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May 21, 1954 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-05-21

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FRIIIAY, MAY 21, 1934 _.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGR THRIM

FRIDAY, MAY 21, 1954 - THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAflK TW1~W~U

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SEGREGATION DECISION:
Wright Sees Intangibles
Considered in Court Case

Men's Glee
Club Elects
New Heads

'WHETHER' OR 'WEATHER':
Few Words A t Fault
For Spelling Errors

By GAIL GOLDSTEIN
"For many years the courts have
skirted the issue of the constitu-
tionality of segregation," Herbert
Wright, National Youth Secretary
of the National Association for the
Advancement of Colored People
told club members Wednesday.
Speaking on "The Significance
of the Supreme Court Decision,"
Wright said that formerly the
courts have relied on tangibles. In
the latest cases regarding the seg-
regation question, these courts
have also taken the intangibles
into consideration: motivations of
people, the reactions of persons
who have been discriminated
against, and the psychology of the
situation.
"Taken along with the legal fac-
tors, these intangibles made the
ultimate decision of the court im-
perative, "Wright continued. "We
must wait for the final decree to

4-- --------
be drawn up next fall, but some
states are voluntarily starting edu-
cation and housing projects even
now."
Problems Remain
Wright continued by speaking of
the probability of rehearings on
the problem and of adverse opin-
ion in some of the southern states.
However, he feels that these prob-
lems will be worked out in time.
Wright has been a member of a
group that has studied segregation
on trips all over the United States.
Discussions on solving the prob-
lems have centered around the
housing situation and school and
church questions.
Wright Confident
In a question period following
the talk, Wright continued to place
his confidence in the outlook for
Negroes in the United States. He
said, "This cannot be an automatic
change. Every person who believes
in the democratic way of life must

-Daily-John Hirtzei
LADY PHOO
. prefers sculpture to trees

Chi Phi Boasts Smallest
Pledge-a Baby Sparrow

Group To Discuss

Culminating a year's activities,
the men's Glee Club gave their
awards and elected their officers
for next fall at its annual spring
banquet Wednesday evening.
Club officers are Gordon Fergu-
son, '57, president, Richard Maier,
'55, vice-president, George Dutter,
'54BAd, business manager, Rob-
ert Fritts, '56, assistant business
manager, Harry.Scarr, '56, assist-
ant business manager, Tom Schill,
'56, publicity manager, Bob Brown,
'56, assistant publicity manager
and Reid Wagstaff, '56, librarian.
The most valuable award went
to Richard Kennedy, '54, student
business manager of the club. Four
members received the Novelaires
Award for their service to the club.
They were Donald Smith, '54, vice-
president, Daniel Parsons, '55,
George Dutter, '54BAd, publicity
manager and Bruce Treweek, '54.
An Honorary Novelaires Award
was presented to James Shortt,
Jr., Grad., assistant to the Direc-
tor of University Relations, for
his work in arranging concerts and
handling other details for the Glee
Club.
Five Glee Club Scholarships,
awarded on the basis of service to
the club as well as financial need,
went to James Berg, '56SM, Barry
Collier, '57E, Gordon Ferguson, '57,
Lawrence Frohman, '55, Reid Wag-
staff, '56, and George Dutter,
'54BAd.
The club presented its director,
Prof. Philip A. Duey, with a 35-
mm. camera and flash equipment.
'Promoter'
The Student Legislature Cin-
ema Guild movie "The Promo-
ter" starring Alec Guiness and
Glynis Johns will be shown at
7 and 9 p.m. today and tomor-
row and 8 p.m. Sunday at Ar-
chitecture Auditorium.
Admission is 50 cents.

fI:

