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May 02, 1954 - Image 4

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-05-02

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PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGA'N' DAILY

SUNDAY, MAY 2, 1954

1'AG FOR TH MIHIGA DALY SNDA, MA 2,195

League House Discrimination:
A University Responsibility

DEAN OF WOMEN Deborah Bacon seemed
to voice a rather glaring contradiction
in her comments concerning the recently-
bared discrimination practiced in League
Houses. In one section of her interview, Miss
Bacon sounded like a Southern Senator ex-
pounding the sanctity of the Sacred Ameri-
can Home, and protecting it against Com-
munists, radicals, and atheists.
"Any person in the United States or in
the Western World," she proclaims, "if it
is their own home, has the right to deter-
mine what actions and what standards
will be acceptable in their own home."
Later on in the Daily article, however,
Miss Bacon is quoted as saying "As far as
discrimination goes, the University doesn't
like it and I personally don't like it." A noble
sentiment indeed, but hardly reconcilable
with University inaction and vacillation in
regard to the entire problem of discrimina-
tion in Ann Arbor.
The hesitancy, and seeming unwillingness,
of the Administration to follow an active
anti-discrimination policy is appallingly evi-
dent in the current League House disclosures,
but is by no means limited to them. In the
recent past, one remembers University pol-
icy (or rather lack of policy, which is equal-
ly reprehensible) toward fraternity bias
clauses, union hiring discrimination, the
Alumni dinner fiasco, etc.
In answering charges of allowing dis-
crimination in some of these instances,
the University could feebly defend itself
by claiming that it had no jurisdiction.
At Hill Auditorium...
The Philadelphia Orchestra, Eugene Or-
mandy, Conductor; The Festival Youth
Chorus, Marguerite Hood, Conductor; Ja-
cob Krachmalnick, violinist; Lorne Mun-
roe, violoncellist; Compositions of Johan-
nes Brahms
SATURDAY afternoon's concert of the May
Festival never lost its interest despite the
fact that it featured works of only one
composer. The opening work, Variations on
a Theme by Haydn, Op. 56a, shows the
composer's mastery of this form even though
it was his first large scale attempt in this
form. Mr. Ormandy's performance of the
work was well calculated and a brilliant
success for both him and the orchestra.
Miss Hood and the Festival Youth
Chorus performed Eleven Songs arranged
for chorus by Robert Schumann, a con-
temporary and close friend of Brahms.
The chorus sang exceptionally well. Their
words were clearly understood, and their
ensemble on two, three, and four parts very
Sensitively balanced. Despite the difficulty
of many of the songs, very few intonation
errors occurred. For their encore they
sang Sleep, Baby, Sleep...
The "Double Concerto" is an extremely ex-
hausting work, both for the audience and
performers. Unless the concerto has the
most technically stable performers the work
becomes very taxing. The first movement
lacked the necessary stability, but this was
not the fault of the performers. The last two
movements were a brilliant success, the
second with the arching melodies beauti-
fully realized by the ensemble and the last
featuring exciting spirited rhythmic motifs
well projected by orchestra and soloists
alike. Mr. Krachmalnick was exceptionally
brilliant, playing with the sensitivity of a
truly great artist. Mr. Munroe failed to be
consistent in the flexibility of his phrases,
and his intonation at times faltered, but
the warmth of his tone and facility over-
rode the faults.
The final selection was a spirited perform-
ance of the "Academic Festival" overture.
Again the orchestra and Mr. Ormandy gave
a beautifully flexible performance.
-Fred Coulter

