100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 13, 1954 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-02-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE FOUR

TIDE MICIGAN HAILY

. ..

'THE FIGHTING QUAKER'
Pearson Piles Up Law Suits, Laurels

IHC Christmas Project

WISE GUYS:
Tongue-in-Cheek Students,
Have Fun at Registration

BY BEA NEUFELD
Drew Pearson has been called
everything from a "chronic liar"
to "the most influential newspaper
man in the United States."
His daily column appears in 650
papers in each of the 48 states,
Japan, Latin America, India, the
Philippines, Hawaii, Guam and
England.
S * *
SO HE'S influential.
And the daring commentator
Is always involved in libel suits,
Baxter Suit
Challenged
In House Move
(Continued from Page 1)
ERNEST GOODMAN, defense
counsel for three of the six Com-
munists% on trial for conspiracy,
wound up his final argument yes-
terday and Federal Judge Frank
A. Picard pointed out he would
charge the jury Monday.
Rumors floating around cam-
pus hold that four to six faculty
members here have received
subpoenas from the House group,
but no reports as yet have been
confirmed by the University, or
by Rep. Clardy. No University
students have reported receipts
of subpoenas.
In January, Rep. Clardy was in-
vited to the campus by the Student
Legislature Academic Freedom
Sub-Commission to debate with
Prof. Preston Slosson of the his-
tory department the merits of the
activities of his committee.
QUESTION of the proposed de-
bate was "Have recent legislative
investigations into alleged sub-
version contributed to the wel-
fare of the United States?
The Representative refused
the invitation to speak on the
"pro" side of the controversy
since it would be improper for
"a member of a committee about
to hold hearings in Michigan to
engage in a discussion about
that hearing before it is held."
-He claimed "the very wording
of the subject indicates a bias or
lack of knowledge."
Clardy went on to say that if the
Academic Freedom Sub-Commis-
Sion does not "recognize the fact
that there is subversion, I am
afraid it would do no good to dis-
cuss any phase of the subject" with
the group.
But this week, SL voted to per-
mit the Sub-Commission to ask a
representative of Clardy to debate
the subject with Prof. Slosson
sometime after the hearings.
ISA To Hold
Party Tonight
TheeInternational StudentsnAs-
sociation and International Cen-
ter are sponsoring a reception for
foreign students and their Amer-
ican friends tonight at the Rack-
ham Hall Auditorium.
The program, which will begin
at 8 p.m., includes American Folk-
songs sung by the Glee Club,
square dancing led by the Lane
Hall dance group, and spirituals
done by the Dumbtrs.
ISA president Edward Planchon,
'54 today announced the new mem-
bers of the Executive Board. The
new vice president is R. K. Gupta,
graduate student in engineering.
John Iatrides, Grad., is the sec-
retary, with Patiphat Arayasastra,
Grad., serving as treasurer. Den-
nis Ribeiro, Grad. is retaining his
position as activities chairman.
Colbert, Gable Star

In SGuild Fm1111
"It Happened One Night" will
appear on the Student Legisla-
ture Cinema Guild screen at 7
and 9 p.m. today and 8 p.m. to-'
Inorrow in Architecture Auditor-
ium.
The film will star Claudette Col-
bert, Clark Gable and Walter Con-
Holey. Admission is 50 cents.

name - calling and physical
threats. President Franklin D.
Roosevelt at one time called him
a "chronic liar," and Senator
Joseph McCarthy has labeled
him a "political terrorist and
character assassin"' and a "voice
of international communism."
Nor is there any love lost by the
fiery Pearson over the Senator
from Wisconsin. Pearson filed a
$5,100,000 slander suit ih March,
1951charging that McCarthy phy-
sically assaulted him and entered
into a conspiracy with others to
drive him out of business.
He accuses McCarthy of being
'a headline seeker' and a danger
to our democracy. "People think
McCarthy is discovering Commu-
nist spies, but he isn't.
"The State Department con-
victed spies in the government'
three years before the Senator
made his first speech. And they
would continue without him," he
said.
IN FEBRUARY, 1946, long be-
Sponsors.
Petitions for Student Legis-
lature Cinema Guild sponsors
can be picked up at the SL
Bldg.
Any student organization
wishing to sponsor films on
weekends after March 7 must
turn in their petitions by Fri-
da_ Feb- 26_

