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April 25, 1954 - Image 4

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-04-25

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PAGE FOrR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

'A"TTviri&V AVI*lFi.')X Y4kA

1H I H G I A L Y h 1 A y * U 3 ~ I W

15UINUAX. AFICLL Z5, 1°54

Political Party Labs

DREW PEARSON:

"7NO,I CAN'T support political parties--
I'm an independent," is the common ra-
tionalization used by those who wish to
avoid soiling their hands with politics.
While priding himself on his intellectual
freedom, the independent is actually a
hindrance to our form of government. Ex-
cluded in many states from participating
in primary elections, the independent has
no choice in the selection of the candidates
he will eventually be called upon to vote
into office.
Association with a political party does not
lessen or restrict political independence to
a great degree. Both major parties harbour
many diverse factions-in fact, in many
cases the views and policies of the two par-
ties are coincident.
However, by working within a party, a
person may make known his political views,
both through his primary vote, and by par-
ticipating in party caucuses.

The political party is the core of Ameri-
can government. To actively support it is
to further the aims of government. To ig-
nor it on the basis of independence is to
hinder these aims.
Michigan students will be offered a uni-
que chance to participate in party govern-
ment tomorrow and Tuesday. Important
party leaders will be on campus during the
two days to discuss political party acti-
vity.
Sponsored by the Department of Political
Science in conjunction with Young Demo-
crat and Young Republican clubs, the pro-
gram will include panel discussions, lunch-
eons, and speakers.
By supporting either the Republican par-
ty meetings tomorrow or those of the Demo-
cratic party on Tuesday, the Michigan stu-
dent can demonstrate his interest in party
politics, and show his support for govern-
ment.
-Lee Marks

The Week on Campus

FBI INFORMANT - The melodramatic
story of Daphne Price and her informing ac-
tivities for the Federal Bureau of Investiga-
tion broke to the campus last week.
It seemed Miss Price, a former junior in
political science, had told the FBI about
the activities of Ed Shaffer, whom she had
been dating. Shaffer is one of two Univer-
sity students subpoenaed to testify at the
House Un-American Activities Committee
hearings May 10 in Lansing. He has pre-
viously avowed membership in the Com-
munist Party.
The case stirred up quite a lot of campus
reaction-varying from surprise to indigna-
tion and uneasiness. Some by-standers felt
a lack of trust in the FBI for relying on Miss
Price's information at "face value." Others
wondered just what the FBI is doing-whom
they are watching and why.
And University President Harlan H. Hat-
cher reaffirmed a policy of cooperation with
duly constituted government investigating
agencies.
* * *
CLARDY THEORY-Rep. Kit Clardy holds
an interesting theory concerning the Price
case. He called it a "publicity stunt on
Shaffer's part "to distract attention from
the hearings" and build up sympathy for
himself.
The Congressman will conduct committee
Architecture Auditorium
CERTAINLY there s no more dramatie
situation than that in which the human
mind is examined in all its complex and
sometimes deviant machinations. The Snake
Pit's representation of such a drama is so
straight that at times one feels as if they
can't face such reality without repeating
that this is just a movie.
But even if this is just a film the events
happen every day in our own mental hos-
pitals and the case of Virginia Cunning-
ham is but one of hundreds of thousands
that make us realize that human beings
are not machines.
The story takes place in a mental hospital
where Mrs. Cunningham is confined after
she has a nervous breakdown. The action
follows her treatment through all its stages
until she is considered ready to reenter the
society that originally caused her disorder.
This time, however, she knows how to deal
with her problems and, if not completely
adjusted, she realizes that there are people
whom she can call on to help her over the
rough spots.
Olivia de Havilland's portrayal of Vir-
ginia Cunningham merits consideration as
one of the truly remarkable characteriza-
tions in recent film history. Without being
incredulous she conveys the tortured work-
ings of a sick mind. Her use of facial
expressions and body movements are the
work of a highly skilled artist whose heart
is in the play.
Dr. Kik, her psychiatrist, is a sensitively
played role which corrects the mistaken im-
pression that all analysts are mysterious
Viennese figures seeking to control the world
through men's minds. Realistically enough,
his patients do not end up marrying him, no
more than one marries the person who fixes
his broken leg.
If anything, movies of this sort deserve
to be seen more often than just once.
-Dick Wolf
** * *
At the Michigran
RHAPSODY, with Elizabeth Taylor and
Vittorio Gassman
T HE ADS FOR Rhapsody call it "the love
story of the year with the world's great-
est love music." Actually, the picture tries
to cover up a pretty shoddy love story by
coating it thickly with selections from

