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May 06, 1954 - Image 1

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Michigan Daily, 1954-05-06

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1
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ATOMIC WAR IN
INDOCHINA?
See Page 4

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Latest Deadline in the State
VOL. LXIV, No. 150 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, MAY 6, 1954°

CLOUDY, WARMER
SIX PANG ES

Trace History
O ICmmttees.
(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the second in a series of editorials and inter-
pretive articles dealing with the question of Congressional investigating
Committees and civil liberties. Readers are reminded that the views ex-
pressed in these articles rfelect the opinions of the writer only.)
By MARK READER
What prompted the House of Representatives to set up a per-
manent standing committee on Un-American Activities?
The flash of silver shirts in Madison Square Garden or goon squads
of the German-American Bund carousing down Broadway mauling un-
suspecting citizens who looked as if they might have been Jews?
OR WAS IT the unrest in the newly formed labor unions fight-
ing bloody battles for the right to bargain collectively with their em-
ployers? Was it the strikebreaking incident at Republic Steel here in
Michigan?
Was it the Father Coughlin's jamming the airwaves with the
nausea of their Fascistic propaganda, or The Depression with its
crack-pot schemes to save an unemployed people?
The fear of revolution and the Veteran's march on Washington?
The rise of Hitler and the Bolshevic upheaval in Russia?#
It was all of this and more.
THE.1920's AND 30's brought to the nation an abandonment of an
era of relative complacency. It was th period of social and economic!
upheavals. The dormant forces of the extreme Right and Left be-
came articulate and"the political climate was rampant with radicalism.
The Depression brought to the nation a fear of the Commun-
ists and Hitler's successes on the Continent an awareness of the
Nazi phantasmagora.
Throughout these years Congress stepped into the national poli-
tical picture more and more frequently.
* * * *
THE FORERUNNER to the present House Committee on Un-I
American Activities Committee probably dates from May, 1930, when
the House called for an investigation into Communist activity.
The then Police Commissioner of New York City, Grover Wha-
len, told the House that the Amtorg Trading Corporation was dis-
seminating Communist propaganda.
The House set up a special committee to investigate Whalen's
statement with Hamilton Fish as chairman. The newly formed group
was given authority to:
"Investigate Communist propaganda in the United States and par-
ticularly in our educational institutions; the activities and membershipI
of the Communist Party of the United States; and all affiliated or-
ganizations and groups thereof ... and all entities, groups, or indivi-
duals who are alleged to advise, teach, or advocate the overthrow of
the Government of the United States ..."
* * * *
WITH THIS delegated power behind it the special committee set
to work and although it found that Whalen's charge could not be
substantiated a report of the majority members of the group urged
the outlawing of the Communist Party.
In a minority report filed by Rep. John E. Nelson of Maine he
sharply criticized the majority of his colleagues for making such
a recommendation. The House enacted no legislation as a result
of this first investigation.

SL Passes
A ntU-Iias
Resolution
Clardy Hearings
Motion Tabled
By PHYLLIS LIPSKY
By a unanimous vote Student
Legislature last night recommend-
ed that the University "refuse to
grant approval to any League
House that adheres to disciimina-
Sft r r nia "

Judie Posts
Petitions for five posts on the
Joint Judiciary Council for the
coming year may be obtained in
the Student Legislature office
of the Union and the League
Undergraduate office.
Any student with a minimum
of 60 hours of class credits who
is not holding a seat on SL may
petition. Petitions will be due
Wednesday.
World News
Roundup

