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May 13, 1954 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-05-13

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PAGE SIM

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

MAY, MAY 14, 1954

PAGESIXTHE ICHGANDAIL FRDAY MAY14,195

. ..

YD's Opposei
Suspensions
At a recent meeting the Young
Democrats unanimously passed a
resolution condemning the suspen-
sion of three University faculty
members as a result of their ap-
pearances before the Clardy com-
mittee, Monday.
The resolution states that the
YD's believe the "existence of edu-
cational institutions independent
of political and governmental con-
trol is essential for the mainte-
nance of a free society."
As a result the group deplores
the action of the University in sus-
pending three faculty members fr
refusing on legal and constitu-
tional grounds to cooperate with
the House Committee on Un-
American Activities.
"We strongly urge the Univer-
sity to. reinstate these men
Injured Students
In Good Condition
Norman S. 'Don, '56, was listed
in good condition and Carl E. Lind-
low, '54E, in satisfactory condi-
tion in University Hospital yester-
day following an automobile acci-
dent Wednesday.
The two students had received
head and spine injuries, fractures
of the left arm and multiple
bruises when their car, apparently
traveling at high speed, had skidd-
ed off Stadium Blvd.,
Korean Veterans
Korean war veterans Nho were
discharged or separated from serv-
ice before August 20, 1952, and
have not taken advantage of the
GI training benefits must enroll
in an approved program of train-
ing before August 20 in order to
continue studies afterward, ac-
cording to the Veterans Adminis-
tration.
Information on the program
may be acquired from the VA in-
formation service at 310 E. Jeffer-
son Ave.; Detroit 32, Mich.
II

ACTING EXPERIENCE:
Kim Stanley Favors
Schools Over Stock

By PHYLLIS LIPSKY
Speaking from a backgroundI
that includes work in stock com-
panies and legitimate theater as
well as experience at universities
and professional drama schools,
Kim Stanley feels that schools for
acting offer more valuable ex-
perience to young actors than
summer stock.
In stock companies where re-
hearsal time is limited to one
week, there is not enough time "to
explore a role as a young actor
should" in order to find what Miss
Stanley termed "the core of the
character."
SUMMER stock work is 'fun and
exciting," she said, but because
actors are constantly working
against time "its not very condu-
sive to creative work."
Speaking of her role in the
current production of "The Trip
to Bountiful" at the Lydia Men-
delssohn Theater. Miss Stanley
said "I was very anxious to do it.
I've never played anything vague-
ly like it before-anything vil-
linous."
Miss Stanley plays Carrie Watts,
selfishly motivated daughter-in-
law, in the Drama Season's first
production.
* * *
THE YOUNG actress' only re-
gret is that before taking over the
role she was limited to a one week
rehearsal schedule similar to the
situation in stock theaters.
She had to use time on the stage
during the plays two week run in
Evanston, before its arrival in Ann
Arbor "as I would a rehearsal."
"An actor works on oniy one
facet of a character for a partic-
ular rehearsal," she explained.
"It's not a finished perform-
ance," not the kind of perform-
ance she would like to give anS
dI

audience-but she had to do this
"in order to grow into the part."
SHE DESCRIBED local audi-
ences at the drama season produc-
tion as "very attentive."
'You can always tell about an
audience-just before the curtain
goes up," she said.
But an audience often depends
on the play, she pointed out.
Citing Tennessee William's
"Camino Real" as an example,
the Texas born actress said,
"Four of my favorite plays have
failed recently in New York,
not because of audience re-
sponse, but because of mixed re-
views."
Thieme To Lecturea
Prof. Frederick P. Thieme of
the anthropology department will
speak at 8:30 p.m. today in Audi-
torium B of Angell Hall in the
last of a series of lectures entitled1
"Man and the Universe."
The talk, sponsored by the as-
tronomy department, will be fol-
lowed by observations of the Moon
and Jupiter with telescopes and
binoculars.
LO W VCOSTC
Radios, Television I
Three Speed Phonographs
Portables, Hi Fi Phonographs
The TV Studio
1317 South University

Book Fair
A book sale sponsored by the
Friends of the Library will be
held from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.
tomorrow at the .eal House,
343 S. Fifth.
Special features of the Book
Fair are the Beal Electric car,
one of the earliest forms of
auto transportation, and the
Monroe County Bookmobile, an
example of one way in which
a library can extend its services
All proceeds will be used for
library purposes.