fore McCarthy, Pearson, himself,
exposed a Canadian spy ring. "But
then I was criticized for being un-
fair to the Russians," he remark-
ed. "They were our friends then
and the information might upset
our relations with them."
Always in one kind of a law j
suit or another, Pearson set a
record for being in the biggest
case in the history of the United
.States. In 1938, Pearson and
Robert Allen wrote in their
"Washington Merry-Go-Round"
column that Rep. Martin Sween-
ey of Ohio had opposed the ap-
pointment of Emerich Freed as
a federal district judge in Cleve-
land because Freed was a Jew.
Sweeney filed libel suits against
every paper in each of the 48 states
which carried the column. After
Sweeney lost in 20 states and the
case was brought up before the Su-
preme Court, he dropped the rest
of the charges.
BECAUSE of his dynamic radio
programs and columns, Pearson,
who is a Quaker, was called by
ex-President Herbert Hoover, "the
Fighting Quaker." This is a grave
insult to one of that faith, for the
Quakers are a peaceloving people
who are adverse to fights of any
kind.
Pearson retaliated by paying
Hoover, who is also a Quaker,
the compliment of calling him
"the Quaking Fighter."

Ever had the urge to poke a
little fun at registration railroad;
tickets?
University employees who sort-
ed the repetitious blanks recently'
found that you're not alone if you
have.
, * * 1
FOR INSTANCE, they discover-
ed among the campus population1
sons of camel drivers, daughters1
of seamstresses for casket compan-
ies, and offspring of sword-swal-
lowers.
Married students, apparently'
bored with reality, replied vehe-
mently that their husbands and
wives are "full time spouses."
One woman didn't name any
guardian, but put "don't I wish"
in the space for "spouse."

Church preference blanks, too,
proved vulnerable targets for ton-
gue-in-cheek students. Their re-
sponses show that as well as more
conventional religions there are ad-
vocates here of tree worship, capi-
talism, anti-Nazism and Scrabble.
Of much interest to railroad-
ticket filers was the information
that many students were born in
1954.

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 1954
Still time
to take her
o*
-
It costs no more to give
the very best - Russell
Stover candy . . .
$1.25 pound
excluisive at
SCheo i' P 'i'ept4 i
G IFTS
1 312 South State Street
P c (-=--

FFRUIT' - FLAVORED LIPSTICK.
S ILKMAID'S fresh, bright exciting
colors., PYXIE PINK (the teen-
agers own true love),(CHERRY
PINK (lively rosy pink), RED
CURRANT (never changes color
under changing lights). Contain-
ing 15% sweet cream for satin-
smoothness. Exclusive at The
Fischer Pharmacy - Liberty at
Fifth Ave.

-Daily-Dean Morton
COTS FOR TOTS - Children in the Perry Nursery School are
shown with cots donated by the Inter-House Council. Eleven alum-
inum and canvas cots were contributed by the men's residence
halls as their Christias charity project. Set up to care for the
children of working mothers, the Perry Nursery School is a non-
profit organization that is partially supported by the Community
Chest.
CRIME DISPLAY, TOO:
Museums Offer Wide
Variety of Exhibitions

I.

