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February 20, 1954 - Image 4

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-02-20

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1954

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rvuW T .E MC IG N D IYSTRA, ERAY2,13

OUNDING FATHER:
Prof. Stevens Aids Co-op Beginnings
By DAVID KAPLAN
Prof. Albert K. Stevens of thew
gslih department fills his life
th a home and a family, Eng-
h literature and the cooperative
vement.
With a fondness for co-ops in his
art, Prof. Stevens has aided
npus co-ops from their incep-
n. When the ICC was planning R..'
buy a house in 1944, Prof. Stev-
s attended several talks and din-'
rs connected with buying the .
use, and served on the advisory
nmittee set up by the Univer-

SL Film
Student Legislature Cinema
Guild will feature "Five Fing-
ers" at 7 and 9 p.m. today and
8 p.m.utomorrow in Architec-
ture Auditorium,
Starring James Mason, Dan-
nielle Darrieux, Michael Ren-
nie and Walter Hampden, the
spy thriller is set in North Af-
rica during World War II.
Price of admission is 50 cents.
Stamp Fans
Trade Today

Panel Discusses Roles
Of Teachers, Students

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

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AS PROF. STEVENS recalls,
"The co-ops were nervous and ap-
prehensive. It was their first ven-
ture. They had been labelled as a
dangerous, subversive group, only
because they were misunderstood
by the community.. They were un-
derstood, when soon after the'pub-
lic realized that the co-op would
be paying taxes."
When the house was finally
purchased, and named after him,
Prof. Stevens was quite amazed
and flattered. "It was a free gift,
and purely given," he says, "and
one appreciates so much what he
doesn't deserve.,
The Ann Arbor Cooperative So-
ciety is another place in which
Prof. Stevens exerts his efforts. To-
day, he is not as active in the So-
ciety as he has been in the past,
but still remains one of its loyal
supporters.
He was a charter member of the
Society at its incorporation in
1936; served on the Credit Com-
mittee in 1937; was the editor of
the Newsletter at various times;
and served on the Board of Direc-
tors, and as its president from
1949-1952.
* * *
FIFTY-TWO year old Prof.
Stevens looks back to the fall of
1917, when he ran away from his
home in Fremont and worked in
the shops in Muskegon. He left
home and school because "school
seemed dull and tame, compared
to the war going on in Europe"
He finally returned to school,
and was graduated from Calvin
College in 1924. After one year
in a Theology Seminary con-
nected with Calvin, he came here
to do his graduate work in the
former rhetoric department, now
part of the English department.
Prof. Stevens was married in
June, 1925 to Angelyne Bouwssma,
NROTC Men
G;et Awards
From Tribune
Two University students, Mid-
shipmen Robert Littleson, '54BAd,
and Kent Pickard, '55; have re-
ceived the annual Chicago Tribune
award presented to the man in his
'respective NROTC class at the
University with the highest record
of military achievement, scholas-
tic standing, and character.
Littleson, who received the Gold
Medal award for the outstanding
senior student, is Battalion Com-
mander of the local NROTC unit
and president of the military hon-
orary.society, Scabbard and Blade.
Pickard, 'the winner of the out-
standing junior student's Silver
Medal award, is a major in physics.
Presentation of the awards was
made byCapt. Charles Bond, pro-
fessor of Naval Science.
New Cancer
Ilope Found
An investigation into gluta-
thione, a growth stimulating com-
pound, may lead to important dis-
coveries in cancer research, ac-
cording to Dr. Jere M. Bauer of
the Medical School.
Some cancers have been found
to have an abundant supply of
glutathione which decreases under
X-ray treatment, Dr. Bauer said.
The investigation which he
heads, under the sponsorship of
the American Cancer Society, is
attempting to learn how cancers
draw protein from normal tissues
to support the tumors and what
part glutathione may play in this

process.
Radulovich Case
The case of Milo Radulovich,
'54, who was cleared of an Air
Force charge that he was a secur-
ity risk, is featured in the March
issue of Redbook Magazine.
NEXT SATURDAY
come to the
PAUL
R 1El * v A I

Campus stamp collectors will
have a field day today as the Ann
Arbor Stamp Club holds its an-
nual exhibition and bourse, or
trading session, from noon to 10
p.m. on the third floor of the Un-
ion.
Thirty frames of United States
and foreign stamps will be dis-
played by club members, and a
dozen dealers will attend the
bourse.
Among the exhibitions willEbe
part of Manager of Service En-
terprise Francis C. Shiel's collec-
tion of Columbian errors.
Other University exhibitors in-
clude Prof. Phillip E. Bursley, em-
eritus of romance language, Dr.
James A. Maher of the medical
school and Prof. Peter A. Smith of
the chemistry department.
Kiddle To Appear