FUND-RAISING CAMPAIGN B3E(
Ta Daly

a

- --0/

Spanish Club
Elects Officers
Election of officers, award of a
scholarship to Mexico and a poetry
contest highlighted a Spanish
Club's meeting this week.
New officers are Ann BanAler,
'55, president; Carolee Dickey, '55,
vice-president; Marjorie Green-
field, 56, secretary; and Suzanne
McLaughlin, treasurer.
Lois Wasserman, '54, is this
year's winner of the scholarship to
summer schcool at the University
of Mexico, given by the club on
the basis of the amount of wrok
done for the organization, finan-
cial need and scholastic achieve-
ment.
TRADE BOOKS
Gardening, Travel, Cook-
books, Novels, Biography.
Sports
OVERBECK BOOKSTORE
1216 So. University
Phone NO 3-4436

INS:

I.

Drive Opens
Raised Contributions To Aid
SUniversity Fresh Air Camp
Boys' Adjustment Problems Provide
Experience for Student-Counselors
Professors, students and townspeople will man buckets as the
84th annual Tag Day drive officially opens at 8 p.m. today.
Staged yearly, the fundaraising drive helps to send under-
privileged boys to the University Fresh Air Camp.
* * * *
ABOUT 240 BOYS between the ages of seven and 14 come to
the camp each summer, referred by some 25 co-operating school,
social and case work agencies.
Each agency works with the boy before he comes to camp,
and selects him because of his need for specialized camping.
When he returns after camp, the agency continues treatment.
The boys themselves present a wide range of behavior prob-
{> lems. Some are having difficulties in school, some in the home and
some in the community at large.
SOME OF THE BOYS come from institutional placement or
foster homes. Many are the products of broken homes, and some
have acquired records as minor delinquents. Occasionally, the camp
represents the opportunity for the boy to be away from the pres-
sures and stress of an unfortunate environment. More often, the
boys have already developed symptoms of maladjustment, sometimes
severe and deeply rooted.
Th* Fresh Air Camp was established by the University as
a summer workshop for seniors
and graduate students in edu-
cation, sociology, psychology,
, and other related fields.

CABINS AWAIT EAGER CAMPERS

Engraved
Commencement
Announcements
"JOTTER"
Parker Ball Point Pens
MORRILL'S
314 S. State St.
Phone NO 8-7177

gARTISANS
Hand Thrown
j.Ceramics
by
Abernathy, Lopez, Orear,
Tak aetu_
from $3.50
SOUTH UNIVERSITY
Next to the Bank
t)o O Q=t) YCOm s

PURCHASE FROM "PURCHASE"
RLLEICORD' IV
F 3.5. Schneider Xenar lens in Syncro Compur Shutter;
Full M-X Flash Synchronization
$149.50 with case
$14.95 DOWN
Purchase Camera Shop
111 6 South University

Working hand and hand With
the social agencies sponsoring the
boys, the camp provides the stu-
dents with an integrated exper-
ience of theory and practice in
dealing with childhood maladjust-
ment.
ONE OF THE special advant-
ages of the camp setting is that
the student-counselor will have
an opportunity to watch the boys
with whom he works operate in
groups. This opportunity to study
the individual's response in soli-
tary and group situations is im-
portant in evaluating mediums for
the camper's subsequent treat-
ment.
However, officials do not lose
sight of the fact that the boys
are coming for a vacation and
the camp, located on Patterson
Lake 24 miles northwest of Ann
Arbor, features all the camp-
ing activities that can be crowd-
ed in the limited time including
swimming, arts and crafts, over-
nights, cookouts and baseball and
ether sports.

I

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BUSY HANDS WORK ON PROJECTS

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TWO-DAY
SPECIAL!
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
MAY 14 AND 15
WOMEN'S
WHITE BUCKS
and SADDLES
BY BELGRADE

4

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4

SAILING PROVIDES A FAVORITE PASTIME

V 99SIZES 41/ TO 1(

CAMPERS ENJAY A MORNING SPLASH

4

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WIDTHS AAA TO B

A $6.95 VALUE

0

COOL CORDS

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