aiza Baxter

Hits

At

cory practices.'
Expressing its "alarms at the By The Associated Press
recent discrimination in a Uni-!(eneva Talks . .
versity-approved League House at
1811 Washtenaw on April 24," SL GENEVA -- France and the
requested "that a clear policy be Soviet Union agreed yesterday to
enunciated by the University on start peace talks on Indochina to-
this issue.", morrow if possible and certainly by
Saturday.
Howard Judkins. one of the Ne-S
groes who had been involved, was Agreement was reached as
barrd frm reainig intheFrench Foreign Minister Geor;;es
barred from remaining in the Bidalt decided to rideot hi
League House and Ruth Spiel-Biatdeddtoreouhs
berg hou had r t when country's Cabinet crisis in Gene-
berg, who had been present when va. Bidault's decision against be-
ing present for the vote of confi-
were asked to leave, reported to dence today in Parliament was
legislators on the ncident, taken as a sign of confidence the
Cabinet would survive.
COMING at the end of a nearly *
five-hour-long session, the anti- 111(10 china War . .
discrimination motion came on the
heels of two and a half hours of HANOI - Hordes of Vietminh
debate on motions relating to the troops dug new trenches and fox-
House Un-American investigat- holes yesterday within grenade
ing Sub-Committee, which is cur- hurling distance of Dien Bien
rently holding hearings in De- Phu's dwindling barricades.
troit. A few hundred yards away, more

Subcommittee
k Communist Plan
Put Into Record
Auto Unioni InfiltrationI, Colonizing
Included in U. S. Comnunist Plot
By The Associated Press
Balza Baxter, chairman of the Michigan Labor Youth League,
yesterday told the House Un-American Activities subcommittee in
s lDetroit to "mind its own business" and verbally feuded with the
committee at every question.
During the third day of the Detroit hearings Baxter laughed at
the proceedings, called a statement by committee member Rep. Mor-
gan M. Moulder (D-Mo.) "a lie," screamed "stool pigeon" when the
testimony of a secret witness was introduced and refused to produce
records and books of the LYL.
BAXTER WON one point fromn~j
the committee when he appearedMIa t
--Daily-Betsy smith with council Milton Henry, who
NDAR REFERENDUM had been forcibly ejected by WRep. fonf 'tCN ame

ALL-CAMPUS CALE

STUDENT VOTES IN

The Legislature passed a mo-
tion stating that "we feel that
any student should as a consci-
entious citizen cooperate to the
best of his ability with any duly
constituted government authori-
ty and requested that any disci-
plinary cases which should arise
from the hearings be handled by
the Joint Judiciary Council.

French Union paratroops and tons
of supplies dropped through sheets
of rebel antiarcraft fire to bolster
the weary defenders.
Dulles Praised .
WASHINGTON - President
Dwight D. Eisenhower yesterday,
praised John Foster Dulles as the
greatest secretary of state in his
memory and sharply rejected talk

it D V
2,000 in Re

By ARLENE LISS

T 7

The witness had been told toget

After defeating several substi- o'f a major United States diplomat-
tute motions and amendments, the ic defeat at the Geneva confer-
Legislature voted to table until ence on Asia.
next week a motion on invest'gat- Pledging unqualified support for
ing procedures of the Clardy prow- Dulles, who flew back from Ge-
ers. neva Tuesday, Eisenhower told his
This issue was raised two news conference the U.S. will con-
weeks ago when a subpoenaed tinue to work for a collective se-
student, Myron Sharpe, Grad, curity arrangement for Southeast
s1m L egisla.ure 4.to ..-Asia.

asked the Legislature to take
action.
The motion, which recommend-

However, in 1934 the character of the Nazi movement in the coun- ed that the committee "be gov-
try took on serious proportions as the legions of the German-American erned in its investigations by legal
Bund began to form. procedures and principals in order
Under the sponsorship of Rep. Samuel Dickstein of New York to protect individuals involved"
the House set up another special committee for the purpose of con- was termed "vague" by some of
ducting and investigation of: its opponents and "unconstitution-
"D the extent, character, and objects of Nazi propaganda activi- al" (referring to SL's constitution)
ties in the United states, as well as outside of the legisla-
"2) the diffusion within the United States of subversive and Un- ture's jurisdiction by others. I
American propaganda that is instigated from foreign countries and Makers of the motion Leah
attacks the principle of the form of government guaranteed by our Marks, '5L, declared that in ex-
Cntttoand amining action or opinions cf in-
Constitution, andr n e td Co- dividuals, "the committee should
"3) all other questions in relation thereto that would aid Con be charged with responsibilities of
gress in any necessary remedial legislation." fairness similiar to a court."
* * * *

