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March 23, 1954 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-03-23

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TUESDAY, MARCH 23, 1954

THE IMICRIGA N DAILY

'PAGE' THItEE

TUESDAY, MARCH 23, 1954 TUE MICBIGA~ DAILY 1'AGI! T1rnvP~

... I."- .n..aaa.ikuu

1

PAST FIELD IN NCA A MEET:

Best Coach 31 CANDIDATES:

'M',OSU, Yale To Fight For Swim Title Honor Voted

SL

By JACK HORWITZ
Facing a powerful field of com-
petition, the University of Michi-
gan swimming team enters the
National Collegiate Athletic As-
sociation's championships at Syr-
acuse this weekend with its hopes
riding high for the title.
The field of competition narrows
down to a three team race with a
few outsiders trying for the indi.-
vidual championships. Ohio State's
powerhouse, Yale's 1953 leftovers
with strong sophomore reserves,
and Michigan's array of poten-
tial high scorers will battle for the
team crown.
THE BATTLE will be developed
in the freestyle races and the free-
style relays. The 50-yard freestyle
will probably be the highlight, with
Michigan's Don Hill and the Buck-
eye's Dick Cleveland attempting
to break record after record.
Both men will be pressed by
Yale's Kerry Donovan, Georgia's
Reid Patterson, and Dart-
mouth's Jack Glover. Donovan
will undoubtedly provide the
' best battle on the basis of his
fine performance in the Eastern
Intercollegiate championships.
He was timed in :22.5 for the
distance and won going away.
A repetition of the 50-yard event
will be seen in the 100-yard race.
Hill and Cleveland will vie for the
crown with Patterson, last year's
champion, pushing them all the
way.

will battle to the finish line for
both titles with Smith, Spring-
field's Bill Yorzyk, and Duncan
fighting for the third spot. Ad-
ditional strength in Ron Gora and
Bumpy Jones will give the Wol-
verines a decided advantage in the
220.
Michigan is the heavy favor-
ite to cop the 400-yard relay.
Its main opposition will come
from Ohio State, Oklafoma and
Dartmouth.
The 300-yard medley relay will
boil down to a fight between Mich-
igan and Ohio State. Oklahoma,
Harvard, and Yale will battle for
a third place spot.
The Mid-Western supremacy
will undoubtedly be shown to the
rest of the country in the NCAA
swimming championships.
elayTeam
Establishes

To Heyliger
Vic Heyliger, Wolverine hockey
coach, was presented with the
Spencer Penrose Memorial Tro-
phy last Saturday night in Bos-
ton as the "hockey coach of the
year."
Herb Gallagher, President of the
American Hockey Coaches Asso-
ciation, made the award at a din-
ner winding up the coaches' three-
day convention,
* * *
HEYLIGER was voted the award
in recognition of his excellent
coaching record here at Michigan.
As coach of the Maize and Blue
icers, he has guided his charges
into seven straight NCAA playoff
berths and to four national cham-
pionships.
A Michgian alumnus, Heylig-
er starred for the Wolverine
sextet himself before taking
over the coaching reigns at the
University of Illinois for three
years. Then he returned to Ann
Arbor in 1944 and has been here
since.

Campaigns

RON GORA
... free-style threat

THE 1500-METER freestyle will
find Ohio State's Ford Konno
seeking the title he was unable
to compete for last year. His main
opposition will be Michigan's Jack
Wardrop and John O'Reilly, Yale's
Martin Smith, and Oklahoma's
Peter Duncan.
Graham Johnson, Oklahoma's
other ace sprinter, has been
ruled ineligible by the Big Sev-
en Conference.
The 220 and the 440-yard free-
style races will probably be simi-
lar with a few additional threats
in the 220. Konno and Wardrop

DRAWING UP A PLATFORM
TAKES A MIXTURE OF NAIL-
BITING, BRAIN-RACKING

I ,. -r 3 ",. ,.