Discussion at the first meeting
of a five session forum on college
and university teaching yesterday
centered mainly on getting the
student to perform at his highest
level of ability.1
An atmosphere must be provided
"which encourages full utilization
of the capacities of the individual,"
Prof. Harold M. Dorr of the poli-
tical science department said in
presenting the topic of the panel.
Telling what teacher and stu-
dent expect from each other, he
compared college to an intel-
lectual stairway which reveals
both new educational horizons
and new challenges.
Sponsored by the Committee on
College Relations, the meeting was
moderated by Prof. Algo D. Hen-
derson of the education school.
Panel members included Prof.
Raymond L. Garner of the chem-!
Fihn Festival
Begins Monday
In contrast to prevailing weath-
er in the Ann Arbor region, sub-
arctic Hudson Bay will be shown
on the Flaherty Film Festival
screen at 8 p.m. Monday in Rack-
ham Lecture Hall.
Produced in 1922 by the late
Robert Flaherty, the documentary
records seal and walrus hunts of
Eskimos and shows their igloo-
building activities.
Also on Monday's film bill is
"The Land," a Flaherty film con-
centrated on the great underlying
problems of waste of soil and peo-
ple and the challenge of machines.
Today is the last day to buy
season tickets priced at $2 for the
four-program series from 9 a.m. to
noon in the Administration Bldg.'
lobby.

istry department; Prof. Ernest F

.

Barker, chairman of the physics
department. Prof. Dudley M.
Phelps of the business administra-
tion school; and Prof. Donald G.
Marquis, chairman of the psychol-
ogy department.
Turning to teachers expressing
personal attitudes in class, the
panel deliberated how far an in-
structor can go without indoctri-
nating the students.
The next session of the forum,
which will take up the question of
"Ideas About Teaching and Learn-
ing," will be held March 5.
ISA Reception
To Be Given
The International Students As-
sociation and the International
Center are sponsoring a reception
for foreign students and their
American friends at 8 p.m. today
in the Rackham Bldg.
The program will include Amer-
ican folksongs sung by the Glee
Club and square dancing by the
Lane Hall dance group.
'Purpose of the reception as well
as the Thursday afternoon teas, is
to introduce the foreign and
American students on the campus.

(Continued from Page 2)
22, at 3 p.m., in 3232 Angell Hall. Fred-
erick Lister will speak.
Concerts
The Reginald Kell Players. Reginald
Kell, clarinetist; Joel Rosen, pianist;
Melvin Ritter, violinist; and Aurora
Natola, cellist-will be heard tonight at
8:30 in the second concert of the Cham-
ber Music Festival in Rackham Audi-
torium. They will be heard in a pro-
gram of trios: Beethoven Trio in C
minor, Op. 1, No. 3; Bartok's Con-
trasts; Brahms' Trio in A minor, Op.
114; and Milhaud's Suite, 1937.
Tickets ($1.75 and $1.25) are on sale
this morning at the offices of the Uni-
versity Musical Society until 11:45; and
will also be on sale at the lobby of the
Rackham building after 7:30 preceding
the concert.
Events Today
The Inter-Arts Union will hold its
organizational meeting at 2 p.m. this
afternoon in the League (room to be
Bridge Tourney
The 1954 National Intercollegi-
ate Bridge Tournament will be
held at 7:15 p.m. Sunday at the
Union.
The University will be one of 172
throughout the United States com-
peting in the tournament, which
is open to men and women under-
graduates.

announced). At this time officers will
be elected and plans discussed for this
spring's Student Arts Festival. All in-
terested persons are invited.
Coming Events
Wesleyan Guild. Sunday evening at
6:45 we will hear Dr. James H. Robin-
son of New York City as Wesley's third
Henry Martin Loud Lecturer.
The Campus Division Play of the In-
tercollegiate Bridge Tournament will be
held Sun., Feb. 21, at 7:15 p.m., in the
Union. All undergraduates are invited
to participate.
Newman Club Formal Initiation will
be held Sun., Feb. 21, at 7:30 p.m. All
those who have purchased member-
ships for the fall or spring semester are
invited to attend. Club pins will be
given out and those who havenot pur-
chased them yet may do so. Following
the Initiation will be a social mixer at
Father Richard Center.
Lydia Mendelssohn Box Office will
open at 10 a.m. Wed., Feb. 24, for the
sale of season tickets for the Depart-
ment of Speech 1954 SPRING PLAY-
BILL. Included on the series are Rich-
ard Strauss' comic bpera, ARIADNE OF'
NAXOS, produced with the School of
Music, March 2-6; Shakespeare's THE
TAMING OF THE SHREW, March 25-
27; and Eugene Hochman's 1953 Hop-
wood winner, VERANDA ON THE
HIGHWAY, April 22-24. Season tickets
are available at $3.25-$2.60-$1.90. Stu-
dent season tickets for the three open-
ing nights are $1.50. Tickets for indi-
vidual performances will 'go on Wae
March 1 at the Lydia Mendelssohn Box
Office, north end of the Michigan
League.

