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May 07, 1954 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-05-07

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PAGE SIB

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, MAY 7, 3954

?AGE SI~ ThE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY. MAY 7. 1!)54

a asaas of +. Fiii#ki ij iMYR 4i :l'

HOWDY DOODY: Objectives
Golton Recalls Four Years in Activities Of Council

By FREDDI LOEWENBERG
"You might portray me as a
man who has wasted half his timfe
in college."
Relaxing easily in a chair, Ro-
bert J. Golten, '54, recalled his
four years' of dabbling in various
campus activities. The retiring
Wolverine Club President and lit-
erary college vice-president has
served on the Union Opera execu-
tive committee and in Mimes and
Druids honoraries. Between acti-
vities the economics major has
managed to maintain a 3.4 average
in the honors program.
SHOPPING around for activi-
ties as a freshman, "Bob" joined
the Wolverine Club because it "of-
fered opportunities to meet peo-
ple, do something different, and
was co-educational." The pep club
presdient has enjoyed his four
years with it, even though it near-
ly landed him in jail once.
As Special Trips Chairman, he
wrote a $750 check on a local
bank without realizing that stu-
dent organization checks are in
a special account. When the
check bounced, he had some tall
explaining to do.
One of the founders of the pre-
sent Block 'M', Golten also was
vice-president before taking over
as president.
Commenting on school spirit, the
peppy president emphasized that
Michigan has just as much as any
other school. "We have the un-
derlying base," he explained, "it
just needs a good push to bring it
out.
He called the favorable results
in the recent flashcard section re-
ferendum "gratifying," because
they confirmed what he and the
other officers already believed.
* *.*
TERMED BY one of his friends
"the biggest procrastinator I
know," easy going Bob has been
nicknamed "Howdy Doody" by his
Zeta Beta Tau fraternity brothers
because of his resemblance to that
famous puppet. Denying it all, Bob
insists it is only because everyone
in the house has to have a nick-
name, ahd the "brothers" were
desperate.
The Chicagoan recalls his ear-
ly years as uneventful ones, ex-
cept for the time a bull escaped
into his back yard and had to

Former
O f

Student

ells

1'

Explained
(Continued from Page 1)
THE DEVELOPMENT Council's
preference for undesignated gifts
holds for corporations as well.
"The University would like undes-
ignated funds to feed the skinniest
goat as far as our needs are con-
cerned," Dickinson pointed out.
Generally, however, corporate
and foundation gifts come mark-
ed for specific projects-Gener-
al Motors will grant a sum for
industrial health research, Nash-
Kelvinator puts its money into
studies on food preservation.
Selling corporations on the idea
of making fuller use of the five
per cent tax-deductible margin is
another major problem for the
Council.
The first step is to develope a
philosophy, like the one Dickin-
son holds, to the effect that mutual
success rewards a marriage of busi-
ness and higher education, "in both
the economic and moral realm."
The next step is to set up a
corporations committee (one pres-
ently exists as a sub-group.of the
Special Gifts, Grants and Bequest
Committee) which will work close-
ly with the Public Relations divi-

[rish

Colleg~e
(EDITOR'S NOTE: Bill McIntyre, a
former student at the University, is the ba
now studying at Queen's College in dentia
Belfast, Ireland. This article and pic- vocatin
tures are by him.) sible
The American student is not a dence
rarity in the Old World. into thi
But there are probably as few dent i
Americans at The Queen's Uni- Plans
versity of Belfast as there are at elude a
university of comparable size in dent ce
the whole of Europe. As a matter and soc
of fact, three Americans plus stu- tion of
dents from upwards of 25 otyher every s
countries including England, Scot- to eata
land, and Wales make up only 12 a week
per cent of the student body at hall.
Queen's University. The huge re- Becau
mainder are from Northern Ire- resident
land ... over half these from the social l
city of Belfast itself. ious st
This confronts Queen's with an weekly
unalterable fact: She is not and student
cannot be a residential university many f
in the traditional sense of the through
word. Over half her 2400 students sponsor
live at home. She is what we in and eac
America would call "a street-car ed by t
school."
A T
VIEWING this situation, Queen's dramat
Vice-Chancellor, Dr. Eric Ashby, play r
a few years ago decided its obvious tions. T
ill effects ought be mitigated. The fers ma
proposal he put forth has come to duringt
be known throughout the provin- the wee
cial universities of Great Britain Society
as the "Ashby Plan." hecklin
Its aim is to keep the student both se
who lives at home on campus as sued. Iv
much as possible by providing ,,n+,

-Daily-Don Campbell

BOB GOLTEN
... * takes life easy

be lassooed and when in high
school, serving in the Illinois
Boy's State as Speaker of the
House.
Asked why he chose Michigan,
Golten gives no special reason. "I
had a friend who was planning on
coming here," he explained, and
for four years I had been hearing
nothing but low wonderful the
University was. I thought it must
really be heaven on earth."
The Chicagoan adds confiden-
tially that he almost didn't come
here because he was sick of hear-
ing about it.
IN HIS spare time, Bob enjoys
sports; golf and tennis being his
favorites because "I .can continue
them after college." Vacations are
Indian Students
Schedule Dinner
The India Students Association
will sponsor a dinner at 7 p.m.
tomorrow at Lane Hall.
Movies on India will follow the
dinner along with a floorshow con-
sisting of Indian dances.
Tickets are $1.25 for the din-
ner.