* * *
No Troops . ..
WASHINGTON - Secretary of
State John Foster Dulles was ze-i
ported yesterday to have told 24
key congressional leaders that theI
United States at present has no
plans whatever to send any forces
into the Indochina War.
Quadrants Tap!
Sixteen Men
Quadrants, South Quadrangle4
scholastic honorary society, tap-c
ped 16 new members yesterday.

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Approximately 2,000 ballots were;
cast yesterday in the first day of
the two-day all-campus special:
election on calendar proposals.
Voting on the Student Legis-
Student Art
On Exhibit
With watercolors, oils cast-iron
sculpture and tempera ikons, the
student art show of the Inter-Arts
Union Festival opens today in the
hall of the Architecture Building.
Consisting of works by students
from all schools of the University,
the show will run until Sunday.
The works chosen by the jury
range from realism to impression-
ism and abstraction.
An unusual feature of the show
will be a series of Greek Orthodox
ikons done in tempera with gold
decoration. There is only one por-
trait in the show, a profile of an
esthetic-looking young lady with
gold hair. Subject matter of other
pictures includes Alaskan fishing
villages as well as circus perform-
ers.
Many of the works are for sale
and prices will be indicated.

Nemerovski commented that
although yesterday's turnout
was good, a far larger vote would
be necessary if the election is to
bear any weight with the com-
mittee.
SL cabinet member Ruth Ross-
ner. '55, said the fact that there
were less booths than is normal in
a campus election would account
for the number of votes: She point-
ed out that all the boxes were full
at the end of the day.
* * *

I
f:
_
.

up by Donald P. Appell, a commit- McCARTHY STUCK to his po-
tee investigator. sition and was upheld by Sen. Karl
It was entitled "Resolution on E. Mundt (R-S.D.), acting chair.
Concentration" and called for man of the investigating subcom-
organizers and section leaders. mittee,
It said Flint was a key to strik- Meanwhile, President Dwight
ing a powerful blow against D. Eisenhower told a news con.
what it called Walter P. Reuth- ference he only hopes the na-
er's "social Democrats." tion may derive from these hear-
The document also urged con- ings advantages comparable --

i.

e 1 another lawyer.
Baxter spread a prepared lnforn ant
statement before him when he
e rtook the stand and most of his WASHINGTON --AP)- Sen. Jo-
long winded answers included seph R. McCarthy (R-Wis.) took
---repetitious portions of this the witness stand yesterday and
lature - sponsored University - fi- statement. in dramatic sworn testimony, re-
nanced referendum will continue Read into the record also was a fused to name an Army intelli-
today, purported Communist party "bat- gence officer who, he said, gave
* * * tle plan" to take over control of i him secret FBI material warning
IN AN UNOFFICIAL count tak- Michigan auto unions in 1949. of Russian spy danger at Ft. Mon-
en last night the Crary Plan was Rep. Clardy said the hitherto mouth, N.J.
leading over the other five pro- secret document was transmitted Roaring his refusal before a
posadinbyoae"fair"omajrfitypac- from the U. S. Communist Party tense throng of spectators at a
poals by a "fair" majority, ac- to all Michigan cells at the start of televised hearing, the Wisconsin
cording to Howard Nemerovski, a drive to infiltrate and colonize senator told Army Counsel, Joseph
54E, a student member of the Cal- auto unions. N. Welch:
eda'ing Committee. * * * N. elh:

CLARDY SAID the document
received in closed session Tuesday
night, was entirely new to theI
House committee and was turned

