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February 14, 1954 - Image 8

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-02-14

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PAGE EIGHTT

TIE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 1954

Butterflies'
In Stomach
Diagnosed

I

Judiciary
Three men and two women
will be appointed to the Joint
Judiciary Council on the basis
of petitions now available at
the Student Legislature Bldg.
Judiciary members must have
at least 60 credit hours. The
petition return deadline is Wed-
nesday.

Spontaneous hypoglycemia, com-
monly described as "butterflies in
the stomach" or a "hunger-like
feeling in the pit of the stomach"
frequently hits people whose jobs
keep them on the go, said Prof.
Jerome W. Conn, of the Medical
School.
People usually remedy this feel-
ing with a candy bar or soft drink.
But this is the wrong thing to take,
advised Prof. Conn. For this con-
dition signifies an excess of in-
sulin of a non-organic origin in
the body. And the increase of sug-
ar in the blood after the consump-
tion of the candy bar excites the
pancreas glands into faster pro-
duction of insulin with frightening
results.
* * *
"IT WOULD be better to take
a glass of milk instead, or any high
protein foods with low carbohy-
drates to counteract those late-
morning or late afternoon shakes,"
said Prof. Conn.
This condition which is fre-
quently diagnosed as psychon-
eurosis, or the visibly results of
worry and anxiety, can be re-
lieved by proper diet, he explain-
ed.
"The diagnosis of hypogylcemia
and the characteristic group of
symptoms which accompany it is
often a delicate matter," Prof.
Conn said, "acnd the family phy-
sician should consider it carefully
before dismissing it as merely emo-
tional or immediately labeling it
organic."

GU' Research.
Finds Cure
For 'Smog'
University scientists have re-
cently come up with a partial solu-
tion for a modern problem which
has been plaguing mankind for
over 700 years-smog.
On the basis of research being
done by the University Engineer-
ing Research Institute, industrial
plant designers can now tell how
high to build, their smoke stacks
and what gas velocity to use in
order to put smoke and gaseous
waste out of reach of air cur-
rents which might bring the un-
pleasant and dangerous material
near the ground, where it would
combine with fog to become
"smog."
* * *
IN THE research, being done by
Prof. Robert H. Sherlock and other
members of the civil engineering
department, the necessary height
of smoke stacks is determined by
tests in a wind tunnel.
A scale model of the prospec-
tive plant and its surrounding
buildings is set up to be photo-
graphed as smoke is blown across
the model in the way it will be
when the plant is in operation.
Prof. Sherlock has been doing
research in this field since 1934.
WPAG To Show
Student TV Film
A student-produced film, "Cam-
pus Criss-Cross," will be shown at
7:30 p.m. tomorrow on WPAG-TV.
The program will also include
an interview with City Councilman
Ronald E. Hinterman.

Oppenheim
Talks to Bar
Prof. S. Chesterfield Oppenheim
of the Law School recently return-
ed from Washington, D. C. and
New York where he addressed the
sixth annual meeting of the New
York State Bar Association's sec-
tion on anti-trust law.
As the co-chairman of the Attor-
ney General's Committee to Study
the Antitrust Laws: Program and
Progress, Prof. Oppenheim ex-
plained the objectives and func-
tions of what he termed "the most
comprehensive survey of antitrust
laws since the passage of the Sher-
man Act."
Prof. Oppenheim emphasized
that although the committee's task
is to analyze and evaluate the
fundamentals of national anti-
trust policy, that "doesn't neces-
sarily mean overhauling laws."
Representing a wide range of view-
points, the committee may only
make recommendations for amend-
ment or better ways and means of
interpretation, administration or
enforcement.
ConfabSlated
On Education
The first meeting of a five ses-
sion forum on college and univer-
sity teaching will be held at 3 p.m.
February 19 in Auditorium C, An-
gell Hall.

Joint
Judiciary
S tatement
(Continued from Page 1)
to harsh and undue criticism
and publicity and :the resultant
blemish on their character and
records.
These same considerations ap-
ply equally to such groups that
might be involved in misconduct.
Also, publicity directed toward one
or more specific groups or organi-
zations might result in uncon-
trolled ramifications on groups or
persons not directly involved.
In addition it is felt that such
publicity would be detrimental to
the interests of 'the University.
CERTAIN other considerations
are not to be overlooked. Were
such publicity to be forthc~oming
from either the council, or the
Sub-Committee there is a definite
possibility that it would be felt
as an additional penalty and pun-
ishment on the people involved.
Also certain cases would undoubt-
edly receive unequal public chas-
tisment.
These factors would, without
question, reduce the attitude of
cooperation which now exists
towards the two disciplinary
bodies.
The final consideration in the
vein is that the majority of facts
put before both committees are of
a highly confidential nature. While

Conrad Bergendoff, President ofI

i

-Daily-Don Campbell
INTRICATE AND GRACEFUL-Mrs. Sunalini Devi Rojam in-
structs student in the art of Indian dance. Mrs. Rajam will hold
classes in the dance this semester at the Madelon Pound House
for all those interested. A professional dancer and teacher, she
has had her own school in Bombay, with the Russian prima bal-
lerian Pavola among her pupils. Applications for the Indian dance
class are now being accepted at the International Center.
STUDENTS:!
Enjoy fine food -- excellent service
TAMERLANE TERRACE
Clinton's Outstanding Restaurant

