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May 19, 1954 - Image 6

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Michigan Daily, 1954-05-19

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I
PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY. MAY 19, 1954

s

PAIW MiT TIlE MIChIGAN DAILY WEDNESDAY, MAY 19, 1954
-- S

I

'WANTED' ALUMNUS:
Youngest Film Director Revisits 'U'

Professors
Tell Grant
Cancellations
(Continued from Page 1)

By GAIL GOLDSTEIN
Hollywood's youngest film direc-
tor was on campus this week visit-
ing. former professors and lectur-
ing to 'U' classes in production, di-
recting, and acting.
John Rich, a former student of
Prof. Garnet Garrison of the
speech department, was one of the
first students to major in radio
at the University. He received his
B.A. degree in 1948 and his mast-
ers in 1949.
A Phi Beta Kappa student, Rich
went to New York after his grad-
uate work and became director of
the NBC radio program, "Want-
ed," a dramatic commentary hunt-
ing wanted criminals.
Rich and his crew went all over
the United States to reach the
people involved in the cases, Aft-
er four major criminals were cap-
tured as a result of this program,
Rich found that, he was "not
exactly appreciated by the under-
world and decided to hide out in
TV.'"
The first television ever done
on open water, which Rich direct-
ed, received a Television Academy
Award for the best special event
coverage of the year. This was in
connection with the Florence
Chadwick channel swim which

i

for non-restricted work without'
any announcement of reasons and
opportunity for appeal."

Pacifist, Draft
To Be Queried
The Fellowship of Reconcilia-
tion will meet at 8 p.m. today in
the Lounge of the Wesleyan
Church to hold a panel discussion
on "The Pacifist and the Draft
Law."
Panel members will explain the
legal rights of conscientious ob-
jectors. Members of the panel are:
Fred Hutchins, Eugene Ransom, a
conscious conscientious objector
during the Second World War, and
Harold Gray, a conscientious ob-
jector during both World Wars.
Chairman of the panel will be
Harry Swann of Ann Arbor.
The public is invited to this
meeting and refreshments will be
served.

detBrafatakCneruy1os

the Michigan League. We will discuss
and evaluate the club's past activities
and our plans for next year. Please try
to make it because this will be the last
club function of the year.
Wesleyan Guild. Hope to see you at
Martin Worship in the chapel, 7:30-
7:50 a.m., and in the Lounge for mid-
week refresher tea, 4-5:30. Do you have
your tickets for the Senior Banquet?
Plan to come and honor our seniors.
Le Cercle Francais will hold its last
meeting of the year tonight at
8 p.m. in the Michigan League. Election
of officers, plus a program of varied
"divertissement," will make this an
enjoyable evening. All members urged
to attend. Everyone welcome!l
N.A.A.C.P. Attention-special meeting.
Herbert Wright, the National Youth
Secretary of the N.A.A.C.P. will dis-
cuss "The Significance of the Supreme
Court Decision" tonight at 7:30 in Au-
ditorium B, Angell Hall.
The 1956 J-Hop Committee will meet
today at 3 p.m. in the Union.
Coming Events
Engineering Council. There will be an
open meeting Thurs., May 20, at 7 p.m.
in the Union. The main topic for dis-

cussion will be Freshman and Senior
Assemblies in the Engineering College.
Anyone interested in changes in the
Assembly system is urged to attend
this meeting.
The American Society for Public Ad-
ministration and the Political Science
Roundtable will jointly sponsor a lec-
ture by Prof. Edward H. Litchfield, Dean
of the School of Public and Business
Administration at Cornell University
on Thurs., May 20, 7:45 p.m., Rackham
Assembly Hall. Prof. Litchfield will
speak on "Creating and Controlling a
Responsible Bureaucracy in Indonesia.
Question period and refreshments will
follow. All are cordially invited.
Christian Science Organization. Tes-
timony meeting Thurs., May 20, at 7:30
p.m. Fireside Room, Lane Hall. All are
welcome.
The International Tea, aponsored by
the International Center and the Inter-
national Students' Association, will be
held Thurs., May 20, from 4:30 to 6
o'clock at the International Center.
La p'tite causette will meet tomorrow
afternoon from 3:30 to 5:00 p.m. in
the Michigan Union Cafeteria. All in-
terested students invited!l
Episcopal Student Foundation. Stu-