I

INe w Record The Spencer Penrose Memorial
Trophy was nade available to th2
NCAA in 1951 by the Broadmoor
Michigan's two-mile relay team Hotel in Colorado Springs, Colo-'
swept to a record-breaking vic- rado to honor the "Coach of the

)p en
All-Camipus
Election Set
sMarch 30,31
Round one 'ended in the fight
for 22 Student Legislature seats
to be filled March 30 and 31, when
31 candidates turned in petitions
and began the semi-annual elec-
tioneering stints.
Candidates looked into the his-
tory of past SL activities, talked
to present SL members and their
would-be constituents and took on
the tedious job of drafting a plat-
form to present with their peti-
tions.
ROUND TWO opened with a
completely revamped Candidates
Training Program this year. Dis-
cussions covered campus organiza-
tions and their interrelations, SL
activities and policy stands, par-
liamentary procedure and cam-
paign tips.
Acting Dean of Students Wal-
ter B. Rea and Prof. Preston
Slosson of the history depart-
ment spoke to the candidates on
extra-curricular activities and
the growth of the University
while campus leaders discussed
their respective activities.
Candidates got a general orien-
tation into SL's past activities
Swhen present Legislature members
outlined the history of the driv-
ing ban controversy, discrimina-
tion stands, SL academic freedom
actions and the National Student
Association.
ROUND THREE centered around
electioneering proper, as candi-
dates scattered posters in shop
windows and housing units all over
campus.
A room full of either blank or
interested faces will greet them
this week at the candidates
open houses in dormitories and
residence units.
Fourth and final round of elec-
tions will be climaxed Tuesday and
Wednesday, March 30 and 31, in
the all-campus balloting.
After students cast their ballots,
tense candidates will spend half a
night in the Union watching the
results of their three-week cam-
paign be tabulated.
And Union janitors the next
morning will sweep up the remains
of the semester's electioneering.

Red Wings Picked Over Leafs
In First Game of Ice Playoffs

By The Associated Press
DETROIT - The confident De-
troit Red Wings, boasting -an im-
proved Gordie Howe, are favored'
to defeat the Toronto Maple Leafs
tonight and get away to a fast
start in hockey's Stanley Cup Play-
offs.
The teams are meeting in a best-
of-seven semi-final series with the
winner advancing to the finals
All men interested in trying
out for the freshman golf team
report at the Intramural Build-
ing on Wednesday, March 24,
at 4:30 p.m.
-Rod Grambeau
last year. He apparently had ex-
hausted himself trying to break
against the winner of the Boston-
Montreal series. The Canadiens
entertain Boston tonight.
THE RED WINGS usually fin-
ish on top during the regular sea-
son-they've done it six straight
years-but it's another story when
playoff time rolls around. They've
won the cup only twice in the
last five years.
Many reasons have been ad-
vanced for the letdown In the
playoffs, the main being the
Red Wings burn themselves out
winning the regular-season
championship 'and lack the
stamina in the playoffs. That
seemed to be the case last year
when they swept to the pennant
but were eliminated by the Bos-
ton Bruins, a team which they
had walloped all season, in a
stunning first-round upset.
Howe, of course, is the Red Wing
leader but he led them nowhere
Maurice Richard's record of 50
goals in one season. Howe missed
by one but what really hurt was
that he had little left for the play-
offs.
THIS YEAR it's different, the
Red Wings say. "Howe is a 50 per
cent better player now than he
was at this time last year," says
Detroit General Manager Jack
Adams.

4

That seems to be true. TheI
big right winger is at peak form,
finishing the season strongly
as he captured his fourth
straight league scoring title with
81 points.
Toronto will be bucking a jinx
in the first two games against De-
troit. The Leafs haven't won a
game on Detroit ice this season,
losing five and tying two. Further-
more, they were shut out five times
and scored only four goals.
The Maple Leafs, however, a:e
rated as hockey's best playoff club.
They've won the regular-season
championship only once but lead
in Stanley Cup victories, with sev-
en. Detroit has won the Stanley
Cup five times, the same amount
as Montreal.
Netmen Open
orWith Alabama
Michigan's 1954 varsity tennis
squad will open a 15-meet sched-
ule with a southern training trip
of four matches early in. April,
Coach Bill Murphy announced.
The Wolverines, who finished
third in the Western Conference
last season, will open their south-
ern jaunt against the University
of Alabama April 5. Murphy will
send his squad against Spring Hill
College at Mobile, Ala., on April 7,
and then go to New Orleans, La.,
to meet Loyola April 8 and Tulane
on April 9.
Following is the regular sched-
ule:
April 24-Indiana at Ann Arbor
April 30-Notre Dame at Notre Dame
May 1-Northwestern at Evanston, Ill.
May 4-Western Michigan at Ann Ar-
bor
May 11-Michigan State at East Lan-
sing
May 14-Wisconsin at Ann Arbor
May 15-Ohio State at Columbus, 0.
May 17-Purdue at Lafayette, Ind.
May 19-Michigan State at Ann Arbor
May 21-U. of Detroit at Ann Arbor
May 22-Ilinois at An'n Arbor
May 27-28-29-Big Ten Tournament at
Champaign, ill.
June 21-26-NCAA Tournament at Se-
attle, Wash.