In the League House disgrace, it can make
no such claim.
The League Houses are directly dependent
upon the University (more specifically, the
Dean of Women) for official University ap-
proval. If they fail to get this approval, Uni-
versity women students can't live there, and
the House owners face the possibility of
complete loss of income. In other words, for
all intents and purposes. League House Land-
lords are financially dependent on the Uni-
versity.
The solution seems almost too obvious to
be stated. The Dean of Women can with-
hold official approval of Houses that prac-
tice discrimination. "Those that do" (dis-
criminate, that is) will be hit where it hurts
most: the pocket-book!
It cannot be charged that this policy
would be coercive. The University would
be merely exercising its discretion in is-
suing approval of Women's Residences.
The insertion of an anti-discrimination
clause In the criteria presently used to
determine the fitness of a residence hall
is a logical and necessary step in the com-
plete removal of discrimination in Ann Ar-
bor.
Surely no one in an enlightened academic
community can condone the tacit approval
currently given the Administration to land-
lords who practice discrimination. If Dean
Bacon is really sincere in saying that the
University and she personally are opposed to
discrimination, she would use her influence
to institute the aforementioned policy.
-Art Cornfeld
sic +
PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA, Eugene
Ormandy, Conductor. Zinka Milanov,
Soprano; Kurt Baum, Tenor.
HE CONCERT presented last night was
a potpourri of operatic excerpts, a suite
of Armenian folk tunes, and one of the most
significant and exciting of contemporary
works. The latter was the Concert Music for
Strings and Brasses by Paul Hindemith-
typically Hindemithian in its solid-as-arock
construction, and marked by distinguished
thematic material and stunning orchestra-
tion. There is nothing unduly cerebral about
this composition; the melodies are ingratia-
ting (with a distinctly jazzy flavor at times),
and the climaxes sweep one along in exhil-
arating fashion. It was played excellently,
with the brasses behaving somewhat rauc-
ously at times.
The soloists for the concert acquitted
themselves well in arias by Puccini, Mas-
cagni, and Ponchielli, and in duets by
Verdi and Mascagni. Miss Milanov Is oft-
en thought of as a brilliantly talented but
somewhat uneven singer-a contention
which was borne out by her performance.
Her singing was truly thrilling in full-
voiced passages with heavy support from
the orchestra, and less satisfactory in the
delicate voice line of Puccini's Un Bel Di.
However, this was her opening number,
and this fact probably accounts for some
of her vocal unsteadiness. Kurt Baum was
in good voice and he sang with vigor and
assurance, in the expected Italianate tra-
dition. The duets from Aida and Caval-
leria Rusticana were done in good oper-
atic style, but they demonstrated the ut-
ter futility of attempting to act on a
concert stage.
The Overture to Wagner's Die Meistersing-
er was performed with polish and intensity,
but somehow the essence of the work was
not quite realized-it was just another bril-
liant reading of the piece. The concluding
composition was the rmenian Suite by Har-
ry Yardumian. It is a pleasant work, and
the orchestration is brilliant if too highly
trumpeted. Bach's Come Sweet Death was
played movingly as an encore.
--Dave Tice