dent Breakfast at canterbury House
following 7 a.m. service of Holy Comy
munion, Thurs., May 20.
Hillel Foundation, Thurs., May 20,
7:15 pm., Hillel Bridge Tournament
Bring a partner or come alone. For res-
ervations contact Sue Altschul, 483
Jordan, or Mickie Morton, 4006 Alice
Lloyd.
Hillel Foundation, Sun., May 23, 1:30,
Reservations for quad school picnic
must be in by Thurs., May 20. Con-
tact June Levenson, 498 Jordan, or Ber.
nie Rozran, 11 Michigan House, West
Quad.
Hillel Foundation, Reservations for
Friday night dinner must be in by
Thurs., May 20. Call Hillel, NO-3-4129.
Deutscher Verein - Kaffeestunde will
meet on Thurs., May 20, at 3:15 in
Union cafeteria. All are welcome to
practice their conversational German in
the informal atmosphere of this group.
The Congregational - Disciples Guild,
Saturday, May 22, 6:15 p.m., Annual
Guild-Alumni Banquet at the Congre-
gational Church. Call Guild House,
(NO-3-5838) by Thursday for reserva"
tions.
Scabbard and Blade meeting Thurs.,
" May 20, 1930 Hours, 112 North Hall.

~

If this continues, the1
gist believes" it "would1
to control American
thought.

pharacolo-
be possible
scientific

i

-Daily-Dean Morton

JOHN RICH

narrowly nosed
bomb tests toz
award.
Remarking on

. . . young
out the ato
win the cove
the Univers

est movie director
mic television program Rich said that
ted he "was astounded at thehigh
caliber of equipment used for the
shows as well as the enthusiasm
sity of the students in their work."
He also commented on the re-
markable work done by the staff
headed by Prof. Garrison, their
instruction and the service they
are doing the University and the
state.

Part of Pressure
Prof. Nickerson called the ter-"
mination of such grants "another
part of the pressure to get people
to inform." He has heard that an
individual can go to the proper
authorities, "for example the Clar-
dy committee," confess that he
has done wrong while telling on a
few other people and then get his
grant back."
Backing up Prof. Nickerson's
charges, a professor who prefer-
red to remain anonymous said "I
know for a fact that some have
had their grants cancelled because
of political reasons. Since these
grants were given on the basis of
scientific merit, this is unfair."
Physics department chairman
Prof. Ernest F. Barker said that
he had not heard of any local cases
where such action has been taken.
The physicist, who has served on
the board of many selective com-
mittees, doesn't feel that the eval-
uative boards "are subject to such
petty reasoning." Saying that he
thinks such charges are "malicious
gossip,"
Pointing out that in the cases
of withdrawal of grants that he
was familiar with there had been
reasonably clear cut cases of con-
flict," Prof. Henry J. Gomberg of
the engineering college said he
does not think that in general
funds should be withheld.

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

U

Wilkinson Luggage Shop
Reminds You...
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For Prompt Service Bring Repairs
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Full Line of TRUNKS *plus 10%l Fed. Tax
Wilkinson Luggage Shop
327 S. Main St. Phone NO 3-4013
Open Mondays 9 to 8:30 Tues - Sat. 9 to 5:30

I

x

The director attributed much to
the academic training he received
while a student here. "Profession-
al people cannot give as much at-
tention to the training of begin-
ners in the field and the diversi-
fled training received while in
school is an essential part of prep-
aration for a career as a director,"
he said.