~--~

DAY and NIGHT
CLASSES FORMING.
Uses ABCs'.
TYPING OPTIONAL.R
Over 400 Schools in U. S. will assist you in review or placement.
ENROLL TODAY IN FEBRUARY CLASS.
HAMILTON BUSINESS COLLEGE
Founded 1915 Phone NO 8-7831 State and Williams Sts.

ay, rer.
osOpponents have tried to get him
No set number of weekends of h i ae.Mcrh c
will be calendared, according to off the air waves. McCarthy ac-
Dave Gross, '56, chairman of cused all people who bought Adams
the Cinema Guild Board. The Hats-then Pearson's sponsors-of
boar, sid Goss wil asign aiding subversion.
spoardsa oroass wnil aspsig In January, 1951, Adams Hats,
as there are worthy student or- because they were switching radio
ganizations to fill the schedule. to newspaper and magazine ad-
vertising, terminated their spon-
sorship with him.
miIn.February, 1953, Carter o-
television program "because of his
iltemm a 4idsponsor's increased use of televi-
sion at this time."
As a result of a poll taken of
0 ere SAnewsmen in 1943, the columnist,
commentator, analyst and critic
(Continued from Page 1) was named "The Most Influential
Newspaperman in the United
The other two members thought States."
SAC student members should re- To Pearson, who competes
tain the nominative power because against the press and the official-
they were better able to appointj dom of Washington, who try to
qualified student representatives. prevent him from getting his ideas,
However, it seemed probable this is one of his most coveted
that members of the majority po- awards.
sition would press to have the next-
round of nominations made origi- Grade Report
nally by SL.r

By BOB KANY
Ancient and far-off countries
coupled with a history of American
crime are among the great variety
of exhibits being shown in the Uni-
versity's museums and libraries.
The Museum of Art in AlumniI
Hall is offering African sculpture.I
The many different types of sym-
bols used in ceremonies when
young men advance from the ado-
lescent stage to adulthood are
prominent in the display.
STUDENTS OF Architecture
and Design have set up a display
of black and white prints, most of
which are modern.
The Museum of Archaeology
has converted its rooms into a
Roman town in Egypt. Various
occupations are depicted and
childrens' toys, a typical Roman
courtyard, household equipment,
marriage rites and an EgyptianI
'Book of the Dead' written on
papyrus are shown.
In the cases of the Clements
Library is a study of American
crime, ranging from dualing to
forgery.
Among the many books, pam-
phlets and manuscripts are-stories
of murder, smuggling and the

Arnold used to sell out his coun-
try to the British when he offered
them West Point.
Piracy, slavery mob murder, tor-
ture and stories of horse thieves
as well as a forgery of George
Washington's name are also on
display.
At the University Museum a ro-
tunda exhibit of Tibetian Art with
its many superstitious meanings
is being shown including banners
from temples representing saints,
Gods and dieties of the Tibetan
people.
Rosarys, ceremonial knives, jew-
elry of turquoise and silver and
brass dishes used in the home are
among the many displays.

i,

READ
AND
USE
DAILY
CLASSI FIEDS

11

YESTERDAY'S meeting was ar-
ranged by Council Director Alan
W. MacCarthy and was led by the
Chairman of the Council's Board,
of Directors Earl H. Cress.
Originally, the five-member
majority had planned to sub-
mit its recommendation to the
April meeting of the Council's
Board but it is probable that the
plan will not be submitted if the
same objective can be achieved
without formal amendment of
the Council's charter.
The SAC student members will
attend the April Board meeting to
become more familiar with the
Council's activities.
Yesterday's meeting also pro-
duced suggestions that an oppor-
tunity be given to interested stu-
dents to petition for the Board
positions, and that a panel of
names be submitted to President
Hatcher for final choice. Under
procedure used last fall, only two
names to fill as many positions
were sent to the President.
illiais Speaks
At Lincoln Dinner
Addressing members of the
Washtenaw County Republican,
Committee at their Lincoln Day
dinner last night, Undersecre-
tary of Commerce Walter Wil-
liams appealed to party workers to
help increase the ranks of the
GOP. '
In the coming elections Wil-
liams said, "With an army of will-
ing workers, well organized and
well financed, possessed of an in-
spiring understanding of the value
of that for which they strive, there
is no question as to the final out-
come-a strong supporting Con-
gress for President Eisenhower."