Tchaikovsky and Rachmaninoff that have
been played almost to death. Neither story
nor musiz gains from the association.
The nature of the film, a good quarter
of which takes place in concert halls,
requires that Miss Taylor do exactly what
the furopean scenery does -- just sit
- - -J - 3 . . . . 1 . .. 4_i t _ _ ! -- A

hearings in May in Lansing and Detroit. He
also maintained that Miss Price had given
no information to his subcommittee.
* * *
UNIVERSITY VEEP-The long search for
a University Vice-President of Student Af-
fairs ended last week with the appointment
of James A. Lewis to the new post. Lewis
will step into the new administrative posi-
tion from the directorship of the University's
Bureau of School Services.
His responsibilities will lie in the field of
"coordination and development of non-
academic aspects of student life," accord-
ing to President Hatcher.
Most of the functions of the Office of Stu-
dent Affairs will be absorbed into the offices
of the Dean of Men and Women and any
leftover OSA duties will be distributed by
Lewis after he confers with administrators,
faculty and students.
* * *
SEC STUDY-Winding up five months of
study, the Student Affairs Study Committee
closed up shop and set May 6 as the date
for drawing up a draft of its findings and
recommendations on the proposed Student
Executive Committee.
Recommendations to President Hatcher
will consist of decisions already reached by
the group in its five months of open hearings.
-Becky Conrad
r mQ IE~
doing something a little bit different, like
adjusting a strap or moving her wrap.
But despite these little ploys and all the
costume department can do for her, she's
not enough of a spectacle to hold the film
together all by herself.
She plays a poor little rich girl entangled
with two musicians, one a violinist and the
other a pianist. Her problem with the first,
Vittorio Gassman, is that he's too self-suf-
ficient. No amount of ear-tweaking and
week-ending at St. Moritz will make him
forget his career. The trouble with the sec-
ond, John Ericson, is that he's not self-suf-
ficient enough. Just follows her around like
a big dog, neglecting to practise his music
and drinking up her father's money.
The story is altogether sentimental and
mechanical. "Do you think I'm a light
bulb to turn on and off whenever you
like?" asks Miss Taylor at one point, and
one feels that she and her fellow charac-
ters are very much indeed like light-bulbs,
turned on and off at the writer's discre-
tion.
Miss Taylor has come a long way from
National Velvet. But considering the small
success she has with pictures about artists,
it might have been better if she'd stuck to
horses.
-Bob Holloway
At the Staite.««
BOTANY BAY with Alan Ladd, James
Mason, and Patricia Medina.
LIKE A GOOD many motion pictures,
Botany Bay suffers from a lack of fresh-
ness. It has the same typed characters,
contrived situations, and love-conquers-all
theme that one can find in a dozen similar
films.
Rather than hang, Alan Ladd, a wrongly
imprisoned ex-medical student, accepts de-
portation to the new British colony of Aus-
tralia. With about a hundred other prisoners,
he is herded onto a ship captained by James
Mason. Captain Mason, a cruel man who de-
lights in torturing his passengers, immed-
iately clashes with poker-faced hero Ladd.
Patricia Medina, sporting a tight, off-the-
shoulder blouse, is along to provide the love
interest. Although she looks seductive, she
is really a "good" girl. Evidence: she refuses
to allow Mason to fondle her bare shoulders.
The ship's voyage is a series of violent
acts: several floggings, a stabbing, a flight,
and a special device called keelhauling.

