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April 16, 1954 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-04-16

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-1

PAGE Sim

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, APRIL 16,;1954

A oft-

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REDUCED PRICE!

Student Group To Sponsor
Sojourns in Foreign Lands

SL Honors
Outstanding
Fni~io It v v

CRIME PREVENTION:
New Quarters, Head Advance Plans
For Police Department Youth Bureau

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COMPLETE LINE of Argus Cameras at new
Reduced Prices because of Excise tax reductions.
CPUR CHASE C R A AMERA SHOP
1116 South University
PURCHASE FROM "PURCHASE"

By DEBRA DURCHSLAG
From Scotland to India, appli-
cations are still open for Ameri-
can students to live with families
in foreign countries, speaking the
language of the country and be-
coming acquainted with its peo-
ple.
The Experiment in Internation-
al Living, a non-profit student
travel organization, will make it
possible for 450 students to travel
and live abroad. Established in
1932, the Experiment sets up tra-
vel groups of ten under qualified
leaders and places each individual
with a family which has children
of his age.
ONE MONTH of the summer is
spent in a community,.sharing ev-
eryday life with the family and
viisting nearby points of interest.
The second month is for travel.
Under the leader's direction, the
group, takes a camping trip, each
student bringing along one young
member of his foreign family.
The very end of the summer
may be reserved for indepen-
dent excursions or journeys to
capital cities such as London
or Paris. Aimed at giving the
student concentrated knowledge
of only one country, the Experi-
ment program is set up to ac-
Riesman To Talk
At Phi Bete Dinner
Prof. David Riesman will be the
featured lecturer at this year's
annual initiation banquet of Phi
Beta Kappa April 22.
Professor of Social Science at
the University of Chicago, Ries-
man will speak on "Freud and
the Good Life." He is the author
of, "The Lonely Crowd" and
"Faces in the Crowd." In all his
works, he has been concerned with
the problem of conformity.

commodate travel in mainly one ? a U L Iy 1 V1. U/i
foreign region.
Applications for Experiment A list of six professors, one of
nembership from college women whom will receive the newly cre-
are still being accepted for Aus- ated award as the "Outstanding
tria, Denmark, Finland, France, Faculty Member of the Year" has
Germany, Holland, Ireland, Italy, been approved by a special Stu-
Scotland and Yugoslavia. Open-, dent Legislature committee.
ngs for college men are available The six, who were chosen from
in all countries except Norway. a list of nine drawn up by the
Senior Board include Prof Ger-

COSTS FOR a summer in Eur-
ope under the Experiment vary
from $695 to $775. Mexican trips
average $390, with the highest fee
set at $1245 for the group leaving
for India in October. The Experi-
menters will leave on five differ-
ent sailings between June 19 and
29 aboard Holland-America line
ships and student travel ships.
- Deadline for Experiment ap-
plications is June 1, but stu-
dents are urged to apply as soon
as possible because groups are
being rapidly filled. Those in-
terested may write to the ad-
missions committee of the Ex-
periment in International Liv-
ing at Putney, Vermont.
A minimum language require-
ment of two year's study is re-
quired for foreign language coun-
ries. Since the Experimenter will
be living alone with the family,
reasonable conversational fluency
is necessary. Academic standing
in the top half of the class and
genuine interest in working for
international understanding are
other qualifications.
The University of Michigan is
one of several schools that have
given language credit for parti-
cipation in a foreign-language
speaking group. Colgate Univer-
sity tests indicate that in terms
of language comprehension, an
Experiment experience equals two
semesters of language study.
Order of Coif
To Initiate 23
Law Students
Following in the bewigged and
long-robed tradition of their Eng-
lish predecessors, twenty-three
top-ranking senior Law students
have been appointed to the Order
of the Coif, the Law School an-
nounced yesterday.
In the top ten per cent of the
August, February and June grad-
uates, the members include David
W. Belin, George B. Berridge, Rob-
ert H. Bloom, Paul B. Campbell,
Howard A. Cole and Donald V.
Droste.
. * *.
OTHER members are John Ga-
lien, Jr., John C. Hall, Alan R.
Hunt, Donn B. Miller, Gene E.
Overbeck, Chester F. Relyea, Wal-
ter J. Roper, Harold A. Rueme-
napp, Theodore J. St. Antoine,
Samuel I. Shuman and Raymond
R. Trombadore.
Concluding the list are James
D. Voss, Walter H. Weiner, Don-
ald M. Wilkinson, Arthur M.
Wisehart, Marvin O. Young and
Richard W. Young.
The English Order of the Coif,
ancestor of the American Order,
was the most ancient and respect-
ed institution of the common law
and is the highest honor attainable
in American law schools.
The Order takes its unusual
name from the white silk hood
thateall members were required to
wear as seen in old engravings of
distinguished judges.

