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March 28, 1954 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1954-03-28

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILT

CTTN?1t1V 1N'A'RC' 'Cx + 1 4",t

THE MICHIGAN DAIT~

,,, i;1VllaY, A1r1K(;EI '.:Ss 9 4

F

HISPANIC FIESTA:
Indian Heads To Be Featured

By LEE MARKS
Two authentic shrunken Indian
heads will be featured at the arts
and crafts exhibit of the fourth
annual Hispanic Fiesta, to be held
here Tuesday and Wednesday.
About the size of oranges, the
heads originally came from the Ji-
varos, an Indian tribe in the high-
lands of Peru. Although no longer
practiced, head-hunting and
shrinking were .once common to
the Indians of the tribe, according
to Edward Worthen of the Span-
ish department.
* s s
THE SHRUNKEN heads which
were loaned to the Spanish depart-
ment for their fiesta by the Uni-
versity Museum of Anthropology
are very rare. The Peruvian gov-
ernment has cracked down on
head-hunting and both the Pern-
vian and American governments
forbid trafficking in shrunken
heads, therefore Worthen estimat-
ed "some people would pay more
than $1000 for one of these heads."
Worthen explained that the
Jivaros made a practice of exe-
cuting their captives and shrink-
ing the heads. The shrinking
was a delicate process and invol-
ved .'removing the bones and
first soaking the head in a boil-
ing solution.
"Then the heads were filled with
hot sand and slowly shrunk over
a small fire. The sand was remov-
ed as the head shrank in order to
closely preserve the features of the
face," Worthen said.
As a final measure, Worthen
noted that the lips of the head
were sewn together in order to pre-
vent any bad spirits from escap-
ing. The heads were then worn
on the warriors' belts.
* . *
BETWEEN SEVEN and eight
hundred high school students are
expected at the Fiesta, according
to Prof. Anthony Pasquariello of
the Spanish department. The fea-
ture attraction of the Fiesta, will
be "Sueno De Una Noche De Agos-
to," a romantic comedy.
Featuring Carolee Dickie, '55,
and Daniel Testa in the roman-
tic leads, "Suena De Una Moche
De Agosto" develops an amusing
situation on around "a young
Spanish lady who wants to have
the freedom and liberty that1
young men do," commented Prof.
Pasquariello, director of the play.
The Hispanic Fiesta has been
held annually for the past four
years in order to give students a
chance to see the work of the
Spanish department.9

--Daily-Chuck Kelsey
TWO SHRUNKEN HEADS-These authentic miniatures will be
on view at the arts and crafts exhibit of the Hispanic Fiesta.
Today's Writings Preparation
eerFuture Style,_RiceSay%-s

open to juniors and seniors in the
College of Literature, Science, and the
Arts of the University of Michigan.
Term papers dealing with relevant
topics may be entered in the contest.
Such papers should be submitted
through the instructor of the course
for which the paper was written. Other
entries should be submitted to the Sec-
retary of the Department of Sociology
(5602 Haven Hall). Papers may be sub-
mitted in competition any time up to
April 1, 1954. They will be judged by a
departmental committee by May 21,
1954.
All entries should be typewritten and
be between 2,500 and 8,000 words in
length. The papers must deal with
topics which fall within the following
categories:
1. The Analysis of a Social Group
2. The Analysis of a Sociological Hy-
pothesis
3. A Case Study of Social Change
4. The Analysis of a Social Institu-
tion
5. The Study of a Community or
Community Segment
6. The Analysis of a Social Process.
All veterans who expect to receive
education and training allowance un-
der Public Law 550 (Korea G.I. Bill)
must get instructors' signatures for
March and turn Dean's Monthly Certifi-
cation into Dean's office before 5 p.m.
on April 2.
Travel and Summer Projects Room is
now open at Lane Fall daily, 9 a.m.
to 10 p.m., under the auspices of the
SL International Committee and SRA
Social Action Committee. Information'
on schedules, costs, and opportunities
fortwork, study, and travel in all parts
of the world.
Mortgage Loans. The University is in-
terested in making first mortgage loans
as investments of its trust funds. The
Investment Office, 3015 Administra-
tion Building, will be glad to consult
with anyone considering building or
buying a home, or refinancing an exist-
ing mortgage or land contract. Appoint-
ments. may be made by calling Exten-
sion 2606.
Teaching positions at Bir Zeit Col-
lege, Jordan. Persons with master's de-
grees who are interested in teaching
either mathematics and physics or Eng-
lish at Bir Zeit College, Jordan, may
obtain additional information by con-
tacting the Bureau of Appointments,
3528 Administration Building, or call-
ing NO 3-1511, Ext. 2614.
Teaching Candidates: On Mon., Mar.
29, the following people will be on
campus to interview prospective teach-
ers:
Bloomfield Hills, Michigan-Teacher
needs as follows: Elementary, Jr. High
Science, Jr. High Social Science, Jr.
High Mathematics, Jr. High English,
Jr. High. Spanish, Jr. High Core.
Charlotte, Michigan-Teacher needs
as follows: Commercial; American Lit-
erature; Algebra; Jr. High Arithmetic;
Girl's Phys. Ed.; Jr. High English; Ele-
mentary Vocal Music, Early Elementary.
Teaching Candidates: On Tues., Mar.
30, the following people will be on
campus to interview prospective teach-
ers:
Berkley, Michigan-Teacher needs as
follows: Elementary only,
Lapeer, Michigan-Teacher needs as
follows: English and Social Studies (Jr.
High); Speech and English. %
If you would like to make appoint-
ments for any of the above, call Bureau
af Appointments, NO 3-1511, Ext. 489,
3528 Administration Bldg. Please try and
call at least a day in advance if you
want to be sure of an appointment.