DREW PEARSON:
Washington
Merry-Go-Round
WASHINGTON-Except for dinners given
by President Eisenhower and civil de-
fense boss Val Peterson, there was little so-
cializing when the governors of the 48 states
descended on Washington for their annual
three-day conference last week.
The governors were given a grim and
thorough briefing on such security ques-
tions as the danger of all-out war in In-
do-China, necessity for integrated civil
defense, and the diffusion of war plants,
if the nation is attacked from without.
However, the state executives enjoyed
some lighter moments during their off-the-
record meetings, including a story by Cali-
fornia's gregarious GOP Governor Goodwin
Knight. Discussing the possibility of raising
living standards in nations threatened by
Communism, Knight remarked:
"I am a firm believer in the theory that
an extra bowl of rice is often a deterrent to
Communism. But I think we also should see
to it that countries on both sides of the iron
and bamboo curtains are well indoctrinated
with the story about the East Berlin dog
who paid a visit to West Berlin.
"West Berlin dogs asked him about ca-
nine conditions in the Soviet Zone and he
began to brag at great length about how
the Russians provided heated kennels and
hamburgers three times a day.
"'But if you have it so good in East Ber-
lin why do you come over here'? inquired
his West Berlin cousins.
"'Oh,' he replied, 'I just wanted to bark',"
*k*M *
JOINT CHIEFS DEADLOCKED
A VITALLY important peace-or-war debate
has been taking place inside the Joint
Chiefs of Satff regarding the issue of Indo-
China. The result is a complete deadlock.
On one side Admiral Arthur Radford,
dynamic chairman of the Joint Chiefs,
wants the United States to intervene ac-
tively with sea and air power.
On the other side, the Chiefs of Staff for
the Army, Navy and Air Force vigorously
and solidly disagree. Here is a survey of
their views:
Army Chief of Staff Matt Ridgway argues
that ground troops ultimately will be called
in to finish any U.S. intervention in Indo-
China and he warns that the budget-slashed
Army is no longer strong enough to support
a bared-teeth policy.
The Chief of Naval Operations, Admiral
Bob Carney, fears his aircraft carriers
might get bottled in the narrow confines
of the Tonkin Gulf. One end of the gulf
is already plugged by a huge Chinese air
base on Kwangtung Peninsula which juts
like an infected tonsil into the Gulf, prac-
tically sealing off the northern exit.
As for the Air Force, General Nate Twin-
ing has taken a flat stand against all peri-
pheral wars-in other words, small isolated
wars. The Air Force position was first advo-
cated inside Pentagon councils by the late
Chief of Staff, General Hoyt Vandenberg.
His words have never been made public, but
they are extremely significant because his
advice, in effect, was to wage war-if war
was necessary-directly at the source of the
trouble-Moscow.
This column can now report the exact
words of the late Air Force Chief of Staff.
HEART OF THE TROUBLE
"PERHAPS THE time has come for the
United States ... to go back to the days
when the Barbary pirates asked us for ran-
som and we said, 'No soap,'' pleaded Gen-
eral Vandenberg.
"There's one thing I'm sure of and that is:
as far as the United States Air Force is con-
cerned, even with the projected strength of
it, we are not big enough to put out fires all
over the world, around the periphery of
trouble," Vandenberg continued.
"Sooner or later," prophesied Vandenberg,
"We're going to find out that as these peri-
pheral areas start blazing and start enlarg-
ing, we will come to a time where the mili-

tary will have to tell the country that there
isn't enough strength and the alternative is
all-out mobilizatoin, which means war any-
way."
(Copyright, 1954, by the Bell Syndicate)

y _3

C
STATESMANSHIP
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M11...TO-

V

"Anybody Home Here?"

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gib':< .,:: ; ,

SECOND SEMESTER
EXAMI NATION SCHEDULE
University of Michigan
COLLEGE OF 4lITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
HORACE H. RACgKHAM SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES
COLLEGE: OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES
SCIHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
PCHOOL OF NURSING
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
'May 29 to June 9, 1954
For courses hav.ing both lectures and recitations, the 'time
of class' is the time of the first lecture period of the week. For
courses having recitations only, the 'time of class' is the time of
the first recitation period. Certain courses will be examined at
special periods as noted below the regular schedule.
Courses not incladed in either the regular schedule or the
special periods may ui.;e any examination period provided there is
no conflict or provided that, in case of a conflict, the conflict
is resolved by the cla!s, which conflicts with the regular schedule.
Degree candidates with a scheduled exam falling on June 7,
8 or 9 will be given an examination at an earlier date. The
following schedule desgnates an evening time for each such per-
iod. The instructor may arrange. an alternate time with notice to
the scheduling committee.
REDULAR EXAM TIME
Mon. Tues. Tues. Wed. Wed. Mon.
June 7 June 8 June 8 June 9 June 9 June 7
a.m. a.m. p.m. a.m. p.m. p.m.
SPECIAL PERIOD FOR. DEGREE CANDIDATES
Mon. Tues. Wed. Thurs. Fri. Sat.
May 31 June 1 June 2 June3 June 4 June 5
7-10 p.m. 7-10 p.m. 7-10 p.m. 7-10 p.m. 7-10 p.m. 7-10 p.m.
Each student should receivie notification fron his instructor
as to the time and plane of his examination.

121

k

G

i

i

Xletter TO THE EDITOR
The Daily welcomes communications from its readers on matters of
general interest, and will publish all letters which are signed by the writer
and in good taste.. Letters exceeding 300 words in length, defamatory or
libelous letters, and letters which for any reason are not in good taste will
be condensed, edited or withheld from publication at the discretion of the
editors.

Correction *. .
To the Editor:
WOULD LIKE to explain why
the letter of Sat., May 1, which
the organization wanted signed
N.A.A.C.P., appeared with my
name. I delivered the letter to the
editor signed N.A.A.C.P. and left.
Because the Daily has a policy of
printing only letters with names
on it I would like to make it plain
to the public that it was not my
letter but it was the letter of and
expressed the views of the N.A.A.-
C.P.
-Willie B. Hackett
McCarthy Misquotes .. .
To the Editor:
IN WILLIAM BUCKLEY'S recent
apologia (based on the doctrine
that the end justifies the means)
for McCarthy, McCarthy and His
Enemies, there appears the state-
ment, "It is indeed characteristic
of McCarthy that he put into di-
rect quotes what amounts to his
own paraphrase of someone's po-
sition." A typical example of this
falsification was given in last
Tuesday's panel on McCarthy.
Near the end of the audience-
question period the pro (McCar-
thy) side read what McCarthy said
(lied) was a quote from Lincoln.
As reported by James Reston in
the N.Y. Times of Nov. 29, 1953,
McCarthy pulled the quote out of
context, garbled it, eliminated a
reference to a "nation of free
men," and then used the doctored
quote to support his contention
that the great danger to America
is from Communists operation
from within. The rest of McCar-
thy's speech (Nov. 25, 1953) was
a defense of his method, his means
of rooting out Communists.
Now, in the Lincoln speech re-
fered to (Jan. 27, 1838), Lincoln
was not urging that good ends jus-
tify any means. In fact, in the
whole speech he was arguing pre-
cisely the opposite-that we must
be careful of the means we use.
Lincoln was worried at the time
not about subversion by agents
of a foreign power, but about sub-
version by fellow Americans who
disregard civil rights. He warned
against the tendency of men to
make personal estimates of guilt,
pass judgment on their fellow
Sixty-Fourth Year
Edited and managed by students of
the University of Michigan under the
authority of the Board in Control of
Student Publications.
Editorial Staff
Harry Lunn .......Managing Editor
Eric Vetter..................City Editor
Virginia Voss..........Editorial Director
Mike Wolff........Associate City Editor
Alice B. Silver. Assoc. Editorial Director
Diane D. AuWerter.. .. Associate Editor.
Helene Simon.......... Associate Editor
Ivan Kaye..............Sports Editor
Paul Greenberg... .Assoc. Sports Editor
Marilyn Campbell...Women's Editor
Kathy Zeisler....Assoc. Women's Editor
Chuck Kelsey ......Chief Photographer
Business Staff
Thomas Treeger......Business Manager
William Kaufman Advertising Manager
Harlean Hankin....Assoc. Business Mgr.
William Seiden...... .Finance Manager
Anita Sigesmund..Circulation Manager
Telephone NO 23-24-1

men, and take the law into their,
own hands.
The frightening aspect in this
instance is that McCarthy's lie
was inadvertantly repeated last
Tuesday night by Prof. Weaver
Charles Sleicher, Grad
* * *
Lily Gilded,...
To the Editor:
WAS pleased by the recent
statement of Lily Pons as re-
ported in the Daily to the effect
that she would sing here essen-
tially the same program as in a{
large metropolitan city. Indeed.
If the implication here is that we
are thus spared Home Sweet Home
everyone should be satisfied. It
would appear, however, that cer-
tain other performers, lacking
Lily's perception, have program-
med mostly musical works of such
nature as to renew my faith in
the provincial nature of the Ann
Arbor public, musically speaking.
-David Kessel, for Gargoyle
Immorlity? , .,
To the Editor:
IT HAS BEEN called to the at-
tention of several people on this
campus that the Inter-Arts Union
is producing two student-written
plays of dubious moral character
next Saturday evening. This is
probably an dndication of the mor-
al concerns of the average writer
today. But why must we condone'
this sort of thing in an educa-
tional institution? There are
enough Tennessee Williamses and
Erskine Caldwells throwing their
literary weights around without
encouraging young people to fol-
low in their bawdy footsteps.
We wonder what kind of people'
it takes to act in immoral and
hopeless dramatic productions?
Perhaps this is also an indication
of the lack of character becoming
prevalent in the artist of today. It
is our suggestion that all consci-
entious people stay away from
these plays next Saturday.
-Bill Lawrence
Frank Podleski
Louis Rodriguez
'1

REGULAR-SCHEDULE
(at 8 Tuesday, June 1
(at 9 Saturday, May 29
(at 10 Monday, May 31
(at, 11 Wednesday, June 2
(at 1 Friday, June 4
(at 2 Thursday, June 3
(at 3 Saturday, June 5

MONDAY
TUESDAY

9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5

(at 8
(at 9
(at 10
(at 11
(at 1
(at 2
(at 3

Wednesday, June 2
Saturday, May 29
Thursday, June 3
Friday, June 4
Tuesday, June 1
Monday, May 31
Saturday, June 5

SPECIAl, PERIODS
Literature, Science and the Arts

Economics 51, 52, 53, 54
English 1, 2
Sociology 51, 54, 60, 90
Chemistry 4, 8, 23
Spanish 1, 2, 31, 32
Russian 2
Political Science 2
Psychology 31
Botany 1, 2, 122
French 1, 2, 11, 12, 31, 32, 61, 2
German 1, 2, 11, 31, 32

Monday,
Tuesday,
Tuesday,
Saturday
Monday,
Monday,
Monday,
Tuesday,
Tuesday,

May 31
June 1
June 1
June 5
June 7
June 7
June 7
June 8
June 8

Wednesday, June 9
Wednesday, June 9

COLLEGE CF ENGINEERING
Economics 53, 54 Monday, May 31
E.E. 5 Tuesday, June 1
M.I.E. 135 Wednesday, June 2
P.E. 11, 12, 31, 32, 131 Thursday, June 3
C.E. 2 Friday, June 4
C.E. 21, 22 Saturday, June 5
Chemistry 4 Saturday, June 5
C.E. 151 Monday, June 7
E.M. 1, 2 Monday, June 7
Draw. 1 and Draw. 2, Group A Monday, June 7
English 11 Tuesday, June 8
Draw. 2, Group B Tuesday, June 8
Draw. 3 Wednesday, June 9

2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
9-12
9-12
2-5
9-12
2-5
9-12
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
9-12
2-5
9-12
2-5
9-12
9-12
2-5
9-12
2-5
9-12

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

-c u

SPECIAL IN.rRUCTIONS
LITERATURE, SCIEI CE AND THE ARTS
No date of Examination may be changed without the con-
sent of the Committee on Examr Anation Schedules.
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
No date of examination may be changed without the con-
sent of the Classification Commkt.tee. All cases of conflicts be-
tween assigned examination perikds must be reported for ad-
justment. See bulletin board outside Room 301 West Engineer-
ing Building between May 3 and ,May 15 for instruction.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Individual examinations will be given for all applied music
courses (individual instruction) .lected for credit in any unit
of the University. For time and place of examinations, see bulle-
tin board in the School of Music.
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECOTURE AND DESIGN
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
SCHOOL OF EINUCATION
COLLEGE OF P7ARMACY
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Courses not covered by this schedule, as well as any neces-
sary changes, will be indicated on ithe School bulletin board.

f:

(Continued from Page 2)

t the Michigan .,.
EXECUTIVE SUITE
EXECUTIVE SUITE is a 104-minute look
at the happenings on the top floor of a
large business organization. It is undoubted-
ly the best film of its type, and probably one
of the finest suspense stories ever made.
When Tredway Furniture president Avery
Bullard dies without appointing an executive
vice-president, the seven member Board of
Directors meets to elect the company's new
head from among its own ranks. Fredric
March, a money-mad treasurer, wants the
presidency so that he can increase annual
earnings. His chief opponent is William
Holden, at a disadvantage because of youth
and inexperience. The five other members
back up their choices for personal reasons
in some cases, and in other instances for
what they believe is the company's good.
The film builds up to an intensive ex-
citement as the directors try to impose
their own views on the other board mem-
bers. There is a great deal of complexity
both in the individual characters and in

plicate their choices, while others are only
seriously interested in their own well be-
ing. This might easily confuse the viewer,
but Director Robert Wise manages to
clearly define all the relationships and to
make each scene logically follow the pre-
ceding one.
Unlike most films, Executive Suite has no
background music. No "sighing violins" un-
derscore the romantic scenes; no crescen-
doing studio orchestra attempts to heighten
dramatic moments-it is the actors and the
ever-probing camera that must always set
the mood. Fortunately the performers are
all skilled. Some of them (Barbara Stan-
wyck and June Allyson) play roles with
which they are long familiar; others (Holden
and March) have parts that challenge their
abilities. But all are uniformly excellent.
The stark black-and-white lensing effective-
ly adds to the film, providing movement and
keeping the film from becoming static. Hol-
den, incidentally, performs the final scene
with admirable restraint. His plea for co-
operation could easily have become hammy.