r

ald O.,Dykstra, of the business ad-
ministratio nschool, Prof. Marvin
J. Eisenberg of the Fine Arts de-
partment, Prof. George G. Cam-
eron, chairman of the Near East
studies department, and Profes-
sors Maynard Klein and Philip A.
Duey of the music school.
* * *
THE WINNING professor, who
will be chosen on the criteria of
outstanding teaching ability com-
bined with an active interest in
students outside of the classroom,
will be presened with a scroll and
invited to be guest of honor at the
Legislature's Spring Banquet. The
other five will receive honorable
mention.
Officers Chosen
James W. Richards, '55Ph, was
elected president of the School of
Pharmacy, class of '55, Wednes-
day.
Also chosen at the elections were
Roand C. Zagnoli, 55Ph, vice-

By PAT ROELOFS
Aiming at crime prevention and
better conditions for Ann Arbor's
youth, the Youth Bureau of the
Police Department is fast getting
past the planning stage.
Two big steps have been taken
in the past few weeks that are
encouraging to 'active combatants
of juvenile delinquency. Last
week the City Council approved
the appointment of George Sim-
mons as head of the newly creat-
ed Youth Bureau.
Previously the detectives moved
away from their first floor rooms
connected to police offices to re.-
decorated -tjuarters in the base-
ment of City Hall.
*" *
SGT. SIMMONS described the
effect of the change in quarters
as "very positive" and declared
that separation of rooms in which
juveniles will be questioned from
police offices will reduce the fear
teenagers already may have of
men in uniform.
Discussing the advantage of
a specific bureau to handle juve-
nile cases, Sgt. Simmons said
that "we will be better able to
get a true picture of the nature
of each case this way." Former-
ly, seven detectives each handled
cases in a different way.
all apprehended youngsters, bet-
ter coordination will result.
He is already in the process of

SGT. GEORGE SIMMONS'M
... Youth Bureau head
learning the functions of the sev-
eral social agencies that deal with
juvenile problems. He will in the
future contact families of delin-
quents, courts and welfare organi-
i. ______

A;

zations and work with them in
improving as much as possible the
conditions in each case.
THE NEED for a Washtena.w
county detention home was stress-
ed by the new Youth Bureau Di-
rector. He described a recent case
he studied where a boy was arrest-
ed for car theft and running
away from home. "Because we
don't have a detention home, we
had to refer the boy to his owl
home, which solved nothing since
that's where his trouble began."
However, the former detec-
tive is not in favor of having the
detention rooms in the same
building as the county jail as
was suggested earlier this week
to the Board of Supervisors.
Full scale operations in the
Youth Bureau branch of the Polite
Department will begin after July
1 when the budget for the new
fiscal year is approved according
to Sgt. Simmons.

{'

president; Herbert
'55Ph, secretary and

D. Zarrow,
Joan Rosen-

berg. '55Ph, treasurer.

Greek and Elizabethan Drama
Discussed at Classics Lecture

9.

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r

"The ground plan of a Greek
temple is as simple as that of a
kitchen table whereas that' of a
Gothic temple is dynamic by its
very nature."
Using this analogy Prof. H. D.
F. Kitto drew comparisons and
contrasts of "the Form of Greek
and Elizabethan Drama," in his
lecture yesterday in the Rack-
ham Amphitheater, under the
sponsorship of the Department of
Classical Studies.
Continuing the analogy, the
professor from the University of
Bristol in England explained that
just as to a Gothic temple build-
ings may be easily subtracted so
may scenes be cut from a Shake-

speare play without changing the
meaning. However, if lines were
taken out of a Greek drama the
play would be as altered as a
Greek temple if a fragment of it
were changed.
Prof. Kitto used as examples
"Agamemnon" and Sophocles'
"Antigone," showing these dram-
atists' use of only three actots
in contrast to Shakespeare's
"Henry V" in which he used a
multitude.

11

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You walk on a cloud when you walk on
Billowy Crepe soles by Winthrop.
Step cushion-soft. Wear like iron.
Look smart and trim. Wherever
feet can take you, they'll take
you better on Billowy
Crepe. We have a wide ?

Ieider To Discuss
Forms of Conflict
"The Forms of Conflict" will
be discussed by Fritz Heider, Pro-
fessor of psychology at the Uni-
versity of Kansas, at 4:15 p.m. to-
day in Aud. C, Angell Hall.
The psychology colloquium is
being sponsored by the psychology
department.

Fordhom University
School of Law
NEW YORK
Three-Year Day Course
Four-Year Evening Course
CO-EDUCATIONAL
Member Assn. of American Law
Schools. Matriculants must be
College graduates and present
full transcript of College record.
Classes Begin Sept. 27, 1954
For Further Information Address
Registrar Fordham University
School of Law
302 Broadway, New York 7, N.Y.

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