tory at the Cleveland Knights of
Columbus Track Meet last Friday
in a field of the nation's crack cin-
der squads,
Coach Don Canham's quartet
was clocked in 7:39.3, the fastest
time run by a college team this
year. The time which set a new
K of C meet record in Cleveland,
eclipses the Wolverine varsity rec-
ord of 7:39.8.
AMAZINGLY enough, Michigan
broke the record on a board track.
The two-mile distance consisted of
24 laps around the track, whereas
the ordinary indoor oval is 16 laps
for a two-mile distance.
Roy Christiansen started off
the race for Michigan, and fin-
ished in a tie with the Fordham
starter. John Moule and John
Ross ran the middle positions of
the event. Ross turned in a very
fastvtime of 1:52.8 to pace the
Wolverine relaymen,
Pete Gray ran the anchor lap
and crossed the finish line with
some distance to spare. Fordham,
along with Syracuse, went into the
2-mile relay undefeated in com-
petition this year. The'Pittsburgh
squad took first place in the Mil-
waukee Journal Relays two weeks
ago.
The race was close most of the
distance. Anchorman Gray, tak-
ing the baton from Ross, stretched
the Wolverines' lead over game
Fordham and Syracuse which were
in the race until the finish. Michi-
gan did not have the lead until
Ross took the number one posi-
tion in the third leg of the relay.
Of the teams entered, Michigan
State, Fordham and Pitt had de-
feated the Michigan team earlier
this season.

1

New Captain
Andy Kaul, 137-pound West-
ern Conference wrestling cham-
pion, has been elected captain
of the 1955 Wolverine squad.
Kaul is undefeated in two
years of dual meet competition
and his only defeat in the past
two years was in the Western
Conference championships to
Pete Compton, the reigning
champion from Illinois.

Year."_
Eddie Jeremiah, coach of Dart-
mouth's pucksters, was the first
winner of the silver bowl. Cheddy
Thompson of Colorado College wasI
tI

FIRST STOP IN A CANDIDATE'S ELECTION CAMPAIGN IS
THE SL BLDG.

I!

He succeeds Norvard "Snip"
Nalan, NCAA and Big Ten 130-
pound champion, as captain.
named in 1952 and JohnhMariucci,
whose Minnesota Gophers have
been runner-up to the NCAA
champions for two straight years,
took the honor last year.
The trophy is awarded on a
perpetuating basis with a smaller
replica of the huge trophy pre-
sented to each year's winner. The
winner of the trophy is picked by
a vote of the membership of the
coaches association.
Hairstyling
to please!!
Try our:
Personnel - Workmanship
Service - 10 Hairstylists
NO WAITING
The Dascola Barbers
near Michigan Theatre

CAMPAIGN POSTERS AND SL
VOTING SIGNS LIKE THIS
ONE DELUGE THE CAMPUS
AS THE TIME FOR ALL-CAM-
PUS BALLOTING DRAWS
NEAR

FINGERS CROSSED AND PETITION IN, CANDIDATE
COMPLETES FIRST STEP TOWARD ELECTION

i

Why Not!
SPORT COAT
and SLACKS
For sports or business, for men who
put a premium on comfortable at-
tire . .. the casual good looks of a "
Stoeb & Huss ensemble . ., select-
ed by salesmen whose primary in-
terest is the customer's appearance.
SPORT COATS
$27.50 to $35.00
SLACKS
$10.95 to $16.50
STRADIVARI SPORT SHIRTS
MALLORY HATS

GREYHOUND
Announces
SPECIAL PARTY RATES
On Round Trip Fares
Effective March 26
Three or more students traveling together from
Ann Arbor to any points outside the State of
Michigan, served by either the Great Lakes
Greyhound Lines, Central Greyhound, or In- j
dian Trails may purchase round-trip tickets
at a new reduced rate of one and one-half the
current one-way fare.
These special fares apply only where the pres-
ent one-way fare is listed at $3.00 or higher,
and are limited to use between March 26 and
April 23.
For complete information
, It a r - x r A .

A BRIEFING ON ELECTION ISSUES IS PART OF THE
CANDIDATE'S TRAINING PROGRAM

A.

IT HELPS TO GET A FEW ELECTIONEERING TIPS FROM
VETERAN LEGISLATORS

PHOTO FEATURE
Story by Becky Conrad
Pictures by Dick Gaskill

11

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