a.m. to 5 p.m. from Monday, Mar. 29,
through Fri., April 2. The classes will
begin the week following spring vaca-
tion. April 2 is the last day for regis-
tration.
Seminar in Complex Variables will
'meet Mon., Mar. 29, at 4 p.m. in 3010
Angell Hall. Professor A. J. Lohwater
will speak on "Schwarz Reflection
Principle.'
Seminar in the History of Mathe-
matics. Mr. Norman Frisch will continue
his discussion of "The Beginnings of
Modern Mathematics" Mori, Mar. 29,
at 4 p.m., 3231 Angell Hall.
Aeronautical Engineering Seminar on
SHOCK WAVE INTERACTION by Pro-
fessor Otto Laporte, Physics Department,
Mon., Mar. 29, at 4 p.m., in 1504 East
Engineering Building.
Mathematics Colloquium, Tues., Mar.
30, 4:10 p.m., 3011 Angell Hall. Profes-
sor G. Lorentz of Wayne University will
speak on "Spaces of Integrable Func-
tions."
Doctoral Examination for Harold
Hendlowitz, Physics; thesis: "Theory of
an Electron in a Magnetic Fi9ld with
Applications to the Measurement of the
Gyromagnetic Ratio of the Free Elec-
tron," Mon., Mar. 29, 2038 Randall Lab-
oratory, at 1:30 p.m. Chairman, K. M.
Case,
Doctoral Examination for Robert Ir-
ving Davis, Geology; thesis: "The Ge-
ology and Ore Deposits of the Santa Ma-
ria del Oro Gold-Copper District, Du-
rango, Mexico," Tues., Mar. 30, 4065
Natural Science Bldg., at 3 p.m. Chair-
man, F. S. Turneaure.
Concerts
University Symphony Band, William
D. Revilli, Conductor, will present a
concert in Hill Auditorium at 4:15 Sun-
day afternoon, March 28, The program
will openwith an arrangement by Ger-
ald Bilik of Michigan songs, entitled
"M" Signiture. This will be followed
by Bach's Prelude and Fugue in D Mi-
nor, Cherubini's Overture to Anacreon,
and Barat's Andante et Scherzo, with
Wagner's Siegfried's Rhine Journey
from Gotterdammerung concluding the
first half. After intermission the band
will play Hindeminth'g Symphony in B
flat, and Varman's Cambodian Suite.
Three Sousa compositions will bring the
concert to a close: Nobles of the Mystic
Shrine; George Washington Bicenten-
nial, and Stars and Stripes Forever.
The general public will be admitted
without charge.
Student Recital. Frances Skaff, pian-
ist, will be heard at 8:30 Sunday even-
ing, March 28, in Auditorium A, Angell
Hall, in a program of compositions by
Bach, Schumann, Bartok and Beethov-
en. Miss Skaff is a pupil of John Kol-
len and plays the recital in partial ful-
fillment of the requirements for the
degree of Bachelor of Music. It will be
open to the general public.
Student Recital. Allen Norris, stu-
dent of piano with John Kollen, will
be heard at 8:30 Monday evening, Mar.
29, in Auditorium A, Angell Hall, in a
program of compositions by Bach, Scar-
latti, Barber, Schubert, and Chopin.
It is being played in partial fulfill-
ment of the requirements for the de-
gree of Bachelor of Music, and will be
open to the general public.
University Woodwind Quintet, Nelson
Hauenstein, flute, Albert Luconi, clari-
net, bare Wardrop, oboe, Ted Evans,
French horn, and Lewis Cooper, bas-
soon, will perform works by Rossini,
Rameau, Pierne, Bozza, Walker, and
Jongen, at 8:30 Tues. evening, Mar. 30,
in the Rackham Lecture Hall. The pro-
gram will be open to the general pub-
lic without charge.
(Continued on Page 4)