Neither you nor anybodty else
will get me to violate the confi-
dence of loyal people .. . You can
try until Doomsday."
.* * *

centration on Ford Local 600 of
BALLOT boxes are located at the United Auto Workers, which;
the Union, League, Women's Ath- has 60,000 members and claims to
letic Building, the Diagonal, An. be the largest local union in thej
gen ss. ai . ast n~uaa ~, we/'1~nua

as he put it - to what we have
suffered in international prestige
and injury to self-respect.
The President also said he

and Engineering Arch.
John Black, '54Ed, president
of the Senior Board, emphasized
the need for a large vote today.
The administration had asked
for this referendum, "therefore
it is vital that students show
they are interested," SL Presi-
dent Steve Jelin, '55, added.

world. knows nothing which would cause
Evelyn G l a d s t o n e, former him to lose confidence in Army
Garden City, Mich., school teacher, Secretary Robert T. Stevens from
stood on constitutional grounds on the standpoint of administering
all questions as to Communist Par- Army affairs.
ty membership. * * *
Mrs. Gladstone, who did admit TOLD OF THE President's re-
she went to the Univeisity of marks, McCarthy said:

p .

THE HOUSE'S ACCEPTANCE of the resolution was apparently Men honored for their scholas-+
aimed at stopping the Nazi movement from spreading here but during IFC Panhel tic achievement were David B.
the course of the debate one of the basic questions concerning such O'Brien, '56, Herbert K. C. Luke,
an act was formulated. H old Re r t'55, John M. Harlan, '55. Robert'
What exactly was an Un-American Activity? e B. Tarkington, Spec., Nickola Od-
da, Thomas C. Bleha, '56, Richard
This question was to recur time and again and still is one CucladPn a hmsC lh,'6 ihr
Interfraternity Council and Pan- B. Eisentein, '56, Jerry M. Gray,
of the sore spots in finding a rationale for the present Un-Amer- hel officers met with fraternity and '56E, and Charles B. Turner, '54.
ican Activities Committee. ;sorority presidents and faculty Others were Bruce L. Bevelheim-
The phrase also led future investigating groups a wide and vir- members during the second an- er, '56, John H. Kelsey, '55BAd,
tually undefined scope in which to conduct their probes. nual Greek Week Retreat at the Bernard D. Berman. '55, Erle
Martin Dies, in 1938 recommended another special com- Fresh Air Camp yesterday. Kauffman, '55, John F. Meyer,
mittee which was to look into Un-American activities. It was to Assembling for the discussion '56E, and Thomas T. Stapleton,
last for seven months before disbanding. But after six years this of mutual problems and issues con- '54.
committee was still going strong as a result of five House exten- cerning fraternities and sororities, Prof. Lionel H. Laing of the po-#
sionsofits ife g gsrthe group aims for better rela- litical science department was also
sions of its life.,, tions with the faculty and admin- tapped as an honorary member of
To the populace it became known as the Dies Committee, the direct istration. the group.
forerunner to the current House Un-American Activities Commit- - - - - --- ----- - -
tee. P AV' A A VAAT rr a Cd V

SL Guitlt
Student Legislature's Cinema
Guild will present "Of Mice and
Men," starring Betty Field and
Burgess Meredith, at 7 and 9
p.m. today and tomorrow in Ar-
chitecture Auditorium.
Damon Runyan's "Blood-
hounds of Broadway" with
Mitzi Gaynor, Scott Brady and
Wally Vernon will be featured
Saturday at r and 9 p.m. and
Sunday at 8 p.m.

The
niaht

ballots will be counted to-
Results of the referendum

ii

Michigan, refused to say wheth-
er she had ever been an officer{
in the Better Schools Committee.j

will be taken into consideration by[
the Calendaring Committee when
they prepare their final recom-
mendation for the Deans Confer- Iiraves lake
ence.
Final decision on a calendar : T 1/ar atb
change will be made by the Board -'--'

11 i

of Regents upon the requestz
the Deans Conference. At the ea
liest the change would go into e
feet in 1956.