When the boat finally arrives at the "land
down under," Sir Cedric Hardwicke, as an
overly kind governor, is on hand to par- .
don everyone. He is a sort of Australian
George Washington. But even he cannot
stand against Mason who is determined to
1 rilm h n aw - - n w-- - 7.rIA C inf m . _

Washington
Merry-Go Round
WASfTNGTON-When Secretary of State
Dulles left for Geneva he had discussed
with aides a plan to give Foreign Minister
Molotov a blunt warning that the United
States will fight, if necessary, to save Indo-
china from going Communist.
Such a warning would not be made to Mo-
lotov during public sessions of the Geneva
conference, but only in confidential, private
talks.
Behind this strategy is Dulles' belief
that the Russians must be made aware of
the fact that the United States is not bluff-
ing about Indochina. It is the same stra-
tegy which the British and French should
have employed, but did not, in regard to
Hitler; and the strategy the Truman Ad-
ministration used in regard to Russian
aggression in Europe.
Dulles is of the opinion that the Russians
agreed to a truce in Korea only after a threat
of full-scale war was passed on to Moscow
through Premier Nehru of India. He thinks
that if a- warning is given with sufficient
force in Geneva, it may get results in Indo-
china
Some of his advisers, however, are dubious.
AIRPLANE GRAVY
IT'S SUPPOSED to be a deep, dark secret,
but the President's Air Coordinating Com-
mittee has drawn up a confidential blue-
print on "national aviation policy" that is
180 degrees opposite to Ike's public stand on
aviation matters.
The secret plan is to slip the 12-page
policy paper on the President's desk in
hopes he won't read it too closely. Ike,
they know, doesn't read much. And it's
hoped he won't see how the policy- paper
flatly contradicts his own budget message
appeal for "a mcere effective review" of
airline subsidies in view of the industry's
"increasing maturity."
Instead, the ACC paper states: "Foreign
competition and other special factors will
prolong the period during which subsidy
will be required for international air trans-
portation operations."
The paper also stresses "the avoidance, or
elimination where it now exists, of exces-
sive competition between the United States
flag services."
This is nothing more than a modified ver-
sion of the same idea Pan American Airways
has been trying to sell Congress for years--
namely, the selection of one or two govern-
ment-subsidized airlines to represent the
U.S.A. abroad and eliminate competition,
Most surprising recommendation by the
President's Air Coordinating Committee,
however, is an attempt to limit the Presi-
dent's wartime powers in employing com-
mercial aircraft.
"Militarization (of civil airlines) should
be executive order of the President after
consultation and written recommendation
of the agencies involved," states the con-
fidential ACC blueprint. "In no case should
a draft executive order be presented for
Presidential signature without prior op-
portunity for review and recommendation
by affected government agencies."
This is in contrast to the warning of the
late Secretary of Defense James Forrestal,
who reported in 1947 that our airlift require-
ments on M-day-the day war begins-would
be the equivalent of 4,000 giant, C-54 cargo
planes. This is four times the present cap-
abilities of the military and commercial
cargo planes, added together, and obviously
would require drastic action by the Presi-
dent immediately.
* * *
TWO TREASURY SECRETARIES
JOHN SNYDER, ex-Secretary of the Treas-
ury, dutifully came to Washington the
other day at the invitation of the Jenner
Committee and waited patiently for them to
call him. For several days he waited, finally
was told he could go back to Toledo.
Much more courteous was Secretary of
the Treasury George Humphrey, who open-
ed up back Treasury files to the man he suc-
ceeded.