-Daily-Don Campbell
CO-OP SUPPORTER PROF. ALBERT K. STEVENS

and after receiving his Master's
Degree in 1926, joined the faculty
of the University in 1927. He has
taught here since then.
The Stevens' have five children,
three boys and two girls. Only one,
Mary, is a student at the Univer-

sity. She is 19 years old, majoring
in Psychology, and has a pert re-
semblance to Katharine Hepburn.
The children range in age from 9
to 27 years of age. Prof. Stevens
also has three grandchildren. "All
boys," he cheerfully added.

On TV

Program

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PSYCHOLOGY 31:
New Experimental, Classes
Set Up To Interest Students

Prof. Lawrence B. Kiddle of the
romance languages department
will be guest on today's "Under-
standing our World," television
series at 1 p.m. over WOOD-TV.
Theme of the program will be
"Foreign Language as a Key to
World Understanding."
At 5:45 p.m. on station WWJ-
TV, a ten-minute film tour of Wo-
men's Hospital will be featured.

t;

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In order to find an answer to
the problem of getting students in-
terested and curious about psy-
chological data, the psychology de-
partment has set up two new
types of experimental classes with-
in their Psychology 31 program
this semester.
"We want to find out how to
make such a large introductory
course stimulating to all types of
students," Prof. Wilbert J. Mc-
Keachie of the psychology de-1
partment explained.
* * e
ACCORDING TO the plan, each
Psychology 31 instructor has se-
lected one or two students for
tutorial purposes. These students
will not attend class, but instead
will meet with the instructor once
a week, when many areas will be
discussed more thoroughly. The
students are expected to work ac-
cording to their own ability, and
the assignment of outside work
will be up to them.
These special students volun-
teered and were given a test
composed of questions from for-
mer final examinations in the
course.

twelve which will meet in seminars
for two hours a week.
In addition to these classes, the
former experimental program, the
student responsibility program, is
being continued by Joseph A. Pat-
ton.
Lasswell Asks
Reorganization
Prof. Harold D. Lasswell of the
Yale University Law School yester-
day pointed out that a reorganiza-
tion of political science is neces-
sary to develop techniques of em-
pirical verification.
In his discussion on the "Next"
Steps in Political Behavior Re-
search," the professor emphasized
that the political scientist has the
"responsibility" to use theory that
is scientific and testable by fact.

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ENGINEERING
SENIORS ..,

ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Sts.
Masses Daily at 7:00 A.M., 8:00 A.M., 9:00 A.M.
Sunday at 8-9:30 A.M., 11-12.
Novena Devotions, Wednesday Evenings 7:30 P.M.
Newman Club Rooms in Father Richard Center.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed Churches
of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest k
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director
Res. Ph. NO 5-4205. OfficePh. NO 8-7421
10:00 A.M.: Morning Service.
7:30 P.M.: Evening Service.
THEOSOPHICAL SOCIETY in Ann Arbor
presents Series of Introductory Talks on Theosophy
every Wednesday at 8 P.M.
Place: 736 So. State St., Telephone NO 2-6295
Topic for next Wednesday, Feb. 24th: "Involu-
tion of Life and Form preceeds Evolution."
Public is cordially invited.

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North American
Aviation
Los Angeles,
will interview here
MARCH 2

He disqualified the traditional
case history method as a non-
scientific way of gathering data
and showed the fallacies of basing
political theories on inference or
logical reasoning..
A vnrn1iinaI risnti. Th -P r Ta G

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Engineering Notice
The Glenn L. Martin Company repre-
sentative will visit the campus on March
1 and 2, 1954 to discuss opportunities for
graduating seniors of the School of Engi-
neering.
Contact your placement office for ap-
pointment and further details.
THE GLENN L. MARTIN CO.
BALTIMORE 3, MD.