Speedup Set
From now on transi~ints of

grades will be sent to students ro
once a school year, instead of twice,
according to Assistant Registrar
Edward Grosbeck.
The new system which was in-
stituted this semester is designed,
to enable the student to get his
grades more quickly than in the
past.

riginal letter in code Benedict

II

Come to the
PAUL UNYAN-
DANCE
PAUL McDONOUGH 0 UNION * SAT. FEB. 27, 8-12
TICKETS $2.25

Grosbeck explained that send-
ing out transcripts at the end
of the fall semester often meant
students did not get them be-
fore registration because trans-
cripts are sent to the home ad-
dress.
Handing out the grades at regis-
tration willuaid the student in
planning his courses, Grosbeck,
added.
Full transcripts will be sent to
students at the end of the spring
semester and at the end of the
summer session.
SNACK
DELIVERY
SERVICE
to Women's Residences
on Observatory Hill.
Delivery on the Hour
8 - 9 -10 Every Evening.
Place orders 15 minutes
before the hour.
SPECIAL TODAY:
BROWN I ES
SNACK SERVICE
Phone NO 8-6076

ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Sts.
Masses Daily at 7:00 A.M., 8:00 A.M., 9:00 A.M.
Sunday at 8-9:30 A.M., 11-12.
Novena Devotions, Wednesday Evenings 7:30 P.M.
Newman Club Rooms in Father Richard Center.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed Churches
of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director
Res. Ph. NO 5-4205. Office Ph. NO 8-7421
10:00 A.M.: Morning Service.
7:30 P.M.: Evening Service.
THEOSOPHICAL SOCIETY in Ann Arbor
presents Series of Introductory Talks on Theosophy
every Wednesday at 8 P.M.
Place: 736 So. State St., Telephone NO 2-6295
Topic for next Wednesday, Feb. 17th:
"God: Who and What is God? Why and How
does He make and continue to make the
Universe?, etc.
Public is cordiallyinvited.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
120 South State Street
Merrill R. Abbey, Erland J. Wangdaht;
Eugene A. Ransom, Ministers
9:00 and 10:45 A.M.: Worship: "When Jesus
Borrows. from You," Mr. Abbey preaching.
10:15 A.M.: Student Seminar.
5:30 P.M.: Fellowship Supper,
6:45 P.M.: Program, Merrill R. Abbey speaks on
the topic "Self Affirmation."
Welcome to Wesley Foundation Rooms, open daily.
THE FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw, Phone NO-20085
Edward H. Redman, Minister
10:00 A.M.: Adult Discussion Group.
11:00 A.M.: Pledge of brotherhood sermon -
"Ethics."
7:30 P.M.: Unitarian Student Group. Free trans-
portation from Lane Hall.
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
State and Huron Streets, Phone NO-2-1121
Wm. C. Bennett, Pastor
10:00 A.M.: Sunday School. Classes for all ages.
11:00 A.M.: "A Pathway To Heaven."
6:30 P.M.: Youth Groups.
7:30 P.M.: "Jesus In The Midst."
Wed. 7:30: Prayer Meeting.
A warm welcome awaits you here. Come and
hear the Word of God.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL AND
REFORMED.
423 South Fourth Ave.
Walter S. Press, Pastor
William H. Bos, Minister to Students
Irene Applin Boice, Director of Music
10:45 A.M.: Worshio Service. "Bought with a
Price" by Rev. Thomas K. Thompson.
7:00 P.M.; Student Guild at Bethlehem Church.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
AND STUDENT CENTER
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Henry Kuizenga, Minister
Charles Mitchell, Assistant Minister
William S. Baker, Student Pastor
Donna B. Lokker, Program Assistant
9:15 and 11:00 A.M.: Morning Worship. Dr.
Kuizenga preaching on "Radar and the Gyro-
scope.
6:45 P.M.: Supper Club. Speaker, Rev. Liber.

LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill and Forest Avenue
Dr. H. O. Yoder, Pastor
Sunday-9:00 A.M.: Matins Service.
10:00 A.M.: Bible Study.
11:00 A.M.: Worship Service.
7:00 P.M.: Dr. Conrad Bergendoff, Pres. of
Augustana College, Rock Island, Ill., Speaker,
"The Lutheran Church and Christian Higher
Education."
ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
306 North Division St.
Rev. Henry Lewis, Rector
Dr. Robert H. Whitaker, Chaplain for
Student Foundation
Mrs. Elizabeth M. Davis, Social Director
8:00 A.M.: Holy Communion,
9:00 A.M.: Holy Holy Communion and Com-
mentary. (Student Breakfasts follow both of
these services at Canterbury House.)
11:00 A.M.: Church School.
11:00 A.M.: Morning Prayer and Sermon.
4:30 P.M.: Student Confirmation Class, Canter-
bury House.
6:00 P.M.: Youth Group.
6/00 P.M.: University Student Supper Club.
1:00 P.M.: Adult Confirmation Class, Parish
House Lounge.
8:00 P.M.: Evening Prayer and Commentary.
During the Week: Wednesday and Thursday, Holy
Communion 7:00 A.M., followed by student
breakfast; Friday, Holy Communion 12:10 P.M.
Tuesday and Fridby, Tea at Canterbury House,,
4:00-5:15; Thursday, 12:15 P.M. Faculty Lun-
cheon Seminar, Canterbury House; Friday,
Canterbury Club, 7:30 P.M.
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. George Borger, Minister
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship. Sermon: "When
You Pray."
Nursery for childre nduring service.
9:45 A.M.: Church School.
Meeting at Congregational Church; 7:00 P.M.
Speaker: Dr. Frank Huntley: "One Aspect of
Comparative Religions."
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
Alfred T. Scheips. Pastor
Sunday at 9:30 and at 10:45: Two Worship
Opportunities, with the pastor preaching on
the topic, "Lives Worthy of Christ's Gospel."
Sunday at 6:00: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
Club, Supper and Program. The Rev. Armand
Ulbrich, Ph.D., of Detroit, Speaker on "Religion
in the Modern American Novel."
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East Huron, Phone 7332
Rev. C. H. Loucks, Pastor and Student Coun-
selor
9:45 A.M.: The Student Class continues its dis-
cussion series with "What Students Can Be-
lieve About the Second Coming."
11:00 A.M.: The Morning Worship Service.
"Resilience" - Rev. Loucks.
6:00 P.M.: Guild Cabinet meeting in' the Guild
House.
6:45 P.M.: Roger Williams Guild. Dr. Herman
Jacob, Director of Hillel Foundation, speaks on
"Contemporary Judiasm."

I1

DRIVE RIGHT IN!

4ea

No parking problem

Quick service
Large selection

t

I

I sr

ICE CUBES
KEG BEER
11 4 East William

Open 10to 10
Sunday 12 to 7

Phone NO 3-7191

I

I

I

I

GUADALAJARA
SUMMER SCHOOL
y .: 2XJ The accredited bilingual summer
,} ~school sponsored by the Universidad
Autonoma de Guadalajara and mem-
bers of the Stanford University fac-
ulty will be offered in Guadalajara,
Mexico, June 27 - August 7, 1954.
Offerings include art, creative writ-
ing, folklore, geography, history,
language and literature courses.
$225,covers six-weeks tuition, board
Box room, Write Prof. Juan B. Rael,
ao K, Stanford University, Calif.

Are you getting your money's worth?
Are you g'etting
FOOD YOU LIKE?
FREE SNACKS

FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETING
Lane Hall
11 :00 A.M.: Sundays. Visitors welcome.

THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 West Stadium
(Formerly at Y.M.C.A.)
Sundays: 10:15, 11:00 A.M., 7:30 P.M.
Wednesdays: 7:30 P.M., Bible Study.

11

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan