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March 31, 1954 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-03-31

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THE MICH IGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY. MARCH 31, 1954

Langer Enjoys Poetry, Quartets, Art

NOT EVERYBODY HAS PINUPS:
WVT 11 A YUTI

By PAT RO~LIOFS
Five miles from Ann Arbor in a
setting of woods and pasture, there
is a two-room log cabin.
Resident of the isolated house
is visiting philosophy lecturer,
Prof. Susanne K. Langer.
THE EMINENT philosopher-
writer chose the uninhabited area
for her temporary home, because,
as she puts it, "being free from
radios, telephones and doorbells is
the only way to get difficult and
sustained work done." ;
She mused .that the famed
British philosopher Bertrand
Russell also found solitude nec-
essary for productive hours.
"Remember he once said he ac-
complished the most work during
the year he spent in jail as a
pacifist" she observed.
The work she has been engaged
in for the past six years in addi-
tion to teaching philosophy
courses, has been the writing of
the book "Feeling and Form." The
book deals with what is created
in art and is a sequel to her pre-
vious publication "Philosophy in
a New Key."
The latter book, published in
1942, his to date sold more than
250,000 copies and has been used
as a reference work in courses from
anthropology, a'rt, music and lit-
erature to philosophy.
"FEELING and Form" was pub-
lished last year. The main topics
of the book are what is created in
art, how it is created, and why,
- Prof. Langer said.
Three lectures under the aus-
pices of the philosophy depart-
ment will be delivered by Prof.
Langer on April 13, 15 and 22.
The talks will treat of the same
subjects as her latest book,
though going somewhat beyond
it, she declared.
Two weeks ago, Prof. Langer
gave a series of talks at Wesleyan
University on these topics. The
purpose of the lectures sponsored
there by the Matchette Founda-

Wails Are

wnat

You Make

PROF. SUSANNE K. LANGER, AUTHOR OF "FEELING AND FORM"I

Them
Contriry to popular opinion,
pin-ups are not the only room
decorations found in the men's
dorms.
Althoug h a great number of
wall-coverings are pin-ups, there
are enough imaginative residents
in the quads to provide some
variety.,
* **
THEl PICTURE alt 1the topa is
the room of a college photogra-
pher with some. of his better pic-
tures adorning the wall.
A hunting lodge atmosphere
vies for space in a Gomberg
house room with political per-
sonages and the. appropriate
commentaries.
Another South Quad resident is
watched over by a luminous skele-
ton that ,sways gently above the
furniture for most of the school
year.
EXAMPLES of different leaves
from the Ann Arbor area hang
over the bed of a Winchell House
botany enthusiast.
St. George's dragon is the
remnant of a house dance and
"E the assorted foods pictured in
the picture are helpful at night,
a "especially after quad food,"
commented the room's occupant.
An ever-growing picture collec-
tion is hung with an admittedly
non-aesthetic touch in another
West Quad room. All in the mod-
ern period, the reproductions
range from the sedate Grandma
Moses to the cubistic Picasso.
The final picture of lights,
plants and irrigation finds again
a nature lover, and included in
the jungle is an unusual mimosa
plant that closes its leaves upon
stimulation.
In summary, these pictures
have attempted to show that the
traditional belief that women's
rooms are more imaginative is
pure legend.

tion, was to "bring philosophy to
the academic community."
TRULY a lover of art, the gray-
hair'ed philosopher says she reads
"rafts of poetry." Reciting works
fluently from translations of the
ancient Chinese poets to Elizabeth
Barrett Browning and including
Shakespearean sonnets, Prof.
Langer -tells that she has made a
study of "expressiveness in art,"
"creation" and "living form" with
respect to literature just as in the
other arts.
In addition to much hard work
writing and preparing for her
lectures in Aesthetics and the
seminar she conducts on the
Impact of Science on Recent
Philosophy, the well known phi-
losopher finds time to join three
local young musicians as a cell-
ist for some sessions of string
quartet music,
"We play mostly classics," she
smiled," "but Hindemith has some
enjoyable little works that are not{
beyond us." She insists that she is
only a modest amateur, although
she journeys to Toledo every week
to play quartet music with friends
there.

Odegaard To Act
As Commentator
Dean Charles E. Odegaard of the
literary college will act as a com-
mentator Thursday afternoon at
a special conference at Western
Michigan College honoring the
school's 50th anniversary.
Also appearing at the confer-
ence will be Dr. Robert Fox, prin-
cipal of the University Elemen-
tary School, who will lead a dis-
cussion on "Laboratory Experi-
ences For Prospective Teachers."
Spaulding To oGive
Classical Recital
Mary .Spaulding, Grad, will pre-
sent a public recital of classical
piano music at 8:30 p.m. today in
Rackham Assembly Hall.
On her program will be Schu-
bert's "Four Impromptus," Cho-
pin's "Ballade, Op. 23," Beetho-
ven's "Sonata, Op. 110" and Hon-
egger's "Toccata and Variations."
JOIN THE RED CROSS

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THE COLLEGE YHOTOGRAPHER

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ONE THAT DIDN'T GET AWAY

BURNING THE MIDNIGHT OIL

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ADAILY
PHOTO
FEATURE
Pictures by
CHUCK KELSEY
Story by
HARRY STRAUSS

K -- a J 2 4 tP ,
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