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FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
120 South State Street
Merrill R. Abbey, Erland .. Wangdahl,
Eugene A. Ransom, Ministers
9:00 and 10:45 A.M.: Worship: Dr. James
Robinson, Pastor of Church of the Master,'
Harlem, New York City, will speak on the topic
"Imperative Choices."
10:15 A.M.: Student Seminar: Sermon discussion.
5:30 P.M.: Fellowship Supper.
7:00 P.M.: Dr: Robinson will give the sermon in
Universal Day of Prayer service.
THE FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw, Phone NO 2-0085
Edward H. Redman, Minister
10:00 A.M.: Unitarian Adult Group-Mr. Charles
Lipson with illustrated and humorous presen-
tation on: "American Life as Seen 'through
Comic Strips."
11:00 A.M.: Unitarian Jr.-Hi and High Forum-
Mr. Bob Marshall on: "Tasks-for Young Lib-
eraIs."
11:00 A.M.: Services of Worship-Rev. Edward
H. Redman preaching on: "The Freedom to
Study and the Freedom to Speak."
7:30 P.M.: Unitarian Students-transportation
from Lane Hall at 7:15. Program on: "Hi-fi,
Middle-fi, and Low-fi."
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
State and Huron Streets, Phone NO 2-1121
Wm. C. Bennett, Pastor
1O:00 A.M.: Sunday School. Classes for all ages.
11:00 A.M.: "The Providence of God."
6:30 P.M.: Youth Groups.
7:30 P.M.: "Spiritual Resources."
Wednesday, 7:30: Prayer Meeting.
A warm welcome awaits you here. Come and hear
the Word of God. .
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 West Stadium
(Formerly at Y.M.C.A.)
Sundays: 10:15, 11:00 A.M., 7:30 P.M.
Wednesdays: 7:30 P.M., Bible Study.
G. Wheeler Utley, Minister
Hear: "The Herald of Truth" WXYZ-ABC Net-
work Sundays: 1:00-1:30 P.M.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
William and State Sts.
Minister-Rev. Leonard A. Parr
10:45 A.M.: Dr. Parr will speak on "The Dedica-
tion of the Ordinary."
7:00 P.M.: Student Guild will participate in the
Universal Day of Prayer at the Methodist
Church. Dr. James Robinson, Pastor of Church
of the Master in New York City, and one of the
Laud Laborers, will speak,

LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill and Forest Avenue
Dr. H. O. Yoder, Pastor
Sunday-9:00 A.M.: Matins Service.
10:00 A.M.: Bible Study.
11:00 A.M.: Worship Service.
6:30 P.M.: Meet at Center to attend World Day
of Prayer.
ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
306 North Division St.
Rev. Henry Lewis, Rector
Dr. Robert H. Whitaker, Chaplain for
Student Foundation
Mrs. Elizabeth M. Davis; Social Director
8:00 A.M.: Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M.: Holy Communion and Commentary.
(Student Breakfasts follow both of these ser-
vices at Canterbury House.)
11:00 A.M.: Church School.
11:00 A.M.: Morning Prayer and Sermon.
4:30 P.M.: Student Confirmation Class, Can-
terbury House.
6:00 P.M.: Youth Group.
6:00 P.M.: University Student Supper Club.
7:00 P.M.: Adult Confirmation Class, Parish
House League.
8:00 P.M.: Evening Prayer and Commentary.
During the Week: Wednesday and Thursday, Holy
Communion 7:00 A.M., followed by student
breakfast; Friday, Holy Communion 12:10 P.M.
Tuesday and Friday, Tea at Canterbury House,
4:00-5:15, Friday, Canterbury Club, 7:30 P.M.
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. George Barger, Minister
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship.
Sermon: "The Object of Prayer."
Nursery for children during service.
9:45 A.M.: Church School.
will participate in Universal Day of Prayer
Service at the Methodist Church, 7:00 P.M.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday't9:30 and at 10:45: Two worship
opportunities, with the pastor preaching on
"Religiosity Is Not Enough!"
Sunday at 6:00: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
Club, Supper-Program.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East Huron, Phone 7332
Rev. C. H. Loucks, Pastor and
Student Counselor
9:45 A.M.: The Student Class discusses "What
Students Can Believe About Judiasm."
11:00 A.M.: The Morning Worship Service.
"Life's Constants" - Rev. Loucks.
6:45 P.M.: Roger Williams Guild. Meet at tthe
Guild H use to leave for the Universal Student
Day of Prayer at the Methodist Church.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL AND
REFORMED
423 South Fourth Ave.
Walter S. Press, Pastor
William H. Bos, Minister to Students
Irene Applin Boice, Director of Music
10:45 A.M.: Worship Service. "'The Call 6f
Christ to Mission and Unity," the sermon by
G. H. Gebhardt.
7:00 P.M.: Socio-drama on "Inter-Racial Rela-
tions."

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LOW COST BANK
AUTO LOANS,
New Cars-$4.00 per $100.00

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Jneraton
ORGANIZATIONAL MEETING I

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FIRST CHURCH OF
1833 Washtenaw Ave.

CHRIST, Scientist

9:30 A.M.: Sunday School.
11:00 AM.: Sunday Morning Services.
Feb. 21-Mind.
5:00 P.M.: Sunday Evening Service.
8:00 P.M. Wednesday: Testimonial Service.

Late Model

Used Cars-

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FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

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