Snyder was called to Washington to be
quizzed regarding Harry D. White whom
he scarcely knew, and about anyeother
Treasury officials who might have had
liberal leanings. Not being able to remem-
ber all the records of eight years ago,
Snyder asked Humphrey to let him refresh
his memory.
"It's the kind of treatment I would expect
from my successor when I get out of thf
Treasury," said Humphrey. "It's the only
fair thing to do."
Some Jenner Committee staff membersI
seemed miffed that Secretary Humphrey wasj
so fair to ex-Secretary Snyder, though some
felt they had carried guilt by association far
enough. Anyway Snyder had a trip to Wash-
ington for nothing.
* * *
NEW HOUSING COMMISSIONERD
NORMAN P. MASON, the Federal Housing
Administrator who suddenly replaced
Guy P. Hollyday, isn't going to be any boon
to home-owners so far as interest rates
are concerned. He believes that a 9.7 per
cent interest rate is very reasonable.
Testifying regarding this before the House
Banking and Currency Committee, Mason
was asked by Congressman Wright Patman
of Texas:
"Don't you think that's a pretty high in-
terest rate?"
"If it were too high,"replied Mason, "oth-
er forces wolud come in to relieve the situa-
tion."

Creeping Localism
' -f
f ----
~'

SECOND SEMESTER
EXAMINATION SCHEDULE
University of Michigan
COLLEGE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS \
HORACE H. RACKHAM SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF NURSING
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
May 29 to June 9, 1954
For courses having both lectures and recitations, the 'time
of class' is the time of the first lecture period of the week. For
courses having recitations only, the 'time of class' is the time of
the first recitation period. Certain courses will be examined at
special periods as noted below the regular schedule.
Courses not included in either the regular schedule or the
special periods may use any examination period provided there is
no conflict or provided that, in case of a conflict, the conflict
is resolved by the class which conflicts with the regular schedule.
Degree candidates with a scheduled exam falling on June 7,
8 or 9 will be given an examination at an earlier date. The
following schedule designates an evening time for each such per-
iod. The instructor may arrange an alternate time with notice to
the scheduling committee.
REGULAR EXAM TIME
Mon. Tues. Tues. Wed. Wed. Mon.
June 7 June 8 June 8 June 9 June 9 June 7
a.m. a.m. p.m. a.m. p.m. p.m.
SPECIAL PERIOD FOR DEGREE CANDIDATES
Mon. Tues. Wed. Thurs. Fri. Sat.
May 31 June 1 June 2 June 3 June 4 June 5
7-10 p.m. 7-10 p.m. 7-10 p.m. 7-10 p.m. 7-10 p.m. 7-10 p.m.

{
{
A

TO THE EDITOR
The Daily welcomes communications from its readers on matters of
general interest, and will publish all letters which are signed by the writer
,and in good taste. Letters exceeding 300 words in length, defamatory or
libelous letters, and letters which for any reason are not in good taste will
be condensed, edited or withheld from publication at the discretion of the
editors.

I

Librory ..tr
To the Editor:

(to quote a recent letter), must in

3j
:

fairness examine the poison caus-
ing the real rot. Otherwise they

Each student should receive notification from his
as to the time and place of his examination.

instructor

Various pre-vacation issues of will labor manfully to save "our;
The Michigan Daily noted (1 way of life", only to find it has
the completion of the new women's evaporated like a Cheshire cat.
the cmpleion f th newwome s-Bill Livant}
Swimming Pool, (2) murmurings -*-n
in favor of a new Student Ac-
tivities Building. and (3) "sig- 1 Trcle Tont's Calbin7...
nals" by the Board in Control
of Intercollgiate Athletics (what To the Editor:
a mouthful!) that it intends to /ED., APRIL 21, S. L. abolished
replace Yost Fieldhouse, the In- the Human Relations commit-
tramural Sports Building, and the tee. All but four of the Iegislatur=
Athletic Administration Building ers apparently believed that this
in the "near future." committee (which dealt mainly
These events push to the fore- with problems of discrimination),
front the question of which build- did not deserve a place in S. L.
ings come first. In this univer- 1 str'ucture. As if, to show the
sity-indeed, in any first-rate uni- stupidity of S. L.'s actions, on
versity with a library system like Thurs., April 24th, Delta Kappa
ours-we would argue that library Epsilon hurled an insult into the
construction needs should be met face of the Negro people. By enter-
before any of these other building rio Cebln Bnter-
projctsmenione abveing Uncle Tom's Cabin in the par-
projects mentioned above. ade they reengraved the picture of
The case rests on (1) the rela- the Negro sterotype into the mindsl
sive importance of various activi- of the spectators. No doubt many
ties in the university and (2) the people will fail to understand why
sorrystate of our existing library we object to having the Negro!
Aysem mphsterotype excavated as they fail-
A comprehensie statement of ed to understand our objections to
university purposes would certain- the East uae in t Kl