1

Son of Stevens' Counsel
Discusses Father's Career

U

00

Lyndon Welch, son of Joseph N.
Welch, Army counsel in the Sen-
ator Joseph R. McCarthy (R-
Wis.) -Army televised squabble,j
once taught in the architecture
school here.
Now commuting from his. home
here to his work outside of. town
as a construction engineer, the
younger Welch, 31-year-old, taught
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CELEBRATE SCHOOL'S END with the
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TAKE EVERYTHING YOU NEEDI Loads
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And, you can also check a trunk-
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riding long-distance on
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back individually or asa

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ing Group
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RN
ADS

Journalism Lecture
Speaking on "Mass Communi-
5 cations and the Dignity of the
Individual," Robert J. Blakely,
Manager of the Central Regional
Office of the Fund for Adult Edu-
cation, will talk at 3 p.m. today
in Rackham Amphitheatre.
A former editor of the editorial
page of the St. Louis Star-Times,
Blakely has written for numerous
magazines.
His speech will be the last in
a journalism department series
entitled "The Press and Civil
Liberties in Crises."
Laughton Film
"Ruggles of Red Gap," starring
Charles Laughton will be present-
ed by the "speech department at
4 p.m. today in the Rackham Lec-
ture Hall.
The film will be shown at the,
last speech assembly of the semes-
ter. There will be no admission
I charge,
Insurance Talk
Mr. Kenneth B. Coates, retired
treasurer of the Great Lakes Steel
Corporation, will speak at 7:30
p.m. today in the Business Ad-
ministration Bldg. on the subject
of "Credit and the Purchase of
Insurance."
The program is being sponsored
by Delta Sigma Pi, profes'sional
business fraternity, and is open to
the public.
Requiem Mass
The University Symphony Or-
chestra and the University Choir,
directed by Maynard Klein, will
pesentVerdi's "Requiem Mass"
at 8:30 p.m. tomorrow in Hill
Auditorium.
The concert is open to the pub-
lic free of charge.

*a basic construction course in the
1950-51 school year.
He also attended the architec-
ture school shortly before the end
of World War II when he was in
the Reserve Officers Naval Archi-
tecture Group.
Asked about his father, senior
partner in a large Boston law
firm, Welch said that he "only
talks about the cases he loses, nev-
er the ones he wins."
One of the many cases which
the Eastern lawyer did win, ac-
cording to the Associated Press,
occurred shortly after he began
practicing law. The opposing law-
yer in that case was a senator.
Boys Against Giants
Counsel Welch told the jury
listening to the case that this was
a situation of "boys defending
against giants." He continued to
wring the hearts of the jurors with
the assertioni that this was un-
fortunate because his client had
a very good case and it was too
bad he couldn't afford to hire
counsel worthy of it.
Welch won the verdict.
Another early case Welch won
when he defended a violinist in a
slander suit brought by a strip-
teaser. Welch's only piece of pos-
sible evidence was a photograph
of the woman in her "working
clothes."
Shehdismissedhhericomplaint
after he pulled the picture from
his pocket and showed it to her
while he was cross-examining the
dancer.
In Boston, where Welch is
known as a "lawyer's lawyer," his
associates said he has a talent
for knowing when to settle a case
_._