usually spent travelling with fra-
ternity brothers, whom he calls
"bad drivers."
Musing over his philosophy of
life,, Golten recommends working
hard at a job that one enjoys. This,

i

an altruistic outlook, and a "com- sion to feel out industry's interest
patible wife" add up to his for- and match it with University's
mula for happiness. need.
As for himself, Bob is consider- This set-up, plus the creation of
ing going to law school after a few 33 local advisory councils made upI
years in the army. "But if I am of alumni elder-statesmen, is the'
offered a good junior executive job framework through which the
with the chance of becoming pre- Council is now ready to proclaim
sident of the firm in a few years, the bans for business and educa-
I may accept that," he added. ltion.

MANY FACULTY MEMBERS REGARD THE TUTORIAL
APPROACH TO TEACHING AS NECESSARY

Life
sis amenities of the resi-
1 university without ad-
ng the financially impos-
solution that huge resi-
halls ought be built and
iem herded every local stu-
n attendance.
for the next five years in-
cquisition of a large stu-
nter with plenty of study
ial space and implementa-
a plan which will allow
tudent who lives at home
at least two evening meals
in the university dining
use Queen's is not a strictly
tial university, organized
ife centers around the var-
udent societies. Besides a
"hop" sponsored by the
government there are
ormal and informal dances
hout the school year, each
ed by a different society
h enthusiastically support-
he student body at large.
, * a
ALENTED and energetic
ic society presents frequent
eadings and play produc-
he Music Department of-
any concerts and recitals
the year. Very popular are
kly debates of the Literific
sessions are crowded,
g is rampant, and topies
erious and light are pur-
was recently a main speak-
e question: "This house be-
hat Christopher Columbus
have stayed at home."
all is not play at The
's University. Her degrees
known and respected
hout the Commonwealth
over a range of disciplines
ling from Philosophy and
eval French to Dentistry
nimal Husbandry. Queen's
rs, scientists, administra-
and academicians figure
nently in United Kingdom
. Her Medical School is
gest and probably the best
British Isles.
Michigan, Queen's is a
g university, expanding in
d stature every day. Her fi-
position has greatly im-
over the last decade. Huge
ildings are being construct-
his very moment; and more
nned for the near future.
d both the students and
members at Queen's
y, able, and kind. The most
g moments in an otherwise
xl year have had little to do
he University or students
but have been the result of
o co-exist with the spright-
er accent. Not that it's a
ve one; on the contrary ...
ightfully contagiousI

Purchase from "PURCHASE"
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THA C
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I Campus Calendar

er on thi
lieves t
should
But
Queen
are I
throug
and co
extend
Media
and A
lawyer
tors,
promir
affairs
the lar
in the
Like,
growing
size an
nancial
proved
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ly Ulst
repulsiv
it is fr

At a public meeting sponsored
by the Green Feather Group,
Young Democrats and Students
for Democratic Action, the subject
of "The Rights and Responsibili-
ties of Congressional Investigating
Committees" will be discussed at
3 p.m. Sunday in the Hillel Foun-
dation Chapel, 1429 Hill Street.
Speakers will include Henry Ow-
ens, Democratic candidate for
Congress and a member of the fa-
culty of Michigan State Normal
College, and Charles Lockwood, at-
tofney for Milo Radulovich.
Presented in the discussion will
be the historical background of the
Un-American Activities Committee
and the moral, legal and ethical
aspects of the hearings.
Prof. Dean B. McLaughlin is
speaking at 8:00 p.m. today at
the semi-weekly Visitors' Night
sponsored by the Department of
Astronomy, on the topic, "The
Earth-Geological."
The talk, which will be held in
Angell Hall, is an illustrated one
and will be followed, if the sky
is clear, by observations of the
Moon and Saturn.
Displays, tours, and demonstra-
tions will be featured at the Uni-
versity Hospital Day open house
from 3 to 6 p.m. Sunday.
This will give the people of Ann
Arbor an opportunity to learn more
about the hospital and the' people
who staff it. The open house will
be held in the Out-Patient Clinic
and those who attend will have the
chance to see various departments
of the hospital in action.
The Men's Glee Club will give
its 95th annual Spring Concert at
8:30 p.m. tomorrow in Hill Audi-
torium.
Philip A. Duey, director of the
club, will conduct the program.
This will be Duey's sixth time as
Glee Club conductor.
Interested in
SPORTSB
(See "PERSONAL" in
classified ads)

Selections will include works
from Luther to Frank Loesser. Al-
so on the program will be a group
of Michigan songs,
Robert Onofrey, '54SM, clarinet-
ist, will give a recital at 8:30 p.m.
today in Auditorium A. Angell
Hall.
Assisted by William Radant,
Grad., clarinetist, Edward Knob,
Grad., bassoonist, and Virginia
Cantanese, '56SM, pianist, Ono-
frey will present a program of com-
positions by Bach, Saint Saens,
Pierne, Gagnebin and Mozart.
A Music Education major, Ono-
fre will present the recital in par-
tial fulfillment of the requirements
for a Bachelor of Music degree.
The performance is open to the
public free of charge.

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