REGULAR SCHEDULE

MONDAY

(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at

8
9
10
11
1
2
3
8
9
10

Tuesday, June 1
Saturday, May 29
Monday, May 31
Wednesday, June 2
Friday, June 4
Thursday, June 3
Saturday, June 5
Wednesday, June 2
Saturday, May 29
Thursday, June 3
Friday, June 4
Tuesday, June 1
Monday, May 31
Saturday, June 5

I

ly include extra-curricular, physi- 3Litazb 'U':" y'U"'ru
cal education, and perhaps even Klux Klan last spring while a
"entertainment" objectives. But Negro Fraternity was serenadg.e
it would give a higher rank, we No doubt they will say as they
believe, to the intellectual train- did then "it was only harmless C
ing of students, the control of re-fuositewa" oneywit no
search, and general administration cious intent" or "they didn't know
of knowledge. you would take it that way". They
An adequate library system is in- might have had fun, they might
disensbletothe attainment of have had good intentions, andj
dispensible to tmaybe they didn't consider the
these objectives. reactions of the Negro. Neverthe-
One doesn't need to work very1estina theydr d eurthn-
hard to make a strong case for j less, I maintain they did hurt and
moret aque lisrryn fcilitie insult the Negro people. I believe
more adequate library facilities. the fact that twice within a one
-The deficiencies of our existing tefc httiewti n
system are well-known: (x1the year period some have failed toj
dispersion of its collection of books have fun without hurting another I
to numerous sub-libraries scatter- racial group, or they have mis-
ed all over the campus (One must directed their good intentions or
do tn they failed to predict the reactions
visit 3 different libraries to obta ts
majo ecoomic jounals f. of the Negro; points to a need for
major economics journals, for
example.) (2) storage of some a Human Relations committee in
the S. L. structure.
items in almost completely in- -Willie B. Hackett
accessible locations (the library
attic); (3) the apparent need
to deny undergraduates access to
library "stacks".
It is against this background of
deficiencies that we suggest that
Library needs should come first
--extra-curricular, physical edu-
cation and entertainment needs
second even if a new library does-
n't ":pay".n
-Blanche and Scott Maynes
*u *&*I

sI

TUESDAY
Economics 51,5
English 1, 2
Sociology 51, 54
Chemistry 4, 8
Spanish 1, 2, 31
Russian 2
Political Scienc
Psychology 31
Botany 1, 2, 12
French 1, 2, 11,
German 1, 2, 1
Economics 53,5
E.E. 5
M.I.E. 135
P.E. 11, 12, 31,
C.E. 2
C.E. 21, 22
Chemistry 4
C.E. 151
E.M. 1, 2
Draw. 1 and Dr
English 11
Draw. 2, Group
Draw. 3

SPECIAL PERIODS
Literature, Science and the Arts
52, 53, 54 Monday, May 31
Tuesday, June 1
4, 60, 90 Tuesday, June 1.
, 23 Saturday, June 5
1, 32 Monday, June 7
Monday, June 7
e 2 Monday, June 7
Tuesday, June 8
22 Tuesday, June 8
12, 31, 32, 61, 62 Wednesday, June 9
1, 31, 32 Wednesday, June 9
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
54 Monday, May 31
Tuesday, June 1
Wednesday, June 2
32, 131 Thursday, June 3
Friday, June 4
Saturday, June 5
Saturday, June 5
Moncay, June 7
Monday, June 7
aw. 2, Group A Monday, June 7
Tuesday, June 8
B Tuesday, June 8
Wednesday, June 9