It was delegated to investigate "the extent,
jectives of Un-American propaganda activities in
and more important could look into propaganda
from foreign countries but "of domestic origin."

character, and ob- 1 R1 AL
the United States"
instigated not only

-,.G AIN" 1' AIN 1 A3 1

of
:r-
f-

6

Speech Department To Give Plays

UNDER THE LEADERSHIP of Dies the committee probed Com-
munistic activities in the CIO, the American Civil Liberties Union,I
sit-down strikes, Communism at Brooklyn College and the German-
American Bund.
But the stress was placed once and for all on Communist
activity and no longer were any major House Committees to
probe Fascist movements, in the country.
The organization of the permanent committee on Un-American
Activities was pushed through the House of Representatives through,
the energies and political acumen of John Rankin of Mississippi.
At the first session of the House in January, 1945, Rep. Rankin?
introduced a bill which called for the creation of such a group.E
He managed to have the bill voted upon immediately.
* * * *
THE FIRST VOTE went against his resolution as the House voted
by division. But the Representative demanded a roll-call vote. TheI
final total was 207 members in favor as opposed to 186 against. Forty
Representatives failed to vote.
However. a breakdown of the vote reveals that 137 Repub-

By BEA NEUFELD
Three comedies varying from farce to fantasy will be presented
by the speech department in the fourth laboratory play bill at 8 p.m.
today and tomorrow in the Women's Athletic Building.
The first of the one-acts, Anatole France's "The Man Who
Married a Dumb Wife," is directed by Conrad Stolzenbach, Grad.
The farcical comedy tells of a man who, wishing that his mute wife
could speak, hires a physician to restore her tongue. After she re-
gains her speech she jabbers constantly so the husband hires the
same surgeon to deafen him.
* * * *
"THE DRAGON," directed by Arnold Stein, '54, is a highly,
farcical Chinese play adapted from an Asiatic opera. The speech
department presentation of Wen Shun T'ang's play will be based on
an Americanized version of the Oriental theater performance.
Characterized by typical Chinese theater scenery changes
and sound effects, the story is based on a simple marriage plot
complicated by superstitions. Johanna Kranold, a special student

When from out the paleface
wigwam
From behind the staring moonface
Came the slow and colemn five
booms
Telling that the evening spirit
Wanders over woods and meadows,
Lights the campfires of the
heavens,
Then the Michigamua warriors
In their feathers and their
warpaint
Soon will gather 'round the oak
tree
'Round the oak tree called the
Tappan,
There to greet the trembling
paleface
Who in number wait the bidding
Of the loud rejoicing redskins;
But, before the sung trail
To the home of Michigamua
Many trials and many tortures
First must prove their strength
and courage
Ere the redman bids them welcome
Ere he calls each paleface "Indian"
Ere the peace pipe smoke goes
skyward.
][/a 0 t il . rrrrrC n n

"The hearings were brought
on by the charges of Stevens and
John G. Adams, Army counsel.
I have no choice but to defend
my staff. I think the hearings
are a great waste of time but I
didn't call them."
McCarthy's first appearance as
witness provided one of the high-
lights of the 10-day-old airing of
his row with high Pentagon offi-
cials.
He established, through FBI
Director J. Edgar Hoover, that the
secret material in question was a
condensed version-mostly word
for word-of a spy warning the
FBI sent to Army intelligence Jan.
26, 1951.
Meanwnlle, former President
Harry S. Truman was quoted in a
news magazine yesterday as call-
ing the McCarthy-Army hearing
the "sort of thing that should be
left to Barnum & Bailey."
Triangles
From 'neath the heels of dusty
}f eet,
Within the vitals of the Arch,
The great bronze seal called loyal
man
In the dead of night to march.
So came the men of Triangles.
Once more beneath the pointed
spiires
New faces toiled with fear;
The seal of Triangles again shone
bright,
Cleansed with blood and fear.
So came:
Keith Coats

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