or it tries to tell it entirely in human terms,
of group relationships within, say, a squad.
,In the first kind we lose the sense of the
individual, in the second, of the war. A
Walk In The Sun is not an ordinary war
movie. Its director, Clarence Brown, man-
ages effectively to play the war situation
against "whole" characters.
The action takes place in twelve hours,
from midnight, when a certain squad is
approaching an Italian beachhead in
their landing barge, till noon, when they
take their objective, a farmhouse and a
bridge. The farmhouse is the movies'
dramatic focus. Without ostentation, it
symbolizes all that the men aspire to
and fear, containing, as it does, both
German machine guns to kill them, and
apples to satisfy their craving for apples.
This restraint is, in fact, one of the most
gratifying things about the movie. When a
phrase or a camera shot is repeated, it seems
always to have some purpose.
The cast is large, but its variety never de-
strov the nieture's unity Mostiv. the char-

p.m. Dr. Sankey L. Blanton, President
of Croser Theological Seminary, will be1
the speaker.
Evangelical and Reformed Guild.
Bethlehem Church, 7 p.m. Professor,
Kenneth Boulding will discuss "The
Church in Industry."
Hillel. Supper Club tonight at 6;
Record Dance, 7 p.m.
Unitarian Student Group. Discussion
at 7:30 Sunday evening at the Church
on the philosophical implications of the
H-Bomb, There will be transportation
from Lane Hall between 7:15 and 7:30
p.m. Refreshments.
Grace Bible Guild. SundayrSchool
Class meets at 10 a.m. with Dr. Pike
leading a study in the book of Ro-
mans. Guild supper at 6 p.m. at which
time nominations will be made for
officers for next year.
Scabbard and Blade Rushing Smoker;
Sunday, May 2,1954, at 1400 in the
League. Room to be posted on the
League Bulletin Board. Uniforms will
be worn.}
Coming Events
The Science Research Club. The May

The complete schedule is as follows:
Lillian Gish in "The Trip To Bountiful"
with Kim Stanley and John Conwell,
May 10-15; June Lockhart and John
Dall in "Gramercy Ghost," May 17-22;
Arthur Miller's new play "The Cru-
cible" with E. G. Marshall, May 25- 29;
Barbara Bel Geddes in "The Little Hut"
with Hiram Sherman, May 31-June 5;
John Baragrey and Paul McGrath in
"Sabrina Fair," June 7-12. Evening
performances are at 8:30 p.m., mati-
nees Thursday and Saturday at 2:30
p.m. Box office hours will be from 10
a.m. to 5 p.m. daily this week.
Business Education Students and
Those Interested in Business Teacher
Education. There will be a coffee hour
at 3:30 p.m., May 4, in the Homemak-
ing Rooms of the "Corner House" at
norner of East University and South

As;'aembiy Dormitory Council. Meet-
ing Monday afternoon at 4 in the
League.
Dewtmouth College Alumni and other
intemaisted people are invited to a spec-
ial ra-eview of the film My First week
at E4trtmouth, which will be held on
Mon.. May 3, at 4 p.m., at the University
Audi o-Visual Center Auditorium, Ad
minisstration Building, 4th floor.
Museum Movie. "Miracle on the Me-
sa." fl ee movie shown at 3 p.m. daily
inductling Sat. and Sun. and at 12:30
Wed., 4th floor movie alcove, Museums
Build ing, May 4-10.
Deu tscher Verein--Kaffeestunde will
meet tomorrow at 3:15 in the Union
alcove.. Prof. O. G. Graf and Mr. W.
nvr .nhar of- ta C,,- Dng--

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