(at 11
(at 1
(at 2
(at 3

9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-0
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
9-12
9-12
2-5
9-12
2-5
9-12
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
9-12
2-5
9-12
2-5
9-12
9-12
2-5
9-12
2-5
9-12

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS
LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
No date of Examination may be changed without the con-
sent of the Committee on Examination Schedules.
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
No date of examination may be changed without the con-
sent of the Classification Committee. All cases of conflicts be-
tween assigned examination periods must be reported for ad-
justment. See bulletin board outside Room 301 West Engineer-
ing Building between May 3 and May 15 for instruction.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Individual examinations will be given for all applied musie
courses (individual instruction) elected for credit in any unit
of the University. For time and place of examinations, see bulle-
tin board in the School of Music.
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES /
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Courses not covered by this schedule, as well as any neces-
sary changes, will be indicated on the School bulletin board.

The Real Poison . . .
To the Editor:
MANY LETTERS to The Daily
discuss from one angle orl
another, the "threat" to "our in-
stitutions" and "our way of life,"
Somehow the actual condition of
our institutions gets lost in the
shuffle, yet the first step to seeingI

Sixty-Fourth Year
Edited and managed by students of
the University of Michigan under the
authority of the Board in Control of
Student Publications.

4

a threat is to see the damage going Editorial Staff
on. Harry Lunn.........Managing Editor
Perhaps we can begin with some- Eric vetter.................City Editor
thing more modest than "our way Virginia voss.........Editorial Director
ofliheing kremodrschanools.ur Mike Wolff........Associate City Editor
of life", like our schools. Our Alice B. Silver..Assoc. Editorial Director
schools are 72,000 teachers short ' Diane D. AuWerter.... Associate Editor
right now, and 60,000 leave the Helene Simon..........Associate Editor
profession each year. The re- Ivan Kaye ................. Sports Editor
Paul Greenberg.... Assoc. Sports Editorf
placement rate' is insufficient even C Marilyn Campbell...... Women's Editor
to hold our own. No social order Kathy Zeisler....Assoc. Women's Editor
has yet devised a school system Chuck Kelsey ......Chief Photographer
without teachers, and we are no
exception. No teachers, no schools. Business Staff'
If we want schools, this is of Thomas Treeger......Business Managerf
some importance since you cannot William Kaufman Advertising Manager
have a "way of life" without any i Harlean Hankin....Assoc. Business Mgr.
life at all. Here is a threat, and 'willam Seiden......Finance Manager
a major one Anita Sigesmund..Circulation Manager
S one.

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

of the Club will be admitted free upon
presentation of their membership cards.
La p'tite causette will meet tomor-
row from 3:30 to 5 p.m. in the Michigan
Union Cafeteria. French I or French
161-everyone is invited to this informal
coffee hour where only French is spok-
en.
The Congregational-Disciples Guild:
Tues., April 27, 7 a.m., breakfast medi-
tation-study group at Guild House
Chapel.
Assembly Dormitory Council meeting,
Mon., April 26, 4 p.m. in the League.
Michigan Crib, Prelegal Society.
Meeting, Tues., April 27, 8 p.m., Mich-
igan L . e nuesakAr Prof. Jnhn Daw-

I

f P!nr }iny nrl 4i+nm i7a o n "11

(Continued from Page 2)
Bennett's Mechanism and Torus. All
interested are invited to attend.
Political Science Round Table will
meet Tues., April 27, 7:45 p.m., Rack-
ham Amphitheater. Prof. Taylor Cole of
iuer TTniveriI w ,ill lar+r n +thI

Where does it come from? Is
the nation too poor to pay its

Telephone NO 23-24-1

;I

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