AICHIGAN DAILY
Phone NO 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .60 1.34 1.96
3 .70 1.78 2.94
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Figure 5 overage words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily,
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-BENRUS sky-chief wrist watch
without band. Lost between Packard
St. and Angell Hall. Reward, $10. Call
No 2-0796. )124A
FOR SALE
FOR SALE '53 Buick Special, 2-Door,
Loaded, By Owner. Call NO 2-6563
Between 5-6. )382B
SUBVERSIVES, LEFT-WINGERS, RAD-
ICALS, Do you long to be investigat-
ed? Be the first on campus to print
subversive material. I have a used
mimeograph machine to sell. Good
condition, $35.00, call NO 8-8258 .
Merritt Green. )383B
BUICK 4-door, blue. Radio andheater;
low mileage. See Smitty. Huron Mo-
tor Sales, 222 W. Washington,)NO
2-4588. )377B
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords-$6.88., Sox,
39c; shorts, 69c; military supplies.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington. )14B
A MEDIUM blue-grey gabardine suit.
Single breasted, sport style. Like new,
size 40 regular. Very reasonably pric-
ed. Call NO 3-1904 after 8 p.m. on
weekdays only. Ask for Steve. )299B
1948 CHEVROLET - Club coupe, one
owner. 22,000 miles. Cleanest '48 car
in the state! Huron Motor Sales, 222
W. Washington, NO 2-4588. )378B
BATTERIES $5 EXCHANGE
Guaranteed - Free Installation
BATTERY STORES ASSOCIATION
Liberty and Ashley - NO 3-5113
)329B
FOLDING BABY PEN with pad-Good
condition, $15. Gray folding baby
buggy, chrome handle with white
plastic, hardly used, $50. Originally
$89. Cosco baby high chair, all chrome
and steel with blue plastic seat cover,
adjustable foot rest, $16. Folding
Nursery Chair, $3. Majestic portable
radio with inside and outside aerial,
$48. Large Baby basinet with legs;
lining and pad; $8. Phone NO 2-9020.
)359B
1950 CHEVROLET--4-door, black. Radio,
heater, power-glide, low mileage.
Sharp! Huron Motor Sales, 222 W.
Washington, NO 2-4588. )379B
RE ELECT
N EMO
UNION VEEP
(Paid Political Adv.)

SALE
Spring House Cleaning Sale Saturday
and Monday only. Display and dis-
continued models, unclaimed repairs,
tripods, gadget bags, slide projectors,
cameras, etc. Purchase Camera Shop,
1116 S. University, NO 8-6972, )'368B
1949 FORD 6 with overdrive, radio, heat-
er. Good condit! Huron Motor Sales,
222 W. Washington, NO 2-4588. )380B
SPECIAL FOR TODAY! Choice of two
1949 Chevrolet 2 door. Clean, well
equipped. $625. University Motor
Sales. 907 N. Main. NO 3-0507. )373B
GUARANTEED SAFETY TESTED used
cars. University Motor Sales. 907 N.
Main. Ph. NO 3-0507. )374B
GAY CURTAINS, upper and lower
berths, make unique land cruiser out
of sleek, $350 Packard Hearse. Inex-
pensive way to tour. Excellent 1939
Packard with rebuilt motor. Call
Dave, NO 2-3777 between 6 and 9.
)375B
1951 CHEVROLET-4-door, grey. Radio
and heater, power-glide. A nice car!
Huron Motor Sales, 222 W. Washing-
ton, NO 2-4588. )381B
FOR SALE-TUXEDO, good condition,
$35. Call NO 8-9645. )376B
ROOMS FOR RENT
OVERNIGHT GUEST ROOMS
Rooms by Day or Week
Campus Tourist Homes. I h. NO 3-8454
518 E. Williams St. (near State)
)25D
CAMPUS ROOM for 1 or 2 men; kitchen
privileges. NO 3-0746 or NO 8-6876 )61D
FOR RENT
FOR RENT-Nice room, equipped for
light housekeeping with hot and cold
running water, electric plate, all utili-
ties. Refrigerator privileges. $8 for
single, $10 for double per week. Phone
NO 2-9020. )34C
HELP WANTED
WAITER SUBSTITUTE to work week-
end meals. NO 2-2333 after 7 p.m. )81H
PERSONAL
SEAFARERS TAKE NOTE! Coed cruises
on student run schooner leaving for
Carribean this summer. For details
contact Ken Ross; NO ,4882. )81F
PLEASE COME HOME, Barb; All is for-
given. I'll vote for JOHN BUCK as
L.S.&A. President. )88F
DARLING-When I get home I'll take
you out on the money I'm saving by
riding on the VULCAN SPECIAL --
Egbert. )87F
OF COURSE-WE'RE OPEN!
Student Periodical, NO 2-3061. )86F

