THEM!
FOR THAT NEW INITIATE
WITH THAT SPECIAL CREST
BURR PATTERSON & AULD CO.
1209 South University
)! t"> 4"")"O""'> "")>T< E)>< !">)"G'"> }E' } > <)-"">< )-> -)">

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Friday, March

5,

8 P.M.

.T

.-n

HILL AUDITORIUM

CHORAL UNION CONCERT

..-.. r

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TICKETS:
Reserved
$1.00
General
Admission
75c
On Sale at

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1111

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