HIS SPEECH, "The Luthera.
Augustana College, in Rock Island, Church and The Ecumeniclk
Ill. will speak on "The Lutheran Movement" will open the confer-
Church-Its Heritage, Its Duty, In ence at 10:30 a.m.
Higher Education" at 7:30 p.m. to- Prof. Paul G. Kauper of the
day at the Lutheran Student Cen- law school will also address the
ter, located on the corner of Hill conference at 2 p.m. tomorrow,
and Forest. speaking on "Church and State."
Bergendoff, who is connected The conference will continue on
with the World Council of Church- Tuesday with a speech at 10 a.m.
es' Commission of Faith and Or- on "The Lutheran Church as it
der, will also speak at the Pas- Faces Current Social Problems"
tors' Conference for all National by Prof. Gerhard Lenski, of the
Lutheran Pastors of Michigan and sociology department, and an af-
Northern Ohio, which will be held ternoon address by Prof. George
tomorrow and Tuesday at the Lu- Mendenhall, of the Near Eastern
theran Student Center. department on
PUBLIC MEETING
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 1954 - 8:00 P.M.
"PRESENT THREATS
TO OUR CIVIL LIBERTIES"
HEAR...
KENNETH E. BOULDING
Professor of Economics, University of Michigan
CHARLES C. LOCKWOOD
Attorney for Lieutenant Milo Radulovich
WESLEY H. MAURER
Professor of Journalism, University of Michigan
ERNEST MAZEY
Secretary-Treasurer, Citizens' Committee Against the Trucks Law
REV. I. PAUL TAYLOR
St. Matthews Methodist Church
WESLEY LOUNGE of the METHODIST CHURCH
Corner of State and WashingtonE- Ann Arbor, Michigan
ADMISSION FREE!
Sponsored by: Civil Liberties Committee
Ann Arbor Chapter, American Civil Liberties .Union
Citizens' Committee Against the Trucks Law

Indian Dance Instruction

LUTHERAN CONFERENCE:
Bergendoff To View Role
Of Church in Education

I:

Identification and
Job Applications
Photographs

4'

Palmer Studio
208 Mich. Theatre Bldg.

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Prof. Algo D. Henderson of the not wishing in the slightest to
education school will be chairman conceal its thinking processes and
of the forum, which is planned rational, the council nevertheless
for graduate students, teaching feels that the facts upon which
fellows and faculty. It is being those rationals operate in each
sponsored by the Committee on case are not to be revealed if the
College 'Relations. council is to maintain a respected
and trusted position as a body
Prof. Harold M. Dorr of the po of reciprocal confidents.
litical science department will The Joint Judiciary Council has
present the topic of the panel on always maintained a flexibility
"The Intellectual Role of the Col- which allows each case to be de-
lege Teacher." The members of cided not only on the facts, but
the panel include Prof. Ernest F. the individual circumstances pe-
Barker, chairman of the physics culiar to each case. We feel that
department, Prof. Raymond L. it is necessary to keep the facts of
Garner of the chemistry depart- each case confidential in order to
ment, Prof. Donald G. Marquis, assure this flexibility, which will
chairman of the psychology. de- allow for individual considera-
partment and Prof. Dudley M. tions.
Phelps of the business adminis- In reaching this decision and
tration school. formulating this recommenda-
- _______ _ ____ tion we feel that we are ex-
pressing the views of members
of a disciplinary body and as
representative students and are
reflecting the best interests of
the student body. The Council
does not feel that it is its posi-
tion or that of the Sub-Commit-
tee to release the names of
groups or individuals. If groups
or individuals wish to release
such. information themselves,
this is their perogative.
In conclusion, the council wish-
es to remind the Sub-Committee
that this recommendation is an
endorsement of the past policy of
both disciplinary groups in that
the official release of reports and
violations- of conduct entailing the
release of names of groups or in-
dividuals has been the exception
rather than the rule.
Speech Bill Opens
With Comic Opera
Richard Strauss' opera "Ariadn6
I nfl ',, ~an" Ii iPr1 to ±rUm ,

Two blocks from' stoplight
Closed Thursdays - Phone
222 W. Michigan - Clinton, Mich.

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opening of the new
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swimming pool.
Collins is ready with a
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Cole of California
swim suits.
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Aius Nvaxos scneaule to run
March 2 through 6 is the speech
department's first production this
semester.
The English translation of this
comic opera is by Josef Blatt who
will conduct the performance. The
opera will be presented in con-
nection with the School of Music.
Shakespeare's "Taming of the
Shrew" will be the second produc-
tion, March 24 through 27 and
will be presented in period cos-
tume.
Eugene Hochman's "Veranda on
the Highway," winner of the 1953
Hopwood Award will be given on
April 22 through 24.
All three productions will be pro-
duced in Lydia Mendelssohn The-
ater with curtain time at 8 p.m.

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