LSA Petitions
Due Monday
Petitions for the remaining po-
sitions on the Literary College
Conference Steering Committee
should be turned in by 4 p.m.
Monday at the office of Assistant
Dean James H. Robertson.
The applications are available in
Dean Robertson's office, 1220 An-
gell Hall. All literary college un-
dergraduates may petition for the
offices.
LINEI
yourself to a delicious
al of PIZZA and
EER or WINE.
za to ftake out.
NOVA
;an, Ypsilanti
-i

a' Tput effort into this undertaking. By LEE MARKS
Industrial Law ptchanged the name to Lady Phoo."
"I guess when he learns to fly, Enjoys Strange Diet
Attorneys from all over Michi- H c mhe'll leave," ruefully admitted Ed Because regular bird seed is too
gan will meet to discuss important m JAAIAI1 Patterson, '55A&D, but for the big, 'Lady Phoo subsists on a
legal problems arising in the field being, Chi Phi's are unique diet of strained baby food
of labor-management relations, in Petitions are due at noon to- ejoying -spinach, liver, beef and vegeta-
Ann Arbor today and tomorrow. day for nine positions on the their latest pledge-a baby Eng- I bles.
Homecoming Dance Committee, lish Sparrow. "Lady Phoo is a pretty fussy lit-
e according "to Jay Martin, '55, Still too young to fly, she was tle bird," noted Patterson. "She
The petitions may be picked found several days ago in front of won't eat out of the can, and she
The 28th Annual State Sing of up and returned at the Student East Quadrangle. doesn't like being fed with an eye
the Michigan Male Chorus Asso- Legislature's headquarters in "At first we named her Phoo," dropper. In fact, the only way we
ciation will take place at 8:30 p.m. the basement of the Union. said Patterson, "but when we can make her eat is for me to dip
tomorrow in Hill Auditorium. learned she was English, we my finger in the food and let her
peck away."
An odd looking, tree-like affair
serves as Lady Phoo's home. "I
made it last year in sculpture
class," Paterson commented, "but
I never thought I'd be using it for
this. Lady Phoo thinks it's a tree."
Bird Likes Perch
A friendly bird, Lady Phoo seems
equally at home on her strange
perch or on Patterson's finger.
"The other boys in the house get a
real kick out of her," said Patter-
son. "If one more tries to feed her,
I think she'll explode."
The only one in the house not,
friendly to Lady Phoo is the Chi
Phi's mascot, Mugs, a black span-
iel. "Mugs likes birds - to eat,"
noted Patterson, adding, "so far
though, she's only gotten within!
sniffing distance."
Now able to fly about ten feet
before falling to the ground, La%r
Phoo flits calmly around the room,
undisturbed by the commotion she
causes.
Engineering Group
)lects Officers
The Sophomore Engineering
Council, which has as its main
objectives the framing of a con-
stitution and participation in the
recently formed Engineering Coun-
cil, recently elected the following
officers: Thomas Platt, '57E, presi-
The Early Birds didn't get all dent, Nancy Farrell, '57ei -o
'57E, secretary.
Others elected to the five-mem-
'57E, and Arthur Kuiper, '57E.
AAUP To Meet
You can still get yours at the Dr. Ralph E. Himstead, general
secretary of the American Asso-
ciation of University Professors,
Student Publications Budding will address the luncheon of the
local chapters of the organization
M onday thru Friday-- 3:30 to 5-00PMon"The Proposition is Profession-
al; The Nature, Purpose and Work
of the AAUP" at 12:30 p.m. tomor-
row in the Anderson Rm. of the
Union.
Election of officers will follow
the luncheon.
AT THE CAMPUS BOOTERY
COLLEGE-END SHOE SALE
MEN'S AND WOMEN'S FINE SHOES
SAVE 10%-20% up to 30%

III

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Korea Veterans
Korean war veterans who were
discharged or separated from ser-
vice before August 20, 1952, and
have not taken advantage of the
GI training benefits must enroll in
an approved program of training
before August 20 in order to con-
tinue studies afterward, according
to the Veterans Administration.
Itiformation on the program may
be acquired from the VA informa-
tion service at 310 E. Jefferson
Ave., Detroit 32, Mich.

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