WANT RIDE TO TEXAS for spring vaca-
tion-will help drive; Phil J. Sheridan,
School of Education, 2173 J, Ypsilanti.
)510
WANTED-Ride home to Ft. Lauder-
dale, Florida. Willing to share ex-
penses. Cali 329 Mosher. )54G
WANTED-Ride home to Ft. Lauderdale,
Florida. Willing to share expenses.
Call 201 Cooley E.Q. )550
RIDERS WANTED-Destination Florida
via Nashville and Atlanta. Leaving
April 2, 8 p.m. Returning April 11.
Call NO 3-2954 after 6 p.m. )560
BUSINESS SERVICES
APPLICATION PHOTOGRAPHS while
you wait at SNIDER STUDIOS, 213 So.
Main St. )161
TYPEWRITERS! Portable and Standard
for rent, sales, and service.
MORRILLS
PIANO SERVICE - Tuning, repairing
Work guaranteed. Call University Mu-
sic House, NO 8-7515. )271
RADIO SERVICE
Auto - Home - Portable
Phono and T.V.
Fast and Reasonable Service
ANN ARBOR RADIO AND T.
1214 So. Univ., Ph. NO 8-7942
1% blocks east of East Eng. ,)51
WASHING, Finished Work, and Hand
Ironing. Buff dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-up
and delivery. Ph. NO 2-9020. )21
TYPING-Prompt, accurate service on
term papers. NO 2-9214. )36I
TECHNICAL & BUSINESS RESEARCH
SERVICES-Bibliographies, photostats,
reprints, etc. Subject areas include
Engineering, Business Administration,
and Education. Work done by exper-
ienced company librarian. Joan Wiese,
214 Packard St. NO 8-8620. )371
ALTERATIONS
ALTERATIONS on ladies garments. Ph
NO 2-2678. 510 Catherine Street near
State. Alta Graves.

A

FOR SALE T A TRANSPORTATION
BABY BUDGIES or PARAKEETS-Easily NON-STOP TO F ORIDA! Room for 4;
trained to talk, whistle, and do tricks. Reasonable, Call Joe Krahl, NO 2-2928
30 different colors. All $5.95. 562 S. between 6 and 7 p.m. )60G

By HARRY STRAUSS
Present American writing "is in
a period of preparation and con-
solidation, and the tendencies that I
were active in past writings have
exhausted themselves," said Prof.
Philip Blair Rice, associate editor
of the- Kenyon Review, on cam-
pus for the Arts and Science Aca-
demy meeting.
Prof. Rice, chairman of Kenyon
College's phlosophy department,
added the "hard-boiled" and the
impressionist schools are finished'
and a new force in writing is pre-
senting itself.
"I find a tendency toward psy-
chological literature. Young wri-
ters are interested in motiva-
tion and character, particularly
in the problems people have in
living together, rather than ideas
and actions," he remarked.
The philosophical "man of let-
ters" said that pessimism in to-,
day's literature is largely passingj
out since "the previous generation
exploited the pessimistic phase so
much that younger people are pre-

Concerning the influences of
modern works, Prof. Rice com-
mented that the future will find
America playing its part but "it
seems to me that ahead lies a
world culture with local, origi-
nal variety.
The American writer, however,
Prof. Rice concluded, need not feel
inferior as he no longer slavishly
imitates the old novel and the old
world.