(Continued from Page 4)
naw Counties," Thurs., May 20, 4609,
Haven Hall, at 2 p.m. Chairman, A. W.
Bromage.
Doctoral Examination for- Elizabeth
Monroe Drews, Education; thesis: "The
Significance of the Reversal Error in
Reading," Thurs., May 20, East Council
Room, Rackham Building, at 2 p.m.
Chairman, I. H. Anderson,
Doctoral Examination for Leonard'
Mathias Naphtali, Chemical Engineer-
ing;thesis: "The Adsorption of Hydro-
gen and Carbon Dioxide on a Nickel-
Kieselguhr Catalyst," Thurs., May 20,
3201 East Engineering Bldg., at 2 p.m.
Chairman, R. R. White.
Doctoral Examination for Richard Er-
ick Slatery, Physics; thesis: "Design
and Construction of a Thin Lens Coin-
cidence Spectrometer with Applications
to the Decay of Eu152 and EulS4, Thurs.,
May 20, West Council Room, Rackham
Building, at 2 p.m. Chairman, M. L.
Wiedenbeck.
Doctoral Examination for John Harris
Walter, Mathematics; thesis: "Auto-
morphisms of the Projective Unitary
Groups," Thurs., May 20, 3011 Angell
Hall,.at 3 p.m. Chairman, L. Tornheim.
Doctoral Examination for Kurt Karl
Bohnsack, Zoology; thesis: "A Study of
the Forest Floor Arthropods of an Oak-
Hickory Woods in Southern Michigan,"
Thurs., May 20, 2047 Museums Bldg., at
9 a.m. Chairman, J. S. Rogers.
Doctoral Examination for Su-Ying
Liu, Botany; thesis: "Studies of Litchi
chinensis Sonn.," Thurs., May 20, 1139
Natural Science Bldg., at 9:30 a.m.
Chairman, H. H. Bartlett.
Concerts
University Choir and Symphony Or-
chestra, conducted by Maynard Klein,
will perform Verdi's Requiem at 8:30
Thursday evening, May 20, in Hill Audi-
torium. Soloists will be Ruth Orr, so-
prano, Arlene Sollenberger, contralto,
Harold Haugh, tenor, and Stanley
Kimes, bass. The general public will be
admitted without charge.
Carillon Recital, Thursday evening,
May 20, 7:15, by Percival Price, Uni-
versity Carillonneur. The program will
include Bach's Presto, from the "Glock-
enspiel" Toccata, Stephen Foster's Old
Black Joe, and Old Folks at Home;
Sonata for Thirty Bells by Percival
Price; Variations on two sacred airs;
Price's Variations on an Air for Bells
by Percival Price; Variations on two
sacred airs; Price's Variations on an
Air for Bells by Sibelius, and three
folk songs.
Exhibitions
Museum of Art, Alumni Memorial
Hall. Student Exhibition. College of Ar-
chitecture and Design. May 6-26. Mu-
seum hours: 9-5 on weekdays, 2-5 on
Sundays. The public is invited.
Events'Today
Psychology Club. There will be a cof-
fee klatsch this afternoon at 3 p.m. in

627
814

S. Main
S. State

NOW:

The Spring Issue of

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1304 S. U.
Phone NO 3-4185

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I nter-Arts Magazine

is on Sale at

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POETRY *

ART 0 DRAMA * FICTION * LITERATURE

:1

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Consult Your Local Railroad Ticket EASTE
Agent Well in Advance of Departure
Date for Detailed Information RAILRO

"A

(PAID POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT)
Open Letter to the Campus
WE BELIEVE this country belongs to all its citizens, and
its welfare depends upon the productivity of, the taxes
paid by, the military services rendered by, ALL its citizens.
We therefore believe that all its citizens should have equal
opportunity to enjoy all its benefits. We believe those prac-
tices (e.g. discrimination in employment and service because
of race, creed, or color) that deprive some of our citizens of
this opportunity, are undesirable. To eliminate some of
these practices in Ann Arbor, the University of Michigan
Chapter of the N.A.A.C.P. is initiating the sticker campaign
that was approved by a referendum in the 1953 fall elec-
tion of the Student Legislature. The purpose of the cam-
paign is to translate into action those practices which logic,
our philosophy, and our Constitution tell us are right. We
will distribute to those merchants who do not use dis-
criminatory practices in hiring or service, a sticker bearing
the slogan "Fair Play the Wolverine Way." This sticker is
not 4designed to encourage the non-discriminating mer-

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JACKETS

* Navy Blue only
*Light Gold

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