EFF C IA L
The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the University
of Michigan for which the Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial responsi-
bility. Publication in it is construe-
tive notice to all members of the
University. Notices should be sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 2552
Administration Buildng before 3 opm.

READ
DAILY
CLASS I FIEDS

pared to endure in a stoical man-
ner and it comes out in their writ-
ing."

I

s'fffiN \7 "N"AO c.'sf /a rs sal

* * * * * trur uwny sfpectu
chicken and dumplings... $1.50
Golden Apples
TOWER HOTEL NO 2-45

.

the day preceding publication (before
11 a.m. on Saturday). Summer Camp Employment. Camp
Utopia, private co-ed camp at Barryville,
SUNDAY, MARCH 28, 1954 New York, will have a representative
VOL. LXIN.at Bureau of Appointments, Tues., Mar.
. 30, to interview counselors, preferably
psychology, social work, education ma-
jors, or graduate students for the fol-
lowing skills: nature study, pioneer-
President and Mrs. Hatcher will hold ing, arts and crafts, music, folk and
the third of a series of monthly open square dancing, woodwork, ceramics,
houses for University faculty, staff, and tennis, boxing, wrestling, archery, ri-
townspeople on Sun., Mar. 28, from flery, baseball, basketball, and arch-
4 to 6, at the President's House. ery.
Attntin Eginer. Apliatins or For information and to make ap-
Aeo Engineers. Applic n f pointnents, call BureaV of Appoint-
the general Engineering Scholarships ments, Ext. 2614 or call at 3528 Admin-
for 1954-55 must be returned to 249 1istration.
West Engineering Building by April
first.

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BRAHMS REUIEM
CHANCEL CHOIR
MAYNARD KLEIN, Director
4:00 P.M. First Presbyterian Church

Seniors, College of L.S.&A., an
. Schools of Education, Music, and Pub-
lic Health. Tentative lists of senior,
for June graduation ha~e been poste(
on the Registrar's bulletin board in thi
first floor corridor, Administration Bldg
Any changes therefrom should be re
quested of the Recorder at the Regis
trar's window of the Recorder at th(
Registrar's window number 1, 1513 Ac
ministration Building.
The Eita Krom Prize. The Departmen
of Sociology will award the Eita Kroi
Prize for the best paper on any of th
topics listed below. The prize carrie
a cash award of $100. The contests

nd
-I
[S-

&4r.CuresAIJ
University Lecture, auspices of the
Department of Classical Studies, "Mod-
ern Forgeries of Biblical and Classical
Studies," E. A. Lowe, Professor of Pal-
aeography, Institute for Advanced
Study, Princeton University, Tues.,
Mar. 30, 4:15 p.m., Rackham Amphi-
theater.

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HILLE L LECTURE
PROFESSOR PRESTON
SLOSSON
on IKE-McCARTHY
fifth amendment
TONIGHT 8 P.M.
HILLEL FOUNDATION
1429 Hill Street

"FR PH ' 1E iUM yy
ENDING TODAY
"Suspenseful and witty film"
--N.Y. Post
"tTopnotch British Thriller!"
-Tribune

University Lecture in Journalism.
Walt Kelly, nationally syndicated car-
nt toonist, will be the fifth speaker in the
m series "The Press and Civil Liberties in
e Crises," on Wed., Mar. 31, at 3 p.m. in
es the Rackham Lecture Hall. The title of
is Mr. Kelly's address is "Pogo on In-
nocence by Association." The public
is invited.
Academic Notices
Registration for the Second Series of
Reading Improvement Classes will be in
Room 306, 512 South State Street (Stu-
dent Legislature Building), from 9
e eeit hIn1lctipt!
Revolutionary
- ~ Knitting Machine
Cuts knitting time in half.
Now
Reduced prices on Yarn Goods.
YARN SHOP
324 East Liberty
Open 9 to 6 Closed Saturday
Oe9 NO 2-7920
Novo0 o< 0o=0>}c -

G & S SOCIETY
... coming soon
an entertaining twosome

Gin epa SL qi/
presents
JAMES THURBER'S
"THE MALE ANIMAL"
OLIVIA DeHAVILLAND
HENRY FONDA
SUNDAY 8 only

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